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User / Snuffy / Sets / Prince Edward Island
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N 14 B 1.7K C 23 E Feb 24, 2006 F Jul 16, 2018
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Excerpt from Wikipedia:

Province House is where the Prince Edward Island Legislature, known as the Legislative Assembly of Prince Edward Island, has met since 1847. It is Canada's second-oldest seat of government.

The cornerstone was laid in May 1843 and it commenced operation for the first time in January 1847. The entire structure was built for a cost of £10,000 and was designed by Isaac Smith. Smith was a self-trained architect from Yorkshire, who also designed the residence of the Lieutenant Governor of Prince Edward Island. It was built by Island craftsmen during a time of prosperity for the colony. Its architectural lines include Greek and Roman influences, common to public buildings in North America built during this era.

From September 1–7, 1864, Province House had an important role in helping Prince Edward Island host the Charlottetown Conference which resulted in Canadian Confederation.

Province House was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1973. It is one of only three provincial legislative buildings, along with Province House in Halifax and the Saskatchewan Legislative Building in Regina, to be so designated. Province House is also designated under the provincial Heritage Places Protection Act.

Tags:   Prince Edward Island Charlottetown Province House National Historic Site PEI 165 Richmond Street Canada

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Excerpt from Wikipedia:

The Wood Islands Lighthouse (centre) is a historic lighthouse situated on the southeastern shore of Prince Edward Island, located in the community of Wood Islands. The lighthouse is a well-preserved three storey tower with an adjoining ​1 1⁄2-storey keeper's residence. The white shingled tower is topped by a red iron lantern, which is enclosed by a white railing on the observation deck. The red roof of the dwelling provides a striking contrast to the white shingled exterior of the dwelling.

It was one of the last three lights on Prince Edward Island to be fully automated, and the last where the keeper and his family lived. The lighthouse and residence are now open as a museum, with exhibits about the history of lighthouses, ferry service and fishing on the island, and includes a 1950s period kitchen and keeper's quarters.

Excerpt from peilighthousesociety.ca:

The Wood Island Lighthouse was the second lighthouse built after Prince Edward Island came under the control of the Federal Department of Marine and Fisheries in 1873. This meant it was built in the second generation style with a square tapered tower and an attached one and a half storey dwelling.

The tower is a wooden structure standing 16.5m (54ft) in height from base to vane. It is clad in cedar shingles. An interesting feature of the lantern is the fact that the metal base is square, while the glass part of the lantern is octagonal. The light shows a full 360 degrees. The vent on the top of the lantern is a round ball rather than the usual funnel shape. It has a lantern deck surrounded by cross braced railing painted red. The lantern deck is supported by an elegant curved cornice topped with a bright red fascia. The windows and door on the tower are topped with red pediments.

The one and a half storey dwelling is 25 feet high.The first floor has a kitchen, parlour, and two bedrooms. There were four bedrooms on the second floor. The windows on the main floor of the dwelling are similar to those on the tower, but are not topped with pediments. There are similar but shorter windows on the second story. The stair railing on the dwelling and the tower match the cross braced railing on the lantern deck. The dwelling has a broad bargeboard and fascia (edging) around the roof.

Today the lighthouse is an interpretive museum with 11 restored rooms featuring historic displays and a gift shop.

Historic Data:

Donald Duncan MacMillan was the first person to own a kerosene lamp in Wood Islands. He was known to always keep it burning in an upstairs window to aid those who sailed the Northunberland Strait.

During the session of 1874, Parliament allotted $6,000 for construction of a lighthouse at Wood Islands. Archibald MacKay of Moncton, New Brunswick signed a contract to construct the lighthouse for $3,000. He made little progress in 1875 and eventually abandoned work on the lighthouse. For his efforts he received $900. Donald MacMillian, a local master carpenter, was hired to complete the lighthouse.

The light was put into operation on November 1, 1876.

An additional window was added to the west elevation and the shed roof on the northernmost wing was changed to a gable roof sometime after 1914.

Prior to the construction of the ferry wharf, that began in 1937, the Wood Islands Lighthouse was used mainly to aid marine traffic in the Northumberland Strait and fishing boats in and around Wood Islands Harbour. Since 1940 this coastal light has also been used by Northumberland Ferries Limited for their seasonal ferry service between Wood Islands and Caribou, Nova Scotia.

The range lights which had been established in September 1902, were moved to the southern pier at the harbour entrance in 1940. At the same time the main light was then reglazed and a 360 degree 7th order lens was installed for the benefit of the ferry service.

The dwelling deteriorated over the years. A new single dwelling was tendered in 1968, but the project was cancelled because of the stations' proximety to the town. In the fall of 1980, the Coast Guard placed a double -wide prefabricated bungalow at the site for Leon Patton who moved into it in the spring of 1981. This dwelling (built in 196 for $30,000) was moved to the site from Caribou, Nova Scotia. It was removed in December 1991 when Leon Patton, the second last keeper on the Island, retired.

