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User / Zeb Andrews
Zeb Andrews / 4,493 items

N 98 B 8.7K C 38 E Sep 20, 2011 F Sep 20, 2011
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I climbed South Sister last month because it was there. We planned our summit for sunset so we ended up descending in the dark. I remember wearily stumbling back into camp at midnight, extremely tired, hungry and dehydrated (despite the massive amount of water I left camp with). It was quite a struggle to set up the stove and make some dinner, even more so to make the 1/4 mile trek down to the lake to pump water (but I cannot begin to describe how good ice cold mountain lake water tastes at such a time). Despite fatigue, I did both of these things, and then still summoned the energy to set up the camera to work on a star trail exposure while I collapsed onto my sleeping bag. It was 12:30 by the time I got all this done, so we set our alarms for a four hour exposure in order to close the cameras before the sun started to light up the sky, washing out the stars.

It is a pretty amazing thing to climb a mountain like this. But I think it is even more amazing to lie on a mountain, as massive as it is, and look up and realize how dwarfed it is by everything around. To watch the stars wheel and dance overhead and get just the barest glimpse of the perspective on it all.

On a semi-related side note, I don't dwell too much on things I have little power to control, but it is a mild regret of mine that I will not live long enough to see viable interstellar travel. I would love to travel to those same stars and amongst them, photographing all the way there and back again. But then again, who knows exactly what the future may bring. ;-)

And I know some of you may suggest that I remove the light trails from the planes. I appreciate the thought, but I don't think I will. They are, after all, part of the story I wish to tell.

Tags:   South Sister Hasselblad night star trails lights nature mountain film square Kodak Tri-X curves alpine Oregon Pacific Northwest Blue Moon Camera

N 170 B 13.0K C 58 E Sep 20, 2009 F Sep 20, 2009
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An image I took with my Holga and Ilford SFX film of the Palouse this past Spring. There are few better film/camera combinations I know of than Holgas loaded with SFX, they make such beautiful images together.

It has been a pretty good week, but a busy one as well, with a couple of stories worth sharing. Unfortunately I do not have the time to type them out this morning, breakfast is still awaiting and Belly is getting more impatient by the minute. So the stories will have to wait for my next post, but seeing as how I was a couple of days behind in posting I wanted to get something up this morning, before the day moved me on to other things.

Holgas are vastly misunderstood and under-appreciated cameras, both by those who have never used them and by those that use them every day. Like my pinhole, my Holga continually surprises me with how it sees the world, which perhaps is even more impressive than the pinhole which at least has the advantageous characteristic of making its images without a lens. A Holga is a "normal" camera just built very cheaply out of plastic. So it often carries the moniker of a "crappy" camera. Yet whenever I see these cameras in the hands of someone who knows how to use it, they seem anything but.

Some of my favorite Holga photos, in no particular order:

Here
another
another
another
another
another
and another
and one more

Tags:   Holga IR Ilford SFX 200 square Washington landscape film duotone Palouse fields hills plastic cameras toy camera Zeb Andrews photography Pacific Northwest infrared farming Blue Moon Camera

N 80 B 5.2K C 17 E Jan 15, 2013 F Jan 15, 2013
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A customer yesterday was joking with me if I had left any photos of the bridge undone for other photographers. Considering that I keep going down there and coming back with new images, I am pretty sure there are plenty of unmade photos to go around. ;-)

On an unrelated note, if you need a good activity for your lunch hour tomorrow, local platinum/palladium photographer Ray Bidegain will be giving a lecture at the Portland Art Museum as part of the Brown Bag Lunch Lectures. The talks are held the third Wednesday of every month from 12-1 and feature some noteworthy local photographer or another. Better yet, they're free and open to the public. I highly recommend them. Look for the Miller Room in the Mark Building.

Tags:   Hasselblad Hasselblad 500C film fog bridge foggy Portland Oregon PDX square analog minimal Pacific Northwest b&w Today's theme is fog and St. Johns Bridge winter St Johns Bridge suspension quiet mornings Blue Moon Camera

N 36 B 4.8K C 14 E Jan 7, 2013 F Jan 7, 2013
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In other words: photography. Hello August dahlia, not used to seeing you in January, but I am not going to complain one bit.

Tags:   Pentax 67 film flower floral floralscape colorful abstract reversed lenses macro Macro photography Close Up Canby Swan Island Dahlia Festival dahlia Oregon analog Pacific Northwest Blue Moon Camera

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I have spent several lifetimes under this bridge, or so it seems when I look back on my collection of images. I have also seen several lifetimes spent under this same bridge. Millions and billions of waking (and sleeping) moments spent walking, talking, reading, playing, picnicing, listening to jazz, dressing up like a pirate, watching Star Trek episodes reenacted, photographing in the snow, bicycling, living, kayaking and fishing. And fishing, right. As in this flyfisherman and me, sharing the same bridge on a foggy afternoon not too long past but at least two different lifetimes ago it may seem.

Tags:   Portland PDX St Johns Bridge bridge foggy Oregon fishing Cathedral Park b&w monochrome Canon 5DII dslr Willamette River


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