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User / Jeff Lack Wildlife&Nature
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N 68 B 398 C 35 E May 18, 2022 F May 19, 2022
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Yellow Wagtail (F) - Motacilla Flava
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The yellow wagtail can be spotted running about, chasing insects on lowland damp marshes and meadows during summer. As its name suggests, it does wag its tail!

Classified in the UK as Red under the Birds of Conservation Concern 4: the Red List for Birds (2015).

The Yellow Wagtail likes damp marshes, meadows and farmland, and spends much of its time running about on the ground, chasing insects disturbed by the feet of livestock. Yellow wagtails nest on the ground or in long grass, using plants, grasses and stems to build a cup-shape which they line with fur. They can have up to two broods, each with five or six eggs. A summer visitor, they arrive from their African wintering grounds from March onwards.

The yellow wagtail is olivey-green above and yellow below, with a yellow face and a black-and-white tail. Males are brighter than females. The similar grey wagtail also has a yellow belly, but has a grey back and black wings. Yellow wagtails have much shorter tails than the other two species of breeding wagtail in the UK.
Distribution
Widespread, mostly in the lowlands of Central and Eastern England, Wales and southern Scotland.
Habitats

GrasslandFreshwaterFarmlandWetlands

Did you know?
Eight different subspecies of yellow wagtail can be found in Europe, differing in the colour of the males' heads. For example, in France and Germany, you will find the blue-headed wagtail; in Italy, the grey-headed wagtail; and in Finland, the ashy-headed wagtail.

Tags:   Yellow-Wagtail Wagtail Wagtails Avian Animal Animals Birds. Bird Bird Photography Countryside Farmland Fields Grasslands Moorland Marshland Marshes Moors Meadows Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Wildlife Photography Song Birds Summer Migrant Nature Nature Photography Nikon Ornithology Jeff Lack Photography

N 81 B 415 C 30 E May 12, 2022 F May 19, 2022
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Yellow Wagtail (M) - Motacilla Flava


The yellow wagtail can be spotted running about, chasing insects on lowland damp marshes and meadows during summer. As its name suggests, it does wag its tail!

Classified in the UK as Red under the Birds of Conservation Concern 4: the Red List for Birds (2015).

The Yellow Wagtail likes damp marshes, meadows and farmland, and spends much of its time running about on the ground, chasing insects disturbed by the feet of livestock. Yellow wagtails nest on the ground or in long grass, using plants, grasses and stems to build a cup-shape which they line with fur. They can have up to two broods, each with five or six eggs. A summer visitor, they arrive from their African wintering grounds from March onwards.

The yellow wagtail is olivey-green above and yellow below, with a yellow face and a black-and-white tail. Males are brighter than females. The similar grey wagtail also has a yellow belly, but has a grey back and black wings. Yellow wagtails have much shorter tails than the other two species of breeding wagtail in the UK.
Distribution
Widespread, mostly in the lowlands of Central and Eastern England, Wales and southern Scotland.
Habitats

GrasslandFreshwaterFarmlandWetlands

Did you know?
Eight different subspecies of yellow wagtail can be found in Europe, differing in the colour of the males' heads. For example, in France and Germany, you will find the blue-headed wagtail; in Italy, the grey-headed wagtail; and in Finland, the ashy-headed wagtail.

Tags:   Yellow-Wagtail Wagtail Wagtails Song Birds Summer Migrant Avian Animal Animals Birds. Bird Bird Photography Countryside Farmland Fields Grasslands Wetlands Wildlife. Wildbirds Wildlife Photography Nature Nature Photography Nikon Ornithology Jeff Lack Photography

N 109 B 741 C 40 E May 7, 2022 F May 18, 2022
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Little Ringed Plover- Charadius Dubius

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The Little ringed plover first nested in the UK in 1938, but has since moved in happily! It has taken advantage of an increase in man-made flooded gravel pits, reservoirs and quarries that provide perfect habitats.


Delicately built small plover with bright yellow eyerings. Note dull pinkish legs and large white forehead patch (in adults). Plumage much like bulkier Ringed Plover, but white eyebrow continues unbroken across forehead. In flight shows narrow, indistinct whitish wing stripe. Breeds on stony substrates around lakes, gravel pits, and along rivers; migrants occur in wide variety of fresh and brackish wetland habitats, but rarely out on open tidal areas. Clipped “peu” call quite distinct from call of similar Common Ringed Plover.