In 1984 the bottom floor of the tower was renovated when a generator and fog alarm equipment were installed. The room was drywalled, a steel door was installed, switching equipment was mounted on the walls, some windows were changed to accomodate ventilators and a halon fire alarm system was installed. A balcony was built in 1984 to accommodate the fog alarm equipment which removed in 1998. The balcony was removed in 2002.

It was one of the last three lights on Prince Edward Island to be fully automated, and the last where the keeper and his family lived.

Recognized as federal heritage building in 1992, it was moved inland 70m (230 feet) in 2009 because of erosion.The Wood Islands Area Development Corporation opened the Lighthouse in 1998.Today there are eleven rooms of displays as well as a gift shop.

In the summer of 2012, the two decommissioned range lights were moved to the grounds of the lighthouse.

Wood Islands Back Range Light (right):

The Wood Islands Back Range Light has a square tapered wooden tower, 9.7m (32ft) from base to vane. It has a square lantern with a large window facing seaward and a smaller window on the east side. A narrrow wooden deck is surmounted on the tower and is surrounded by a cross-braced railing supported by simple wooden brackets. The red striped vertical day mark on its seaward side was removed when this range light was decomissioned in 2007.

Historic Data:

In 1902, the Wood Islands Back Range Light was constructed overlooking the Northumberland Strait that leads into Wood Islands Harbour. It was useful to the fishing fleet and Northumberland Ferries Limited after 1940.

It is believed that the range light was moved about 1940 when construction of the ferry terminal at Wood Islands began.

This Back Range Light was decommissioned in 2007.

In 2013 this range light was moved to the lighthouse site.

Wood Islands Front Range Light (left):

The Wood Islands Front Range Light has a shingled square wooden tower measuring 5.8m (19 feet) from base to vane. It has a slope-walled attached shed and a gable roof over its door. At one point it housed the fog alarm. The red striped vertical day mark on its seaward side was removed when this range light was decomissioned in 2007.

Historic Data:

At one time the range light was not much more than an enclosed frame, surmounted by a square lantern. It later acquired a slope-walled attached shed and gable roof over its door.

In 1902, the Wood Islands Front Range Light was constructed overlooking the Northumberland Strait leading into Wood Islands Harbour. It was modeled after the Bras d'Or, Nova Scotia and Stribling, Ontario lights. This range was a square, wooden tower with cedar shingles, painted white with red trim and a red vertical stripe on the range line.

It was useful to the fishing fleet and Northumberland Ferries Limited after 1940.

This range light was moved about 1940 when construction of the ferry terminal at Wood Islands began.

This Front Range Light was decommissioned in 2007.

In 2013 this range light was moved to the lighthouse site.

Tags:   canada Prince Edward Island Wood Islands Lighthouse Lighthouse Wood Islands Back Range Light Wood Islands Front Range Light Wood Islands Provincial Park Provincial Park Points East Coastal Drive PEI Lighthouse

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East Point is located at the easternmost point of Prince Edward Island. The lighthouse was built entirely from PEI timber.

Excerpt from eastpointlighthouse.ca:

The East Point Lighthouse also has the distinction of being “Canada’s Confederation Lighthouse” having been the only Lighthouse in Canada that was built in 1867 and still operates today.

Excerpt from peilighthousesociety.ca:

Because of its location at the extreme eastern tip of the Island, there is glass all around the lantern allowing the light to be seen for 360 degrees.

It is constructed with heavy hewn timber with a shingled exterior. It has a well-proportioned facia at the top of the tower and a cross braced wooden railing. The windows and door are topped by triangular pediments trimmed red. The interior has three landings and 67 steps. It’s the last of the Colonial lighthouses to be built on PEI. It stands 19.5m (64 feet) tall.

Historic Data:

During the busy shipping years of the mid-1800’s, there was a pressing need for lighthouses, which the Island’s Colonial Government was unable to afford. James Warburton, Colonial Secretary, sent a report of the House of Assembly of Prince Edward Island dated May 12th, 1851, to the Government of Canada, which suggested Canada, the British North American colonies, the United States and even Great Britain provide “proportionate contributions” toward the construction of lighthouses at North Cape and East Point, as the lighthouses at these locations “would be of greater utility to the Shipping interests of the Countries referred to than to the similar interests of this colony.”

