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User / Yasu Torigoe / Sets / Dec 2018 Les Andelys France
Yasu Torigoe / 61 items

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Petit Andely Saint Sauveur Church: Building Chateau-Gaillard required the presence of over three thousands workers in les Andelys. The Saint-Sauveur church was built for them. Works started in 1198 and were finished four years later, in 1202, that is why the church has an outstanding unity.
Outisde, note : 1) the greek cross structure, 2) the elegant spire, 3) the blessing Christ (13th century) in the entrance of the church.
Inside, note :the gothic choir and the pipe organ, one of France's most beautiful ones. (1674)(lesandelys.com/church/)

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Pont-de-l'Arche is a commune of the Eure département in France. Notable monuments include the parish church of Notre-Dame-des-Arts, which was built in the late Flamboyant style. Wikipedia

Seine River: The Seine is a 777-kilometre-long (483 mi) river and an important commercial waterway within the Paris Basin in the north of France. It rises at Source-Seine, 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Dijon in northeastern France in the Langres plateau, flowing through Paris and into the English Channel at Le Havre (and Honfleur on the left bank).[2] It is navigable by ocean-going vessels as far as Rouen, 120 kilometres (75 mi) from the sea. Over 60 percent of its length, as far as Burgundy, is negotiable by commercial riverboats, and nearly its whole length is available for recreational boating; excursion boats offer sightseeing tours of the river banks in Paris, lined with top monuments including Notre-Dame, the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre Museum and Musée d'Orsay. Wikipedia

Tags:   Paroisse Saint-Pierre Deux Rives at Pont de l'Arche Pont-de which was built in the late Flamboyant style.Wikipedia Paroisse Saint-Pierre Deux Rives at Pont de l'Arche Pont-de-l'Arche is a commune of the Eure département in France. Notable monuments include the parish church of Notre-Dame-des-Arts

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The town of Les Andelys lies in a tight bend of the Seine. The valley has been shaped by the river, forming white cliffs. A walk on the riverside offers beautiful views on the ruined castle Chateau-Gaillard, the old houses of Petit-Andely and the Seine valley.

Seine River: The Seine is a 777-kilometre-long (483 mi) river and an important commercial waterway within the Paris Basin in the north of France. It rises at Source-Seine, 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Dijon in northeastern France in the Langres plateau, flowing through Paris and into the English Channel at Le Havre (and Honfleur on the left bank).[2] It is navigable by ocean-going vessels as far as Rouen, 120 kilometres (75 mi) from the sea. Over 60 percent of its length, as far as Burgundy, is negotiable by commercial riverboats, and nearly its whole length is available for recreational boating; excursion boats offer sightseeing tours of the river banks in Paris, lined with top monuments including Notre-Dame, the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre Museum and Musée d'Orsay. Wikipedia

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Château Gaillard ("Strong Castle") is a ruined medieval castle, located 90 metres above the commune of Les Andelys overlooking the River Seine, in the Eure département of Normandy, France. It is located some 95 kilometres north-west of Paris and 40 kilometres from Rouen. Construction began in 1196 under the auspices of Richard the Lionheart, who was simultaneously King of England and feudal Duke of Normandy. The castle was expensive to build, but the majority of the work was done in an unusually short period of time. It took just two years and, at the same time, the town of Petit Andely was constructed. Château Gaillard has a complex and advanced design, and uses early principles of concentric fortification; it was also one of the earliest European castles to use machicolations. The castle consists of three enclosures separated by dry moats, with a keep in the inner enclosure.

Château Gaillard was captured in 1204 by the king of France, Philip II, after a lengthy siege. In the mid-14th century, the castle was the residence of the exiled David II of Scotland. The castle changed hands several times in the Hundred Years' War, but in 1449 the French king captured Château Gaillard from the English king definitively, and from then on it remained in French ownership. Henry IV of France ordered the demolition of Château Gaillard in 1599; although it was in ruins at the time, it was felt to be a threat to the security of the local population. The castle ruins are listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture. (Wikipedia)

The town of Les Andelys lies in a tight bend of the Seine. The valley has been shaped by the river, forming white cliffs. A walk on the riverside offers beautiful views on the ruined castle Chateau-Gaillard, the old houses of Petit-Andely and the Seine valley.
Seine River: The Seine is a 777-kilometre-long (483 mi) river and an important commercial waterway within the Paris Basin in the north of France. It rises at Source-Seine, 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Dijon in northeastern France in the Langres plateau, flowing through Paris and into the English Channel at Le Havre (and Honfleur on the left bank).[2] It is navigable by ocean-going vessels as far as Rouen, 120 kilometres (75 mi) from the sea. Over 60 percent of its length, as far as Burgundy, is negotiable by commercial riverboats, and nearly its whole length is available for recreational boating; excursion boats offer sightseeing tours of the river banks in Paris, lined with top monuments including Notre-Dame, the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre Museum and Musée d'Orsay. Wikipedia

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The town of Les Andelys lies in a tight bend of the Seine. The valley has been shaped by the river, forming white cliffs. A walk on the riverside offers beautiful views on the ruined castle Chateau-Gaillard, the old houses of Petit-Andely and the Seine valley.

Seine River: The Seine is a 777-kilometre-long (483 mi) river and an important commercial waterway within the Paris Basin in the north of France. It rises at Source-Seine, 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Dijon in northeastern France in the Langres plateau, flowing through Paris and into the English Channel at Le Havre (and Honfleur on the left bank).[2] It is navigable by ocean-going vessels as far as Rouen, 120 kilometres (75 mi) from the sea. Over 60 percent of its length, as far as Burgundy, is negotiable by commercial riverboats, and nearly its whole length is available for recreational boating; excursion boats offer sightseeing tours of the river banks in Paris, lined with top monuments including Notre-Dame, the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre Museum and Musée d'Orsay. Wikipedia


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