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Pekabo / 2,638 items

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"...The demeanor of the cactus wren is that of a creature which finds ample interest and enjoyment in life; especially is this true of the immature individuals. The birds of the summer brood remain together for several weeks after leaving the nest, and in little troops of three or four they come fearlessly about houses and perform all manner of clownish antics and acrobatics, all to the accompaniment of a rollicking chatter. I have seen one start from the seat of a wicker chair, run nimbly up the back and over the top, and hang head downward on the other side; often they race back and forth along the ridge of a building with exultant squawks, perhaps clinging to the edge of the roof and twisting their necks to peer underneath. Their curiosity is insatiable; everything must be climbed over, all packages, receptacles, cracks, and crannies looked into and anything inside pulled out if possible. Though the adults lose some of the frivolity, the attitude of good humor seems to remain, and quarrels are few. The only actual battle I recall seeing resulted when one immature bird attempted to bring material to a nest being built by another."
Mr. Dawson (1923)

Tags:   Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus Cucarachero Desértico Troglodyte des cactus Alta Vicente Reserve pekabo90401 southern california birds Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles cactus wren Lightroom Wesen Cylindropuntia cholla cactus palos verdes birds Canon 80D canon 80 D 100-400

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"Your life is like a river. If you’re aiming for a goal that isn't your destiny, you will always be swimming against the current. Young Gandhi wants to be a stock car racer? Not gonna happen. Little Anne Frank wants to be a high school teacher? Tough Anne. That's not your destiny. But you will go on to move the hearts and minds of millions. Find out what your destiny is and the river will carry you."

lyn cassady
Men who stare at goats

Tags:   Phénopèple luisant Capulinero Negro Phainopepla nitens juvenile bird Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles Los liones canyon Inceville southern california birds Canon 80D canon 80 D 100-400 Lightroom saying hello

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"California Scrub-Jays are great to watch because they’re animated, vocal, and playful. They move about in bold hops and lunges, looking around with sharp turns of the head. They're often found in flocks during fall and winter; particularly birds that don't have territories of their own (known as "floaters"), which can form flocks up to about 30 individuals. Much as in a group of chickens, a dominance hierarchy governs how members of these flocks behave toward each other."
celebrateurbanbirds.org/

Tags:   California Scrub Jay Aphelocoma californica Chara Californiana Geai buissonnier juvenile bird pekabo90401 Pacific palisades birds southern california birds Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles 100-400 pekabo40401 Inceville

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"You’ve likely seen them. Barn swallows live across the Lower 48 where they build mud nests under bridges and overhangs and in – you guessed it – barns. They streak through the air in the early morning and late evening scarfing up flying insects by the hundreds.

Very few overwinter in the U.S. Most barn swallows migrate through Mexico and Central America down to Argentina and Chile.

And in an interesting turn of evolution, some started to stay in South America where they are taking advantage of increased infrastructure.

“They live in culverts and the latitude south of the equator is the same as north of the equator,” Iliff says.

Something allowed the birds to switch, and those that breed in North America overwinter in Argentina at the same time as others breed in Argentina and overwinter in Brazil."
blog.nature.org/science/2018/03/06/four-impressive-bird-m...

Tags:   Hirundo rustica barn swallow youngster takes a brief rest Canon 100-400 80D canon 80 D Lightroom Wesen Ventura county Sycamore Canyon Hirondelle rustique Golondrina Común pekabo90401 southern california birds Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles I miss my old life

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Ten Lessons from the American Robin

1. It’s good to be common

The American Robin is one of the most common and widespread native birds in North America. This large population gives robins great resilience in the face of ecological and climatic challenges.
Build the movement!

2. Adapt to where you are

Robins are found from steamy southern swamps to the Alaskan tundra. Their remarkable ability to adapt to local conditions and resources is the secret of their success.
Frame your message with regard to local conditions

3. And also have one special skill

For all their adaptability, robins also have a specialized skill: their earthworm-hunting behavior, which opens up a rich resource few other birds exploit.

Know your special talent and make the most of it

4. ‑Figure out how to take advantage of the dominant paradigm

Robins thrive in part because of their ability to make the most of human environments, nesting in our backyards and foraging on our lawns.

Don’t be afraid to make alliances and to engage with mass media

5. Be alert for phonies

Robins are among the few birds able to detect and toss out the eggs of the parasitic Brown-headed Cowbird, thus protecting their nests from invaders.

Welcome only those who truly share your values

6. Know when to move on

Throughout their wide range, robins exhibit facultative migration – that is, they adjust their winter residency to conditions. In a cold winter, they head south; if the next year is mild, they may remain resident all year.

Know when to stage a tactical retreat, in order to win another time

7. Produce lots of young

Robins often produce two broods of offspring per year. That gives them a huge advantage compared to less fecund species.

There’s no substitute for the energy and idealism of the young when building a movement.

8. Be confident

Robins are often described as “bold,” “confident,” and “confiding,” in contrast to related birds like the shy Varied Thrush. There is no doubt that the outgoing behavior of robins has contributed greatly to their success.

Believe in your cause whole-heartedly, and others will too.

9. Be friendly

In addition to their boldness, robins appeal to us because they’re friendly – even if they’re keeping us company in the garden in order to snatch up earthworms!

A friendly, positive approach will gain many more listeners than one wrapped in doom and gloom.

10. Sing!

For many of us, the rich warbling song of the robin announces the arrival of spring, lifting our spirits after the hard winter. Isn’t a beautiful message what we all want to hear?

No matter what, sing!

Pepper Trail is a naturalist and writer in Ashland, Oregon.

Tags:   Turdus migratorius Zorzal Americano Merle d'Amérique Rustic Canyon southern california birds Bird watching Bird watching Los Angeles 100-400 Canon 80D canon 80 D american robin robin bird with a berry down the hatch birding with Jerry Wesen


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