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N 1 B 252 C 0 E Sep 28, 2018 F Oct 17, 2018
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N 61 B 26.1K C 0 E Dec 5, 2013 F Dec 5, 2013
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Tags:   victorian card colour imagery archives vintage christmas new year's xmas cards holiday illustration gift children animals nova scotia retro greetingcard cat cats kitten kittens

N 16 B 21.6K C 0 E Jan 1, 1898 F Jul 29, 2014
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Identifier: angoracathowtobr00jame
Title: The Angora cat; how to breed train and keep it;
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: James, Robert Kent, [from old catalog] ed
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston, James bros.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation


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D o 73 Pi ►-■ N 0 P 73 ^ w n »-. p » tT 3- p n> 3 -.* d- RULES AND REGULATIONS. Adopted by National Cat Show for Exhibitions held by the Society, I. Competition is open to all. Prize lists and entry forms may be had on applicationto the Secretary, National Cat Show. No entries willbe received unless made on the regular entry form. A charge of two dollars ($2) will be made on everycat or pair of kittens entered in the several classes.The form of entry, properly filled out, together with en-trance fees, must be sent to the Secretary, NationalCat Show. If the entry is accepted, a receipt will besent to the exhibitor, which receipt must be produced atthe close of the show, or cats will not be delivered. IV. An address label and circular of instructions will beforwarded to each exhibitor, together with a metal num-ber, which must be attached by a collar or ribbon to theneck of each cat, and which number will agree with thecats cage and with its number in the catalogue ofentries.58

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BLACK AND WHITE MALE. 16 MONTHS OLD. R ULES AND RE G ULA TIONS. 5 9 v.Each cat must be securely packed in a separate bas-ket, except in the case of pairs of kittens, which mustbe sent together. VI. Cats will be fed and attended to during the exhibi-tion, and cages will be provided. But cats are receivedfor exhibition only upon the express condition that theshow will not be responsible for any loss of or damageto cats, boxes, baskets, cages, etc., that may happenfrom any cause whatever during the exhibition, or tocats whilst being unpacked, penned or packed, or intransit to or from the show. VII. Exhibitors will be responsible for the correct descrip-tion of the cats they show, and must be careful to enterthem in their proper classes. VIII. Each cat shown must be the bona fide property of theexhibitor, and each cat or pair of kittens can be shownin one class only, except for special prizes. IX. Exhibitors desirous of selling their cats must statethe price, including basket, etc., and t


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Tags:   bookid:angoracathowtobr00jame bookyear:1898 bookdecade:1890 bookcentury:1800 bookauthor:James__Robert_Kent___from_old_catalog__ed bookpublisher:Boston__James_bros_ bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation bookleafnumber:94 bookcollection:library_of_congress bookcollection:biodiversity bookcollection:fedlink BHL Collection BHL Consortium

N 8 B 17.9K C 0 E Jan 1, 1907 F Jul 28, 2014
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Identifier: ourdomesticanima01voog
Title: Our domestic animals, their habits, intelligence and usefulness;
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Voogt, Gos. de Wormeley, Katharine Prescott, tr Burkett, Charles William, 1873- ed
Subjects: Domestic animals
Publisher: Boston, Ginn & Co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation


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s neck meeting theback in a pretty littlecurve, and the beautifulround head with its pointedears give to the seated cat asingularly peaceful air, to whichthe contented expression of its neatlycut face contributes much. Is it sur-prising that the artists eye has beenso struck by this attitude that heshould love to paint the figure of a seated catbeside the old dame knitting near the cradle ina tranquil home ! XII. For and AgainstIn all that we have so far said there is surelyno ground for an injunction against cats; thefors certainly have it all their own way. Butlet us now turn our eyes to the againsts. Wewill take Buffon to witness. He does not sparepoor pussy; he thinks her an animal thatdeserves no confidence ; which should be keptonly from necessity, to guard against anotherunpleasant animal — the mouse. At night,instead of sleeping near its master, contin-ues the learned naturalist, it rambles off,through woods and fields, pursuing and de-stroying game. How many nests it ruins!

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They mean to flingme into the water How Stealthily, treacherously, it creeps along,like the cunning thief it is ! . . . Buffon, as we see, was no friend to cats ;but long before his day they had cruel enemieswho fought them more directly. In 1747Archbishop Clement Augustus of Colognepublished an edict that all cats should havetheir ears cut off. This singular measure wasintended to protect hares and young pheasants.The poor maimed creatures would no longergo marauding, or what is still more probable,the subjects of the prelate would feeltheir affection for the animal cool-ing after such disfigurement.Moreover, every ear not cutoff was subject to a fine ofa quarter of a florin.Madame de Custine, agreat friend of cats, tookup their defense. Shewrote, among others, toChampfleury, anotherfriend of pussy, saying thatthey deserved to be placedbefore dogs, whose attachmentand fidelity was too mechanical,whereas we could not too much ad-mire the independence of cats. There are many extravagan


Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Tags:   bookid:ourdomesticanima01voog bookyear:1907 bookdecade:1900 bookcentury:1900 bookauthor:Voogt__Gos__de bookauthor:Wormeley__Katharine_Prescott__tr bookauthor:Burkett__Charles_William__1873__ed booksubject:Domestic_animals bookpublisher:Boston__Ginn___Co_ bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation bookleafnumber:115 bookcollection:library_of_congress bookcollection:biodiversity bookcollection:fedlink BHL Collection BHL Consortium

N 1 B 577 C 0 E Jan 1, 1907 F Jul 28, 2014
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Identifier: ourdomesticanima01voog
Title: Our domestic animals, their habits, intelligence and usefulness;
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Voogt, Gos. de Wormeley, Katharine Prescott, tr Burkett, Charles William, 1873- ed
Subjects: Domestic animals
Publisher: Boston, Ginn & Co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation


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About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.


Text Appearing Before Image:
han dogs intended for the same purpose.Their wooden cages must be perfectly dry,raised some feet above the ground, and verycarefully divided into compartments by meansof iron railings. Each niche should havestraw in winter for bedding, andeach compartment must be sup-plied with a box of sawdust.Cages made of masonry arenaturally the best, beingdryer and easier to clean.Sliding wickets allow ofthe food being pushed inwithout disturbing theanimal or giving it achance to escape. A layerof peat dust placed underthe cages, and also underthe straw, absorbs muchdampness, but it needs to befrequently changed or aired.The breeder for pure bloodwill not obtain satisfactory re-sults for some years, nor untilhe can convince himself of thequalities of his animals. There are certain iirize-winning cats with gene-Anoora Cat ^ ... alogical trees, which would be a joy to the breeder if he could get posses-sion of them. He could then be sure, or nearlysure, of the purity of the blood and of the chances

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OUR DOMESTIC ANIMALS of obtaining trie color and the hair or fur thathe wants. In any case, it is essential to matecats of sound health, and to choose for fatheror mother some more or less known and admired


Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Tags:   bookid:ourdomesticanima01voog bookyear:1907 bookdecade:1900 bookcentury:1900 bookauthor:Voogt__Gos__de bookauthor:Wormeley__Katharine_Prescott__tr bookauthor:Burkett__Charles_William__1873__ed booksubject:Domestic_animals bookpublisher:Boston__Ginn___Co_ bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation bookleafnumber:108 bookcollection:library_of_congress bookcollection:biodiversity bookcollection:fedlink BHL Collection BHL Consortium


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