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N 57 B 361 C 23 E Feb 13, 2020 F Feb 17, 2020
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Nuthatch - Sitta europaea


The Eurasian nuthatch or wood nuthatch (Sitta europaea) is a small passerine bird found throughout temperate Asia and in Europe, where its name is the nuthatch. Like other nuthatches, it is a short-tailed bird with a long bill, blue-grey upperparts and a black eye-stripe. It is a vocal bird with a repeated loud dwip call. There are more than 20 subspecies in three main groups; birds in the west of the range have orange-buff underparts and a white throat, those in Russia have whitish underparts, and those in the Far East have a similar appearance to European birds, but lack the white throat.

The preferred habitat is mature deciduous or mixed woodland with large, old trees, preferably oak. Pairs hold permanent territories, and nest in tree holes, usually old woodpecker nests, but sometimes natural cavities. If the entrance to the hole is too large, the female plasters it with mud to reduce its size, and often coats the inside of the cavity too. The 6–9 red-speckled white eggs are laid on a deep base of pine or other wood chips.

The Eurasian nuthatch eats mainly insects, particularly caterpillars and beetles, although in autumn and winter its diet is supplemented with nuts and seeds. The young are fed mainly on insects, with some seeds, food items mainly being found on tree trunks and large branches. The nuthatch can forage when descending trees head first, as well as when climbing. It readily visits bird tables, eating fatty man-made food items as well as seeds. It is an inveterate hoarder, storing food year-round. Its main natural predator is the Eurasian sparrowhawk.

It breeds throughout England and Wales and has recently began to breed in southern Scotland. It is a resident, with birds seldom travelling far from the woods where they hatch.

Population:

UK breeding:

220,000 territories

Tags:   Nuthatch Nuthatches Avian Animal Animals Birds. Bird Bird Photography Trees Woodlands Woodland Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Wildlife Photography Jeff Lack Photography Farmland Forest Forests Forestry Heathland Hedgerows Heathlands Heaths Moorland Marshland Moors Countryside Copse Garden Birds Glades Nikon Nature Nature Photography Ornithology

N 150 B 997 C 67 E Mar 8, 2016 F Feb 17, 2020
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Treecreeper - Certhia familiaris

The Eurasian treecreeper or common treecreeper (Certhia familiaris) is a small passerine bird also known in the British Isles, where it is the only living member of its genus, simply as treecreeper. It is similar to other treecreepers, and has a curved bill, patterned brown upperparts, whitish underparts, and long stiff tail feathers which help it creep up tree trunks. It can be most easily distinguished from the similar short-toed treecreeper, which shares much of its European range, by its different song.

The Eurasian treecreeper has nine or more subspecies which breed in different parts of its range in temperate Eurasia. This species is found in woodlands of all kinds, but where it overlaps with the short-toed treecreeper in western Europe it is more likely to be found in coniferous forests or at higher altitudes. It nests in tree crevices or behind bark flakes, and favours introduced giant sequoia as nest sites where they are available. The female typically lays five or six pink-speckled white eggs in the lined nest, but eggs and chicks are vulnerable to attack by woodpeckers and mammals, including squirrels.

The Eurasian treecreeper is insectivorous and climbs up tree trunks like a mouse, to search for insects which it picks from crevices in the bark with its fine curved bill. It then flies to the base of another tree with a distinctive erratic flight. This bird is solitary in winter, but may form communal roosts in cold weather.

Thanks to all who take the time to Comment/fav etc, it is always appreciated.

Tags:   Treecreeper Treecreepers Trees Avian Animal Animals Birds. Bird Bird Photography Countryside Copse Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Woodlands Woodland Wildlife Photography Jeff Lack Photography Garden Birds Glades Hedgerows Farmland Forest Forests Forestry Nikon Nature Photography Nature Ornithology

N 142 B 1.1K C 61 E Feb 13, 2020 F Feb 16, 2020
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Bullfinch - Pyrrhula Pyrrhula (F)

The Eurasian bullfinch, common bullfinch or bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) is a small passerine bird in the finch family, Fringillidae. In Anglophone Europe it is known simply as bullfinch, as it is the original bird to bear the name bullfinch.

