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User / The Molotov Line photographer / Sets / Molotov Line Journals
Piotr Tymiński / 91 items

N 1 B 1.4K C 0 E Nov 5, 2012 F Jun 2, 2014
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Trigger-happy

Gloomy, rain soaked machinegun semi-caponier idles on the filed south of Neman river. It never had its designated two Maxim machine guns fitted and, most probably, there was no crew to man it neither.

It was no obstacle for the advancing German units, it did not fire on the approaching enemy and was not fired upon. But a closer inspection reveals that what is known today as a “trigger-happy syndrome”, known from the battlegrounds of Iraq or Afghanistan, was apparently doing well in opening hours of 1941 German-Soviet war.
There's a metal “L”-shaped pipe protruding outwards from one of the walls – it's a part of the air exchange system which had never been installed inside. The immediate area around the pipe is pockmarked with bullet marks and the pipe itself is riddled with bullet holes.
I can almost see those youngsters in field grey uniforms, sleeves rolled up in June heat, as defiant as they are disappointed – the enemy is fleeing too quickly and they have no chance to pull the trigger. The pillbox is empty and there's no sign of the Soviets. How about a quick shooting competition then? Who cares about couple of rounds? There aret tons of spare ammo! And the poor pipe looks so inviting.
Little they knew on that warm day of June 1941. There was a lot of real shooting awaiting them in the years to come and, most probably, very few of them lived to tell the tale.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Lithuania LTU decay Art Visualmanuscripts

N 8 B 1.6K C 0 E Apr 12, 2015 F Apr 23, 2015
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In the opening hours of German-Soviet war Anusin strongpoint was manned by 1st company of 17th Machine Gun Artillery Battalion under the command of lt. I.I. Fedorov.
Some of the pillboxes, like the one shown on the photo (designed for two heavy machine guns) never had their armament installed. Such "dead spots" significantly lowered the intended effectiveness of the system of fire of the strongpoint. Still, Soviet defenders, clustered in the few combat-ready installations, showed much stubbornness and courage and continued their hopeless resistance for several days - not a bad feat considering the odds.
Most of them, including the company commander, died in their pillboxes.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   bunker fortification history military Molotov Line pillbox Piotr Tyminski Soviet ww2 Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 827 C 0 E Sep 26, 2009 F Jun 2, 2014
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This small, single-loophole machine gun pillbox sits quietly on a forest clearing. It can hardly be seen and that's exactly how they were supposed to look.
Some of the pillboxes were indeed built in the forests; trees were then cut down all around to provide clear field of fire. What's interesting is that 30-40 cm tree stumps were always left in place. It was a clever approach – they did not provide any significant cover for the attackers but made any wheeled vehicles movement practically impossible.
There were so many of these stumps left along the Molotov Line that even today, after more than 70 years, this kind of deforestation is called by the locals “a Russian forest”.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Szczuczyn Podlaskie Poland POL decay Art Lithuania landscape Visualmanuscripts

N 3 B 709 C 0 E Sep 13, 2012 F Jul 10, 2014
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A single-casemate pillbox in the forests north-east of Osowiec Fortress.
One of the smallest structures built on the Molotov Line, housing a 7,62 mm Maxim heavy machine gun. It was equipped with an optic scope which greatly increased accuracy within its 2,2 km ( 1,37 mile) effective range of fire.

Remnants of an earth embankment covering the structure are still visible. Back in 1941 it was completely hidden under a pile of stones and earth. With grass and scrub growing on the roof, much like on the photo, this small killer was hardly visible to the enemy.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker decay derelict fortification Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line monochrome pentax Pentax Art pillbox shelter Soviet texture urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные BiaĹ‚aszewo Podlaskie Poland POL Visualmanuscripts

N 1 B 750 C 0 E Apr 18, 2009 F Jun 2, 2014
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This antitank/machine gun pillbox, designed for two heavy machine guns and a 76,2 mm antitank gun is a typical example of how much of a failure was the Molotov Line.
Lack of time and the constant pressure to meet the deadlines resulted in poor workmanship which is evident in the way concrete was placed.
The whole structure would normally be settled deeper into the ground, but because it's not you can clearly see the he emergency exit just below the bottom of the bunker. It consisted of a short crawling space leading just outside the pillbox, right in front of a small loophole for the extra light machine gun. It was supposed, at least in theory, to provide some means of escape for the crew should the main entrance (also visible on the photo) be destroyed or blocked.

This photo is Best on black at Fluidr

Tags:   abandoned bunker derelict fortification history Linia Mołotowa military Molotov Line pentax pillbox shelter Soviet urban exploration urbex WW2 бункер заброшенные Dąbrowa Białostocka podlaskie Polska PL decay Art Poland Visualmanuscripts


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