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User / Snuffy / Sets / Burlington Central Library, Burlington, ON
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Excerpt from doorsopenontario.on.ca:

Constructed in 1970 by architects Brook, Carruthers, Grierson, Shaw, this award-winning building provides a glimpse inside one of Burlington’s finest examples of brutalist/modernist architecture. The library, as a community space, is free for everyone and offers books, movies, music, magazines and more!

Tags:   Burlington Central Library 2331 New Street Burlington Ontario Canada

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Excerpt from bpl.on.ca:

One of the constants in the lives of village residents was the 1,000 pound town bell, which was purchased in 1894 and hung in the old town hall on Elizabeth St. In those days not many people had clocks or watches, so the bell would ring at 7am when workers would start work, noon and 1pm to signal the start and end of the lunch hour, and 6pm when it was time to go home. When rung quickly, it meant there was a fire and alerted the town’s fire department. The first bell ringer, James Powell, was paid $50 a year in the first years; eventually this duty was included in those of the custodian of the Town Hall.

The bell was located in the bell tower of the Town Hall on the east side of Elizabeth Street, between James and Maria. In 1916, when the Town Council decided to join the other Halton municipalities in adopting Daylight Savings Time, the bell ringer cooperated for the first two weeks; however, there was opposition, and within two weeks the bell ringer reverted to the previous schedule.

When the Town offices moved to Brant Street in 1952, the Elizabeth Street building was sold to the Boy Scouts. Service to the bell was cut when the city decided it was too expensive to pay the bell ringer $250/year, so it went into storage. The bell tower was demolished and the bell was stored in a field at the Boy Scout Camp in Lowville. The bell served the Town for over 50 years.

One night it was stolen from its storage place in Lowville. Not long after the authorities were notified, they saw a car riding very low to the road—and when they pulled it over, the bell was inside. The thieves were taking it to a foundry to have it melted down.

The bell was then stored behind the Works Department yard until the early 1960s when William Gilbert, Chair of the Library Board, raised $1,400 to install the bell in front of the Elizabeth Street Library, across the street from where the old town hall had been located.

The Library's fundraising campaign was completed in 1962, and the bell remained with the Library as it moved to New Street in 1970. Plans for the opening ceremony included having Governor General Roland Michener ring the bell to signify the opening of the building. Because Canada was in the midst of the FLQ crises at that time, the Governor General’s security detail refused to allow the Governor General to perform this task, so Michael Rose, son of the Library Board Chair, rang the bell instead. Michael rang the bell again in 2005, at the reopening of the renovated building.

The bell, which likely heralded the final Armistice of 1918, officially sounded at 4.59pm on Sun November 11, 2018 as part of the local Bells of Peace event. Jane Richardson, an officer of the Royal Canadian Legion Burlington Branch 60, joined by local Cadets, presided over the public sunset ceremony. The national Bells of Peace initiative was developed by the Royal Canadian Legion in partnership with the Government of Canada to commemorate the centenary of the end of the First World War.

Tags:   Burlington Central Library 2331 New Street Burlington Ontario Canada Bell

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Excerpt from burlingtonculturalmap.ca:

Magic Light
Panchal Mansaram, 1994 (installed 2014)
Colour xerography on paper and wood

Magic Light was inspired by Hidden Valley Park. Mansaram noticed the beautiful light in the park and took the photograph that is the starting point for this artwork. The piece was created using a technique called xerography, one of the first forms of photocopying. Starting with photographs, the artist copied and manipulated the images to create a multi-layered collage effect. Magic Light was donated to the City of Burlington’s Public Art Collection by local artist Panchal Mansaram.

Tags:   Magic Light Burlington Public Art Burlington Central Library 2331 New Street Burlington Ontario Canada Panchal Mansaram

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Excerpt from burlingtonculturalmap.ca:

Landscape Watchers
Panchal Mansaram, 1996 (installed 2014)
Colour xerography on paper and wood

Landscape Watchers was inspired by the Burlington landscape and the natural life found in the artist’s own backyard. The artwork was created using a technique called xerography, one of the first forms of photocopying. Starting with photographs, the artist copied and manipulated the images to create a multi-layered collage effect. Landscape Watchers was donated to the City of Burlington’s Public Art Collection by local artist Panchal Mansaram.

Tags:   Landscape Watchers Burlington Public Art Burlington Central Library 2331 New Street Burlington Ontario Canada Panchal Mansaram

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Excerpt from burlingtonculturalmap.ca:

Winged Man
Louis Archambault, c. 1970
Bronze sculpture on a concrete plinth

Winged Man was donated to the City of Burlington’s Public Art Collection by the Canadian Federation of University Women. The sculpture was originally located in Spencer Smith Park before it was relocated to Burlington Central Library. Employing weight, form and empty space, Winged Man is geometric and mystical. Archambault uses bronze in non-traditional ways, leaving the meaning of the sculpture open to interpretation by the viewer. An identical bronze casting of this work is found in the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts collection. Louis Archambault (1915 - 2003) was an active and influential modern sculptor in Canada. The artist was awarded the Centennial Medal in 1967 and the Order of Canada in 1968.

Tags:   Winged Man Burlington Public Art Burlington Central Library 2331 New Street Burlington Ontario Canada Louis Archambault


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