Tags:   Little Ringed Plover Plovers Plover Avian Animal Animals Birds. Bird Photography Countryside Coastal Birds Coastline Coast Farmland Fields Reservoirs Lakes Ponds Shore-Birds Summer Migrant Seashore Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Wildlife Photography Water-Birds Nature Nature Photography Nikon Ornithology Jeff Lack Photography

N 133 B 785 C 39 E Apr 27, 2022 F May 18, 2022
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Dipper - Cinclus Cinclus
aka Water Ouzel

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Dippers are members of the genus Cinclus in the bird family Cinclidae, named for their bobbing or dipping movements. They are unique among passerines for their ability to dive and swim underwater.

They have a characteristic bobbing motion when perched beside the water, giving them their name. While under water, they are covered by a thin, silvery film of air, due to small bubbles being trapped on the surface of the plumage.

Dippers are found in suitable freshwater habitats in the highlands of the Americas, Europe and Asia. In Africa they are only found in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco. They inhabit the banks of fast-moving upland rivers with cold, clear waters, though, outside the breeding season, they may visit lake shores and sea coasts.

The high haemoglobin concentration in their blood gives them a capacity to store oxygen greater than that of other birds, allowing them to remain underwater for thirty seconds or more, whilst their basal metabolic rate is approximately one-third slower than typical terrestrial passerines of similar mass. One small population wintering at a hot spring in Suntar-Khayata Mountains of Siberia feeds underwater when air temperatures drop below −55 °C (−67 °F).

Dippers are completely dependent on fast-flowing rivers with clear water, accessible food and secure nest-sites. They may be threatened by anything that affects these needs such as water pollution, acidification and turbidity caused by erosion. River regulation through the creation of dams and reservoirs, as well as channelization, can degrade and destroy dipper habitat.

Dippers are also sometimes hunted or otherwise persecuted by humans for various reasons. The Cyprus race of the white-throated dipper is extinct. In the Atlas Mountains dippers are claimed to have aphrodisiacal properties. In parts of Scotland and Germany, until the beginning of the 20th century, bounties were paid for killing dippers because of a misguided perception that they were detrimental to fish stocks through predation on the eggs and fry of salmonids.


Population:

UK breeding:

6,200-18,700 pairs

Tags:   Dipper Dippers Avian Animal Animals Birds. Bird Bird Photography Water-Birds Waterways Woodlands Wildlife Photography Wetlands Water Ouzel Ouzel Ouzels Streams River Birds Rivers River-Banks Nature Nature Photography Nikon Ornithology Jeff Lack Photography

N 155 B 829 C 63 E May 9, 2022 F May 17, 2022
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The common whitethroat (Sylvia communis) is a common and widespread typical warbler which breeds throughout Europe and across much of temperate western Asia. This small passerine bird is strongly migratory, and winters in tropical Africa, Arabia, and Pakistan.

This is one of several Sylvia species that has distinct male and female plumages. Both sexes are mainly brown above and buff below, with chestnut fringes to the secondary remiges. The adult male has a grey head and a white throat. The female lacks the grey head, and the throat is duller.

This species may appear to be closely related to the lesser whitethroat, the species having evolved only during the end of the last ice age similar to the willow warbler and chiffchaffs. However, researchers found the presence of a white throat is an unreliable morphological marker for relationships in Sylvia, and the greater and lesser whitethroats are not closely related.

This is a bird of open country and cultivation, with bushes for nesting. The nest is built in low shrub or brambles, and 3–7 eggs are laid. Like most warblers, it is insectivorous, but will also eat berries and other soft fruit.


Population:

UK breeding:

1,100,000 territories

Tags:   Whitethroat Common Whitethroat Warbler Warblers Wildlife. Wildbirds Wetlands Woodlands Woodland Wildlife Photography Avian Animal Animals Birds. Bird Bird Photography Countryside Copse Farmland Forest Forestry Fields Garden Birds Glades Grasslands Gorse Heathland Hedgerows Heathlands Heaths Moorland Marshland Meadows Moors Nature Nature Photography Nikon Ornithology Jeff Lack Photography Brambles Song Birds Summer Migrant


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