Petitions from area residents were presented and tabled by Prince Edward Island’s committee on lighthouses. In 1861, George Dundas, Lieutenant-Governor of Prince Edward Island wrote to the Governor General Head in Ottawa, insisting that immediate measures be taken at North Cape and East Point because of the many accidents occurring at these two locations. Dundas’ request was passed on to Public Works who suggested to the Governor to request from Prince Edward Island the likely cost of each lighthouse, and how much of the cost the province itself would look after. It was only when residents at North Cape rigged a portable lamp on a makeshift stage in 1865, that £500 was allotted for the construction of a tower at North Cape. A year later, money was allotted for the construction of a tower at East Point. W.H. Pope was paid £25 for his efforts in obtaining grants from Canada and New Brunswick to help offset the cost of construction of the East Point tower.

The East Point Lighthouse, built in 1866-67, is a major coastal light that serves all marine traffic using the Canso Strait to the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

The East Point Lighthouse and the lightkeeper’s dwelling were built by William MacDonald. The keeper’s cottage was also completed in 1867 with additions in 1885 and a replacement in 1923. The strong timbers have withstood the test of time for over 140 years. The lighthouse was moved twice. The tower was built about a 0.8 km (half mile) inland from its designated mark on the charts.

On September 12th, 1882, the 1,137 ton British warship, HMS Phoenix ran upon a reef off East Point. Although the blame was put on the “negligent navigation” of the Phoenix, many believed that the location of the lighthouse was the real cause of the misfortune. Charts showed the Lighthouse on a point, while, in fact, the Lighthouse had been built approximately half a mile inland. As a result, in 1885 the Lighthouse and keeper’s cottage were moved 1600 feet east, to within 200 feet of the edge of the point.

There is conflicting information about the fog alarm building. Federal Heritage Review Board Report 90-256 states that the fog alarm building was built in 1885 as a one-storey structure with a T-shaped formation. The fog horns sprouted from the hipped roof of the “leg” of the T. In 1908, an engineer’s room and 50-foot chimney were added and the T-leg of the original building was removed. Doors and windows were also altered.

Other information says that a new structure was built in 1908 at a cost of $8,000.00 and the old building was moved back and used as a storehouse. In 1908 the lighthouse was moved back 200 feet from the point so it wouldn’t interfere with the fog alarm signal. Because of erosion the fog alarm building was moved closer to the lighthouse in 2008. It houses a gift shop and canteen.

In the 1960s, a fog detection service balcony was added to the lighthouse and one window was converted to a doorway. The balcony was removed in 2002. The generator was removed in 2000, and the fresnel lens was replaced by a beacon of lower intensity. Other than minor changes, the tower exterior is in almost original condition.

There have been many changes to the light station buildings. In 1923, a two-storey house was built to replace the original dwelling. An addition was made to the house in 1949-50. In 1966, two new three-bedroom dwellings for assistant keepers were completed. These have been sold but have remained in their original location. The older residence was declared surplus and removed after it partially burned in 1972. The keeper was badly burned in that incident.

Moved twice, its fourth order lens was removed in 2000 and replaced by a modern optic.

Tags:   Prince Edward Island Divine Captures East Point Lighthouse PEI Points East Coastal Drive Lighthouse PEI Lighthouse Canada Photography Vision

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Excerpt from Wikipedia:

The Confederation Bridge (French: Pont de la Confédération) spans the Abegweit Passage of Northumberland Strait. It links Prince Edward Island with mainland New Brunswick, Canada. Before its official naming, Prince Edward Islanders often referred to the bridge as the "Fixed Link". Construction took place from October 1993 to May 1997 and cost C$1.3 billion. The 12.9-kilometre (8 mi) bridge opened on May 31, 1997.

Tags:   Confederation Bridge New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Canada PEI Pont de la Confédération Abegweit Passage Northumberland Strait Aerial View Music to My Eyes

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Excerpt from Wikipedia:

The Hillsborough River Bridge is a bridge crossing the Hillsborough River estuary between Charlottetown and Stratford in Queens County, Prince Edward Island. The current road bridge, built in 1962, replaced a 1905 rail bridge crossing the same span which was known by the same name.

The first bridge was built by the Prince Edward Island Railway to complete a rail line from Charlottetown to Murray River. The single-lane bridge opened in 1905, and incorporated iron spans from two bridges in Miramichi, New Brunswick built about 30 years earlier. As rail service in the province was converted to standard gauge and heavier service, use of the bridge declined until it was deemed unsafe for all traffic in the 1950s.

As the Trans-Canada Highway project was planned in the 1950s, improving the crossing of the Hillsborough River was deemed essential. A new, improved 2-lane road bridge was built immediately upstream of the old rail bridge, opening in 1962. The bridge was widened to carry 4 lanes of traffic in 1995.

Tags:   Charlottetown Prince Edward Island Canada PEI Hillsborough River Hillsborough Bridge Trans-Canada Highway Highway 1 Level 1 The Best of Day


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