The bullfinch is a bulky bull-headed bird. The upper parts are grey; the flight feathers and short thick bill are black; as are the cap and face in adults (they are greyish-brown in juveniles), and the white rump and wing bars are striking in flight. The adult male has red underparts, but females and young birds have grey-buff underparts. It moults between July and October, but males do not have the duller autumn plumage that is typical of some other finches. The song of this unobtrusive bird contains fluted whistles, and is often described as 'mournful'.

This bird breeds across Europe and temperate Asia. It is mainly resident, but many northern birds migrate further south in the winter. Mixed woodland with some conifers is favoured for breeding, including parkland and gardens.

This species does not form large flocks outside the breeding season, and is usually seen as a pair or family group.

The food is mainly seeds and buds of fruit trees, which can make it a pest in orchards: in England for centuries every parish paid a bounty for every bullfinch killed. Ash and hawthorn are favoured in autumn and early winter. If wild bird cover is planted for it, kale, quinoa and millet are preferred, next to tall hedges or woodland.

Population:

UK breeding:
190,000

Tags:   Bullfinch Avian Animal Animals Birds. Bird Bird Photography Countryside Copse Bushes Heathland Hedgerows Heathlands Farmland Forest Finch Finches Forests Forestry Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Wildlife Photography Jeff Lack Photography Song Birds Garden Birds Glades Grasslands Trees Woodlands Woodland Nature Nature Photography Nikon Ornithology

N 174 B 1.4K C 96 E Feb 13, 2020 F Feb 16, 2020
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Bullfinch - Pyrrhula Pyrrhula (M)

The Eurasian bullfinch, common bullfinch or bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) is a small passerine bird in the finch family, Fringillidae. In Anglophone Europe it is known simply as bullfinch, as it is the original bird to bear the name bullfinch.

The bullfinch is a bulky bull-headed bird. The upper parts are grey; the flight feathers and short thick bill are black; as are the cap and face in adults (they are greyish-brown in juveniles), and the white rump and wing bars are striking in flight. The adult male has red underparts, but females and young birds have grey-buff underparts. It moults between July and October, but males do not have the duller autumn plumage that is typical of some other finches. The song of this unobtrusive bird contains fluted whistles, and is often described as 'mournful'.

This bird breeds across Europe and temperate Asia. It is mainly resident, but many northern birds migrate further south in the winter. Mixed woodland with some conifers is favoured for breeding, including parkland and gardens.

This species does not form large flocks outside the breeding season, and is usually seen as a pair or family group.

The food is mainly seeds and buds of fruit trees, which can make it a pest in orchards: in England for centuries every parish paid a bounty for every bullfinch killed. Ash and hawthorn are favoured in autumn and early winter. If wild bird cover is planted for it, kale, quinoa and millet are preferred, next to tall hedges or woodland.

Population:

UK breeding:
190,000

Tags:   Bullfinch Avian Animal Animals Birds. Butterflies Bird Photography Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Woodlands Wildlife Photography Woodland Woods Jeff Lack Photography Song Birds Farmland Fields Forest Finches Finch Forestry Garden Birds Glades Hedgerows Heathland Heaths Countryside Copse Bushes Trees Nature Nature Photography Nikon Ornithology

N 132 B 1.5K C 78 E Feb 12, 2020 F Feb 15, 2020
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Jay - Garrulus Glandarius

Although they are the most colourful members of the crow family, jays are actually quite difficult to see. They are shy woodland birds, rarely moving far from cover. The screaming call usually lets you know a jay is nearby and it is usually given when a bird is on the move, so watch for a bird flying between the trees with its distinctive flash of white on the rump. Jays are famous for their acorn feeding habits and in the autumn you may see them burying acorns for retrieving later in the winter.

The word jay has an archaic meaning in American slang meaning a person who chatters impertinently.

The term jaywalking was coined in 1915 to label persons crossing a busy street carelessly and becoming a traffic hazard. The term began to imply recklessness or impertinent behavior as the convention became established.

In January 2014, Canadian author Robert Joseph Greene embarked on a lobbying campaign among ornithologists in Europe and North America to get Merriam-Websters Dictionary to have a "Jabber of Jays" as an official term under bird groups.

Population:

UK breeding:
170,000 territories


Tags:   Jay Jays Countryside Copse Corvids Avian Animal Animals Wildlife. Wildbirds Woodlands Woodland Woods Hedgerows Farmland Forest Fields Forests Forestry Scrub Trees Nature Nature Photography Nikon Ornithology


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