Fluidr
about   tools   help   Y   Q   a         b   n   l
User / haelio
478 items

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Humayun's tomb is one of many 16th century tombs dotted around New Delhi.

This red-sandstone constructed tomb lies in East Delhi near the Yamuna river which flows roughly North/South through the massive city. It was designed by a persian architect for Humayun's wife who commissioned it in the latter half of the 16th century and houses several Mughals in addition to Humayun. This tomb was the first of its kind as previous Mughal mausolea in India had been far more modest affairs, and it set a trent which culminated in the magnificent Taj Mahal.

One of the things I learnt in my trip to India in 2015 was the relation between the Mongols and the Mughals. There are many links between the two -- not least the fact 'Mughal' appears to be a corruption of 'Mongol' -- but a lot happened over the 300 years between Genghis Khan's death and the founding of the Moghul dynasty in Northern India and Pakistan. For one, the ancestry of the founding Mughals don't trace from Genghis himself, but via a Turco-Persian emperor Timur (or Tamerlane) who ruled large swathes of Persia and Central Asia in the 14th century who styled his empire after that of Genghis Khan.

Coming full circle, the link between Humayun's tomb and the self-styled Mongols was that the tomb was designed after the Timur's tomb in Samarkand in Eastern Uzbekistan.

New Delhi, India, 2015

Sony a7R Mark II with Zeiss FE 16-35mm f/4

Tags:   camera:sony_a7r2 SixteenByNine india mughal humayun tomb emperor f:ultrawide f:wide desaturated blackandwhite maqbara mongol delhi 'new yamuna mausoleum

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

The Medina streets in the coastal town of Essaouira are a great place to wander about to soak in Morocco. Although it sees its fair share of tourists, the town is far less busy and commercialized than Marrakech. Since it's only a three hour drive away, it's well worth visiting as a day trip from Marrakech.

Essaouira, Morocco, 2010

Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 105mm f/4L IS

Tags:   Morocco Marrakech-Tensift-Al Haouz MAR camera:canon_5d2 essaouira street square f:long woman narrow shop fabric medina

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

The otherworldly landscape of Landmannalaugar in the highlands of Iceland is best viewed from the summit of Bláhnjúkur.

The northward view form the summit of the 940m peak of Bláhnjúkur provides a concise image of the different landscapes of Landmannalaugar. From the snow-striated lava fields and multi-coloured mountains to the West across to the sandy mountains rising up on either side of valleys scribbled in by young rivers in the East, there is a lot to take in. In between these starkly different alien scenes lies the Landmannalaugar base camp surrounded by a small patch of greenery around its geothermal springs. Further on in the distance lies Frostastaðavatn lake getting a smattering of rain.

Landmannalaugar, Iceland, 2009

Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L

Tags:   camera:canon_5d2 panorama iceland landmannalaugar bláhnjúkur bláhnúkur frostastaðavatn lava lavafield cinemascope

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Hidden in a quiet glen in Northern Cornwall and around a gentle curve in the path carved through the valley by the Trevillet river lies a spectacular waterfall.

This twenty metre high waterfall has to be the most unusual waterfall I've ever seen. The upper reaches comprise a chute leading into a cascade that then flows through a hole in the rock. I must admit I'm not exactly sure how erosion ended up with the waterfall in its current shape but I guess that adds to the mysterious appeal of the place.

There's a lot of myth and legend around this wooded area near Tintagel. One myth suggests that in the sixth century, St Nectan (after whom the glen and waterfall are named) had a hermitage above the waterfall, and rang a silver bell to warn ships of the dangers of offshore rocks at the mouth of the Rocky Valley during storms. Like much of this part of Cornwall, it is also linked with Arthurian legend.

Taking this photo was fun! The area is a lot more cramped than this photo makes it seem, and you need to stand in the plunge pool up to your ankles to even see the waterfall. In order to get a good view of it, you need to walk closer and deeper, and with the force of the water being confined to such an enclosed space, there is a lot of swirling mist around that soaks your camera and you. On the bright side, these water droplets did show up as a beam of light coming down from the top of the waterfall.

St Nectan's Glen, North Cornwall, England, 2016

Sony a7R Mark II with Zeiss Loxia 21mm f/2.8

Tags:   camera:sony_a7r2 f:wide f:ultrawide england cornwall waterfall square green glen merlin St Nectan's Glen longexposure tintagel well trevillet river St Nectan's Kieve

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Two days after being violently shot out of our Sun, sub-atomic particles glissade through the atmosphere over Norway adding a tinge of green to the summer twilight sky.

We were incredibly lucky on our trip to have an auroral display bright enough to be visible even where the sun had set a short while earlier. This has been the only time I've seen the afterglow of sunset, the colours of twilight and the green and purple of the northern lights in a single scene.

One of the hardest things to do when taking a photograph of the aurora (other than trying not to get too excited and messing up your settings!) is to ensuring that you have a good composition. It's too easy to be mesmerized by the dramatic show going on overhead and only take a picture upwards without any environmental context, but without such context, it's difficult for a viewer to get a holistic appreciation of the scene.

This is harder than it sounds as most of the time the aurora only shows up when it's very dark and so any foreground is also very dark. You can work around this using artificial light or be lucky with a dim moon on the oppsite side to the aurora, but my preferred approach is to find a reflective surface like snow or ice, or even better liquid water in a lake or puddle. The problem with liquid water is that it tends to ripple which mar any clean reflections, which mean that using the sea is usually quite hard. In order to get this photo, I walked a short distance away from the beach and positioned my camera near a small puddle. By using a wide lens and lowering the camera, I managed to make the small puddle large enough to balance out the composition and hopefully provide interest to the viewer in all parts of the frame.

Utakleiv beach, Lofoten, Norway, 2016

Sony a7R Mark II with Samyang 14mm f/2.8 UMC

Tags:   camera:sony_a7r2 f:wide f:ultrawide norway aurora beach lofoten seascape twilight ThreeByTwo reflections vertical vestvågøya utakleiv


1%