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“The word death is not pronounced in New York, in Paris, in London, because it burns the lips. The Mexican, in contrast, is familiar with death, jokes about it, caresses it, sleeps with it, celebrates it, it is one of his favorite toys and his most steadfast love." - Octavio Paz, a native of Mexico and winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize in literature

Halloween is for trick or treating, while the Day of the Dead is an assault on all your senses. I made this photograph while experiencing the Day of the Dead in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

El Dia del Muertos (The Day of the Dead) is a popular celebration throughout Latin America, especially in Mexico. I know zombies are the flavor of the month in today’s popular culture, but that is not what this celebration is about.

The Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday and is celebrated throughout Mexico. Family and friends get together to pray and remember their loved ones who have passed away. This is not a time of mourning, but rather it is a joyful celebration of life, food, friends and family.

The history of the Day of the Dead is a syncretism of Pre-Hispanic and Spanish customs. The celebration takes place on November 1–2, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day (November 1) and All Souls' Day (November 2).

In the beautiful colonial city of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico I was able to take in the sights, sounds and smiles of the Day of the Dead.

On the days leading up to November 1 and 2 (along with celebrating the Catholic holidays, on the 1st, people celebrate the lives of lost children, and on the 2nd they celebrate the spirits of adults) many parties erupted on the streets of San Miguel de Allende.

Happy Travels!

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography 2016

Tags:   Day of the Dead San Miguel de Allende Mexico Portrait Female Tradition Night Scary Sam Antonio Photography halloween death celebration dead day mexican skull woman mask holiday costume background catrina face muertos beauty art makeup traditional culture spooky festival dia beautiful horror girl november christianity catholicism religious calavera creepy culturaltradition spirituality

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“The word death is not pronounced in New York, in Paris, in London, because it burns the lips. The Mexican, in contrast, is familiar with death, jokes about it, caresses it, sleeps with it, celebrates it, it is one of his favorite toys and his most steadfast love." - Octavio Paz, a native of Mexico and winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize in literature

Halloween is for trick or treating, while the Day of the Dead is an assault on all your senses. I made this photograph while experiencing the Day of the Dead in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

El Dia del Muertos (The Day of the Dead) is a popular celebration throughout Latin America, especially in Mexico. I know zombies are the flavor of the month in today’s popular culture, but that is not what this celebration is about.

The Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday and is celebrated throughout Mexico. Family and friends get together to pray and remember their loved ones who have passed away. This is not a time of mourning, but rather it is a joyful celebration of life, food, friends and family.

The history of the Day of the Dead is a syncretism of Pre-Hispanic and Spanish customs. The celebration takes place on November 1–2, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day (November 1) and All Souls' Day (November 2).

In the beautiful colonial city of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico I was able to take in the sights, sounds and smiles of the Day of the Dead.

On the days leading up to November 1 and 2 (along with celebrating the Catholic holidays, on the 1st, people celebrate the lives of lost children, and on the 2nd they celebrate the spirits of adults) many parties erupted on the streets of San Miguel de Allende.

Happy Travels!

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography 2016

Tags:   Day of the Dead San Miguel de Allende Mexico Portrait Female Face Painting Tradition Culture Celebration El Dia de Muertos Sam Antonio Photography mexican halloween scary skull girl woman art mask makeup face costume decoration carnival dead day black paint white catrina muertos beauty spooky holiday death horror skeleton dia dark festival creepy adult mystic tribal mexican culture folklore zombie voodoo nightmare model fashion painted people character traditional

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Halloween is for trick or treating, while the Day of the Dead is an assault on all your senses. I made this photograph while experiencing the Day of the Dead in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

El Dia del Muertos (The Day of the Dead) is a popular celebration throughout Latin America, especially in Mexico. I know zombies are the flavor of the month in today’s popular culture, but that is not what this celebration is about.

The Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday and is celebrated throughout Mexico. Family and friends get together to pray and remember their loved ones who have passed away. This is not a time of mourning, but rather it is a joyful celebration of life, food, friends and family.

The history of the Day of the Dead is a syncretism of Pre-Hispanic and Spanish customs. The celebration takes place on November 1–2, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day (November 1) and All Souls' Day (November 2).

In the beautiful colonial city of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico I was able to take in the sights, sounds and smiles of the Day of the Dead.

On the days leading up to November 1 and 2 (along with celebrating the Catholic holidays, on the 1st, people celebrate the lives of lost children, and on the 2nd they celebrate the spirits of adults) many parties erupted on the streets of San Miguel de Allende.

Happy Travels!

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography 2016

Tags:   San Miguel de Allende Day of the Dead Celebration Dancing El Dia de Muertos Mexico Night Travel Sam Antonio Photography scary halloween love day dead costume couple grim haunted face death crazy walking street urban culture entertainment traditional muertos mexican masquerade spooky holiday portrait woman religion mask makeup catholicism catholic

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Not one, not two, not three...but eight Catrinas!

One of the most iconic images of the Day of the Dead celebration is the La Calavera Catrina, or simply La Catrina. The character of the skeletal high-society woman has come to represent the holiday.

Halloween is for trick or treating, while the Day of the Dead is an assault on all your senses. I made this photograph while experiencing the Day of the Dead in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

El Dia del Muertos (The Day of the Dead) is a popular celebration throughout Latin America, especially in Mexico. I know zombies are the flavor of the month in today’s popular culture, but that is not what this celebration is about.

The Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday and is celebrated throughout Mexico. Family and friends get together to pray and remember their loved ones who have passed away. This is not a time of mourning, but rather it is a joyful celebration of life, food, friends and family.

The history of the Day of the Dead is a syncretism of Pre-Hispanic and Spanish customs. The celebration takes place on November 1–2, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day (November 1) and All Souls' Day (November 2).

In the beautiful colonial city of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico I was able to take in the sights, sounds and smiles of the Day of the Dead.

On the days leading up to November 1 and 2 (along with celebrating the Catholic holidays, on the 1st, people celebrate the lives of lost children, and on the 2nd they celebrate the spirits of adults) many parties erupted on the streets of San Miguel de Allende.

Happy Travels!

Buy my prints here:

www.SamAntonioPhotography.com

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography 2016

Tags:   Day of the Dead San Miguel de Allende El Dia de Muertos Celebration Catrinas Mexico Holiday Tradition Travel Sam Antonio Photography Catrina skeleton mexican spooky death halloween skull religion muertos horror paint spirituality portrait costume fiesta face female beauty makeup zocalo day of dead tourism tourist culturaltradition

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The great photojournalist Robert Capa once stated, “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re probably not close enough.” To understand the people you are photographing you must be in proximity to them. It’s not the camera equipment that makes a successful photograph, but rather the connection you make with people that makes all the difference.

Ansel Adams once said, “You don’t take a photograph, you make it.”

I was in the historical jardin of San Miguel del Allende when I approached this group of people for a photograph. In the first frame I took they simply stared at my camera like zombies (in all fairness they were dressed as dead people). On the next frame I joked around with them for a while and then posed them for this shot.

I didn’t take this photograph, I made it.

Happy Travels!

I now sell my fine art prints online:

www.SamAntonioPhotography.com

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography 2016

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Tags:   Day of the Dead El Dia de Muertos San Miguel de Allende Mexico Catrinas Face Painting Travel Celebration Portrait Sam Antonio Photography dead latino latin cultural mexican day culture holiday skelleton parade tradition hispanic fiesta colorful festival dia mask death muertos make-up religion carnival costume Couple Kiss Trump Candid party


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