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User / Snuffy / Sets / Glen Williams, ON
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Excerpt from historicplaces.ca:

Description of Historic Place
Glen Williams Town Hall, located at 1 Prince Street, is on the south side of Prince Street east of Main Street, in Glen Williams Town of Halton Hills. The one storey red clay brick building was constructed in 1871.

The property was designated by the Town of Halton Hills in 2008 for its heritage value under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act (By-law 2008-0004).

Heritage Value
Glen Williams Town Hall is associated with the Good Templars of Royal Oak Temple who approached Charles Williams for a piece of land for a community hall which they could also use for their temperance society meetings. Charles Williams deeded the land to nine trustees to be held in trust for the community. Built from 1870 to 1871 by Georgetown builder Walter McKay, Glen Williams Town Hall has housed numerous societies, churches, political meetings and acted as a polling station for elections.

In the twentieth century the hall provided the stage for dances and Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery who staged many works there with her Union Dramatic Players. In 1949 classes opened in the Town Hall, and in 1953 the building was officially leased to the Board of Education. After the school was relocated, the Town Hall was returned to the community. In 1976, the Town Hall was restored and in 1981 it returned to the original system whereby trustees oversaw its administration. Annual elections are currently held to select these nine trustees who are the legal owners of the building during their time of office. Glen Williams Town Hall continues to play an important role in community life.

Glen Williams Town Hall is a good representation of the Colonial “Cape Cod” style built out of small, hand pressed red clay brick made just north of Glen Williams. The hall's small stature, symmetrical facade with central entrance and multi-paned windows reflect the Colonial “Cape Cod” style. Also in keeping with the style, the building has little ornamentation.

Character-Defining Elements
Character defining elements that contribute to the heritage value of Glen Williams Town Hall include its:
- one storey red clay brick exterior
- 8.5 inch by 2.5 inch hand-pressed red clay brick
- gable roof
- 9 over 9 windows divided by wood muntins
- heavy wood window sill
- radiating voussoirs
- two wood entrance doors protected by a vestibule
- gable return
- plain bargeboard

Tags:   Town Hall 1 Prince Street Glen Williams Halton Hills Ontario Canada

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Excerpt from copperkettle.ca:

Built in 1852, this building was originally home of the Wheeler General Store selling everything from dry goods and shoes to paper and stamps. Imagine Olsen’s Merchantile from Walnut Grove. Three generations of the Wheeler Family ran the store that also served as a post office from 1852 to 1972. There has been some type of store here until the 1970s. Since then the building had been used for an antique shop, a surf shop and a tea room.

Wheeler General Store prided itself on being a ‘dry’ store serving no alcohol, unlike the shop across the street. In fact, the store-keeper, Rufus McCrea, was instrumental in getting the Town Hall built next door in 1871 and included among its activities meetings of the local Temperance Society.

Ironically, the building eventually became the Copper Kettle Pub serving customers for over twenty years. In 2016, ownership changed hands and the Copper Kettle Pub has been lovingly renovated to bring it back to its former glory as a community hot spot and a ‘must see’ destination for tourists and travelers.

Tags:   Copper Kettle Pub Glen Williams Halton Hills Ontario Canada 517 Main Street

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Excerpt from pub-haltonhills.escribemeetings.com:

The village of Glen Williams is believed to have established a school in 1830. The early schools were usually in the home of one of the families involved. As the number of scholars rose (a fee was payable) the need for a separate building arose. Asmall frame and plaster building, which still stands east of 6Prince Street, is believed to have been built as the school housein 1837. In 1840 John Collingwasthe school teacher.

Tags:   First School House 6 Prince Street Glen Williams Ontario Canada

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Excerpt from glenwilliams.org:

Located on the banks of the Credit River on Main Street, Saint Alban’s was built by local Anglicans and opened in 1902 against the Bishop’s wishes. It has a resident minister and a very active congregation with a strong sense of community spirit. The many events and activities that take place in the church, hall, and extensive grounds are well attended by the neighbourhood and help shape the cohesive character of the village.

Tags:   St. Alban the Martyr Anglican Church 537 Main Street Glen Williams Ontario Canada Places of Worship

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Excerpt from campaignlive.co.uk:

The mementos in question are fake tiger tails from the early 60s, when motorists all over the world were tying them to the caps of their petrol tanks and sporting bumper stickers that declared: "I've got a tiger in my tank."

The fact that some 2.5 million tails were sold in the US alone - and that they're still in demand - is testimony to the durability of the campaign that convinced drivers that Esso fuel was so powerful that it was the equivalent of having a huge beast in their petrol tanks.

"Put a tiger in your tank" was a slogan created in 1959 by Emery Smith, a young Chicago copywriter who had been briefed to produce a newspaper ad to boost sales of Esso Extra.

The tiger wasn't Smith's invention. He'd first appeared as a mascot for Esso in Norway around the turn of the 20th century. But it wasn't until the end of the Second World War - and the resumption of petrol advertising - that the tiger made his US debut.

He was a very different character back then. Cute, amiable and in cartoon form, he closely resembled Tigger in Winnie-the-Pooh and was intended to represent a new post-war optimism after years of shortages. He also gave an identifiable face to Esso in a market where brand differentiation has never been easy.

It was in 1964 that the character really hit his stride with a campaign developed by McCann Erickson. As Esso sales soared and the advertising be-came the talk of adland, Time magazine declared 1964 to be "The Year of the Tiger" along Madison Avenue.

The oil crisis of the early 70s put a stop to any conspicuous petrol consumption and, with little advertising activity taking place, Esso switched its efforts to promoting its pioneering role in North Sea oil exploration.

The task of reflecting this change of emphasis in advertising terms fell to the long-serving McCann senior creative Chester Posey. He chose to represent the new global reality for the newly named Exxon Mobil by swapping the cartoon tiger for a real one and the line: "We're changing our name, but not our stripes."

Tags:   1956 Oldsmobile Glen Williams Ontario Canada Oldsmobile HAPPYDAY


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