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Tags:   311 Bay Street South Hamilton Ontario Canada

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Excerpt from historicalhamilton.com:

Built in 1890, Malloch House (301 Bay Street South) occupies a prominent spot on the southeast corner of Bay St. South and Markland. Originally, the front door was on Bay Street, but later was bricked in and moved to Markland. Its design is a mix of Victorian and Queen Anne. Mr. Malloch's brother-in-law built his home next door to the south.

Excerpt from uwaterloo.ca:

Description of the District

The Durand-Markland Heritage Conservation District runs along Markland Street and includes Park Street and MacNab Street between Markland Street and Herkimer. Chilton Place is also included.

The Durand-Markland Heritage Conservation District is found in the City of Hamilton and consists of 51 residential properties.

Cultural Heritage Value of the District

The Heritage Conservation District Plan describes the heritage character as:
“Although a few residents were built in the 1850s and 1860s, the Durand-Markland study area is characterized by a predominance of late nineteenth century to early twentieth century building construction. There is a range and diversity of structures from small, vernacular worker’s cottages to large classically detailed houses of the upper middle class.

The most prominent architectural styles are nineteenth century Italianate(1850-1900), and Queen Anne (1880-1910), and twentieth century Tudor Revival (1900-1930s). Examples of such architectural styles as Second Empire (1860-1880), Colonial Revival (1900-present), Edwardian Classicism (1900-1930), and four-square (1900-1930) are also represented in the district ”.

It goes on to state:
“The distinctive architectural features of the area are its scale, mass, decorative
detailing and building sitting. Remarkably few individual buildings and properties have been extensively altered or subdivided over time due to changing tastes, economics and fashion The overall nineteenth century residential character coupled with a distinctive treeline and canopied streetscapes have generally been retained and occasionally enhanced”.

Designation of the District

The designation of Durand-Markland was initiated by local residents. Unterman McPhail Cumming Associates Heritage Conservation and Planning Consultants and Wendy Shearer Landscape Architect Limited completed the plan in 1994 for the City of Hamilton.

The Durand-Markland Heritage Conservation District is protected by By-law 94-184, which was passed in 1994 by the City of Hamilton.

Tags:   Malloch House 301 Bay Street South Durand-Markland Heritage Conservation District Hamilton Ontario Canada Conservation Districts Conservation Districts Hamilton

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Excerpt from uwaterloo.ca:

Description of the District
St. Clair Avenue Heritage Conservation District runs along St. Clair Avenue between Main Street and Delaware Avenue. The district consists of 23 properties. Twenty-one of these properties are residential and two are commercial.

Cultural Heritage Value of the District
The Heritage Conservation District Planning Study summarizes the value of the district in three points:
• Area has relatively significant historical/architectural structures that represent early 20th century architecture.
• Area was first developed in 1912 on the west side of the avenue, and development on the east side started in 1923.
• Original homeowners were significant individuals in the City of Hamilton.

Designation of the District
The designation of St. Clair Avenue Heritage Conservation District was initiated by the local residents association. According to the planning study, “The St. Clair Heritage District Planning Study evolved from the interest and effort of the St. Clair Homeowners Association and was encouraged by the Hamilton-Wentworth
Regional Planning and Development Department”. The district is protected by By-law 86-125, passed in 1986.

Tags:   131 St. Clair Avenue St. Clair Avenue Heritage Conservation District Hamilton Ontario Canada Conservation Districts Conservation Districts Hamilton

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Excerpt from uwaterloo.ca:

Description of the District
St. Clair Avenue Heritage Conservation District runs along St. Clair Avenue between Main Street and Delaware Avenue. The district consists of 23 properties. Twenty-one of these properties are residential and two are commercial.

Cultural Heritage Value of the District
The Heritage Conservation District Planning Study summarizes the value of the district in three points:
• Area has relatively significant historical/architectural structures that represent early 20th century architecture.
• Area was first developed in 1912 on the west side of the avenue, and development on the east side started in 1923.
• Original homeowners were significant individuals in the City of Hamilton.

Designation of the District
The designation of St. Clair Avenue Heritage Conservation District was initiated by the local residents association. According to the planning study, “The St. Clair Heritage District Planning Study evolved from the interest and effort of the St. Clair Homeowners Association and was encouraged by the Hamilton-Wentworth
Regional Planning and Development Department”. The district is protected by By-law 86-125, passed in 1986.

Tags:   141 St. Clair Avenue St. Clair Avenue Heritage Conservation District Hamilton Ontario Canada Conservation Districts Conservation Districts Hamilton

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Excerpt from cbc.ca:

Mary Wiens · CBC News · Posted: Jul 20, 2017 11:00 AM ET | Last Updated: July 20, 2017

Few passengers boarding the subway at Old Mill where it crosses over Humber Park realize that the massive concrete pylons supporting the station have become a series of concrete canvases in the park below.

But walk past the station, down Old Mill Road and turn right into Humber Park, and you'll find Indigenous artist Philip Cote, perched on a scaffold, working on any one of ten murals that transform the pylons into teaching tools for Indigenous history.

Cote's circular murals depicting the Anishinaabe creation story are a public art commission for the Pan Am Path, the 80-kilometre path that will eventually link walking and cycling paths across the city.

For Cote, the murals are a chance to share Indigenous history and science, informed by a spiritual understanding — typical of Indigenous thought.

"The whole idea of this mural is a small seed that's going to get planted and it's going to go somewhere," said Cote. "It's the creation story of the Anishinaabe people, so we're talking about a different way of looking at the world."

"This mural is man's arrival on the land. He's connecting with all the animals," said Cote. "I wanted to show that Indigenous thinking, that everything's connected and we're all on the same path."

The subway bridge was built almost 50 years ago but Cote's murals depict a history preserved through an oral tradition that survived the Ice Age.

Ten murals capture different epochs of Indigenous history, going back more than 13,500 years, like one mural depicting animals that became extinct during the Ice Age. It includes an image of a man called Oh-kwa-ming I-nini-wug, the Anishinaabe word for 'ancient people,' passed down through an oral tradition that western science is only now beginning to accord more respect.

Cote's murals for the Pan Am Path are a partnership with two graffitti artists, Jarus and Kwest.

Tags:   Man's arrival on the Land. He's connecting with All the Animals Circular Murals depicting the Anishinaabe Creation Story Philip Cote Old Mill Station Bridge 2672 Bloor Street West Etobicoke Toronto Ontario Canada Pan Am Path Art Relay Pan Am Games 2015 Pan American Games 2015 Murals Public Arts Indigenous Arts


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