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Excerpt from oakvillehistory.org:

The Granary at 105 Robinson Street: Wheat from the farms of Trafalgar Township and lands to the north, followed timber as the second important commodity for Oakville and its harbour. Dealers in wheat at Oakville were among its most prosperous citizens.

The Granary was built on the site of an earlier warehouse (1836) owned by Alexander Proudfoot, merchant of Trafalgar Township, on Dundas Street. Proudfoot disposed of his Oakville interests, moving to Montreal in the 1850s.

At about that time, essentially on the Proudfoot warehouse site, Romain and MacDougald built this stone warehouse, using limestone ballast brought in by the Lake schooners, and stone from the Lake bottom, harvested by stone hookers. Internally, massive pine timbers support the floors of the building.

The Granary is the only Ontario stone warehouse of its type still standing on its original location.

Tags:   McDougald and Romain The Granary 105 Robinson Street Oakville Ontario Canada

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Tags:   Busby Park 128 Water Street Oakville Ontario Canada Marina Fall Autumn Seasons

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Excerpt from oakvillehistory.org:

William J. Sumner House No. 2 at 65 Navy Street: This, the second house built by William Johnson Sumner, proprietor of the Oakville House, was built a year after the house on William Street.

The two adjacent lots were purchased in 1831 for twenty pounds (about $80, at the exchange rate of the time). In 1839, he sold both homes for one hundred pounds.

It was for William Johnson Sumner that Sumner Avenue in Oakville is named.

Tags:   William J. Sumner House No. 2 65 Navy Street Oakville Ontario Canada

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Excerpt from oakvillehistory.org:

George King Chisholm House (Glen Prossen) at 85 Navy Street: George King Chisholm was born in 1815 at Nelson Township. In 1840, he married Isabella Land, granddaughter of the founder of Hamilton. They had eight children, five of them survived childhood. The family moved to Oakville in 1847 and in 1848 he purchased the lot on which the house stands from the Gore Bank, building the home around the year 1849.

In 1857, the year in which Oakville became a Town, and George King Chisholm it first mayor, he sold the home to Dr. Elwy J. Ogden and his wife Mary and moved to a new home which he had built at his farm west of the Sixteen.

Ogden in his turn sold the home in 1868 to Richard Shaw Wood and Isabella Wood. Wood, a native of Bermuda, had come to Oakville in the 1850s and founded the Oakville Oil Refinery. Wood added to the home to the rear. The addition was supposed to serve as a bank, but there is no evidence that it did.

The home was sold again in 1878 to Mary Ann and Thomas Patterson. Mary Ann was a milliner, Thomas a tailor. Thomas Patterson became mayor of Oakville in 1894.

In the early part of this century the house became the home of Captain Maurice Fitzgerald, a Lake mariner who became a coal and lumber dealer in Oakville. He lived at Glen Prossen until his death in 1931.

Tags:   George King Chisholm House 85 Navy Street Oakville Ontario Canada

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Excerpt from oakvillehistory.org:

The Murray House Hotel, 75 Navy Street: The Murray House Hotel stands on the site of a home of Captain Nicholas Boylan, second master of the “Trafalgar”, the first schooner built at Oakville in the shipyard of William Chisholm. The hotel was built in 1857 by John Williams, brother of Captain Hiram Williams.

It was opened for business on December 15th, 1857. The hotel was originally named the “Canadian Hotel”, and offered its patrons twenty-one bedrooms (but small, many only six feet by six feet) and four parlours. For the security of his customers’ valuables John Williams provided hidden cupboards in the cellar stairways.

John Williams sold the hotel to James Teetor in 1867 (for $2,005) and returned to operating the “Oakville House”, the inn at Navy and Colborne, which he had previously owned. He had also been the proprietor of the “Railway Station Hotel” which he built in 1856.

In 1896 the “Canadian Hotel” returned to Williams’ family, being purchased by Murray Williams, John’s nephew. It was Murray who changed the name to the “Murray House Hotel”, the name it still carries.

Murray Williams brought the hotel back to the standards set by Uncle John, for the establishment had gone downhill under a dozen proprietors since James Teetor.

Standing in lawns, with a fountain playing water in the centre, it was generously supplied by waggon sheds for its customers. But it was Murry Williams who introduced the automobile to Oakville, to begin the demise of the waggon.

Tags:   Murray House Canadian Hotel 75 Navy Street Oakville Ontario Canada


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