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User / Snuffy / Sets / Acton, ON
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Excerpt from tohh.maps.arcgis.com:

Villanore
68 Bower Street

Villanore is an example of a brick house with vernacular Victorian architecture with Gothic influences. It was constructed by Alex Secord, a popular and highly esteemed local merchant, who became the factory superintendent at Storey Glove. The house was named in honour of his wife, Lenora Storey, the eldest daughter of the glove factory owner W.H. Storey. An underground steam line from the factory across the road (now the post office) provided heating to the home. The famous Laura Secord was Alex's great aunt.

Tags:   Villanore House 68 Bower Street Acton Ontario Canada Level 1-Photography for Recreation

N 20 B 1.1K C 15 E Nov 7, 2020 F Nov 12, 2020
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Excerpt from historicplaces.ca:

Description of Historic Place
The Syndicate Housing Heritage Conservation District consists of ten semi-detached 19th century brick working class residences located on the north side of Bower Street between Elgin Street and Frederick Street in Acton, Town of Halton Hills.

The district was designated by the Town of Halton Hills in 2005 for its heritage value under Part V of the Ontario Heritage Act (By-law 2005-0021).

Heritage Value
The Syndicate Housing Heritage Conservation District reflects an effort by leading industrialists in the Village of Acton to provide services for the growing community. In January 1882, the Acton Banking Company was founded by industrialist William H. Storey, providing the community with its own financial institution. Shortly after this, the Beardmore Tannery announced in March that it would need about 50 tenement houses for its employees. These needs may have prompted the newly formed Acton Banking Company to establish the Acton Building Association to meet the community's housing needs. The ten tenements on Bower Street were built without delay commencing in the summer of 1882 and were of excellent workmanship.

Located uniformly along Bower Street, the ten semi-detached residences of the Syndicate Housing Heritage Conservation District provide a visual reminder of the growth of industry in Acton in the late 19th century. The houses also reflect architectural features common at the time of their construction. They are characterised by symmetrical facades, flat roofs, elaborate brickwork with contrasting colours and patterns and tall windows featuring a rounded brick arch along with similarly adorned bay windows. Brick detailing such as the belt courses of yellow, red and black bricks distinguish the worker houses from each other.

Character-Defining Elements
Character defining elements that contribute to the design or physical value of the Syndicate Housing HCD include the:
- two storey red brick exteriors
- flat roofs
- contrasting brick colours
- voussoirs above windows and doors
- bay windows
- yellow brick quoins
- belt courses of yellow, red and black brick
- double hung, 6 over 2 pane windows
- single light transom
- white wood trim surrounding all windows
- location on the north side of Bower Street
- uninterrupted streetscape
- uniform setback and spacing between the houses

Tags:   69-89 Bower Street Syndicate Housing Heritage Conservation District Acton Ontario Canada Conservation Districts

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Excerpt from historicplaces.ca:

Description of Historic Place
Acton Town Hall, located at 19 Willow Street North, is on the east side of Willow Street North, north of Mill Street East, in Acton, Town of Halton Hills. The two storey brick building was constructed from 1882 to 1883.

The property was designated by the Town of Halton Hills in 1989 for its heritage value under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act (By-law 1989-0012).

Heritage Value
Acton Town Hall is associated with Acton's early development as a community. Completed in 1883, it provided space for town functions and organizations. It held the Council chambers, the Acton Brass Band, the Acton Library, the Acton Fire Brigade and the Provincial Police. The second storey operated as a Concert Hall. The building was a central part of the community until 1974 when the Town of Halton Hills was established through the amalgamation of Acton and other surrounding communities. At that point, the centre of government shifted. Nevertheless, Acton Town Hall remains a central part of Acton's cultural and administrative activity and continues to be used as a structure which serves its community.

The Acton Town Hall was designed by the architects James, Mallory and Mallory of Toronto and the structure was built by W.M. McCulla of Brampton. The building is a good representation of the Italianate style of architecture in a public building although the symmetrical design is uncommon to the style. The boxed cornice with shaped wood brackets, belfry tower, circular rose style window in the gable peak, and tall arched windows are typical of the Italianate style. The truncated hip roof projects a central pediment in gable form above the roofline surmounted by the belfry tower. The central entrance is framed by an arched radiating voussoir which carries down the sides of the opening to form a moulded base. Brick pilasters are located on either side of the glass panelled door which is surrounded by sidelights and a transom.

Character-Defining Elements
Character defining elements that contribute to the design or physical value of Acton Town Hall include its:
- two storey brick exterior
- truncated hip roof
- coursed cut stone foundation
- two storey wrap around addition
- belfry tower
- four brick chimneys
- boxed cornice with wood brackets
- wood trim under eaves
- symmetrical facade
- central gable pediment
- orange replacement bricks
- three sets of string courses
- radiating voussoir surrounding facade entrance
- brick pilasters
- arched windows
- radiating voussoirs with cast stone keystones over windows
- projecting balustrade
- circular rose style window with moulded stone bar below

Tags:   Acton Town Hall 19 Willow Street North Acton Ontario Canada

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Excerpt from tohh.maps.arcgis.com:

St. Alban's Anglican Church
19 St. Alban's Drive

Saint Alban the Martyr was established in 1870. The Sharp family donated this land to "The Church of England in the Dominion of Canada". The Church building was consecrated by Bishop Fuller in 1876. In 1899, the bell tower was installed as well as electric lights. The Parish Hall, built in 1951, is Tudor style architecture made from stucco and wood with an open bell cupola.

Tags:   Anglican Church of St. Alban the Martyr 19 St. Alban's Drive Acton Ontario Canada Places of Worship

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Excerpt from tohh.maps.arcgis.com:

Former Knox Manse
39 Willow Street North

Associated with Knox Presbyterian Church on Main Street, the manse was built in 1889 on the property of the original home of Rufus Adams and family, founders of Acton. Originally occupied by Reverend and Mrs. Rae of Knox Church, it served the Acton ministers until 1987, when it was auctioned for $163,000. The money was invested to provide a housing allowance for the minister. This two-storey, five bedroom house is built in the Queen Anne style of architecture and includes stone sills, brick design, and gingerbread detailing on the roof gable, and corner porch.

Tags:   Knox Manse 39 Willow Street North Acton Ontario Canada Places of Worship


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