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User / www.SamAntonioPhotography.com / Sets / Hola Mexico 2012!
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N 77 B 27.6K C 42 E Oct 24, 2012 F Nov 12, 2012
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For years I have heard about the beauty of Guanajuato, Mexico. Now that I have had the opportunity to visit this lovely city, it has lived up to all of its expectations.

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Guanajuato is a colonial-era city situated in a valley that has a labyrinth of narrow, winding and steep cobblestone streets (there are even streets underground). You are guaranteed to get lost, but that is indeed the charm of the city, to simply wander around to explore the city’s shady plazas, sidewalk cafes, historic monuments and all the while admiring the neoclassical and baroque style colonial architecture.

The University of Guanajuato is located right in the historic center which gives the city a youthful atmosphere (there are over 30,000 enrolled students). At night the city comes alive with its vibrant nightlife and callejoneadas, or walking serenades, led by student musicians who strum guitars, serenade bystanders and recite local tales.

This is a bird’s eye view of the city from The Pipila Monument which can be reached by either bus, hiking a steep trail or funicular. Whatever method you choose you are guaranteed a fantastic view of beautiful Guanajuato!

Happy Travels!

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography

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Tags:   Guanajuato Mexico Twilight Colonial Light Cityscape Architecture Horizontal Outdoors Skyline Church Illuminated Travel Latin America Built Structure City Aerial View High Angle View North America Famous Place Night Color Image No People Photography ©SamAntonio.com Blue Hour Latin Travel Destinations Roof Sky Hill Dusk Building Exterior Civilization Town Vertical House Day Residential Structure Vibrant Color Block. Sam Antonio Travel Photography Most Beautiful City in Mexico

N 72 B 57.5K C 42 E Oct 31, 2012 F Oct 31, 2012
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11/1/2014 - Happy Day of the Dead!

A re-post from my amazing trip to Oaxaca City, Mexico where I photographed the celebration of El Dia del Muertos or The Day of the Dead. Have a great weekend!

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Hola from the colonial city of Merida in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico! I am still processing the photos from my amazing time in photographing the most Mexican holidays, El Dia del Muertos or The Day of the Dead, in Oaxaca City.

The Mexican people believe that the spirits of the dead come back to visit the living on earth, usually this occurs on the 1 and 2 of November and on these nights and others, many families gather in local cemeteries to celebrate the dead. They cover the gravesites with colorful flowers and thousands of candles. Many generations within a family sit around the gravesite and have a party for dead family members. They eat their favorite foods, drink mescal, a liquor made from the agave cactus, and they sing while the mariachis play the deceased’s favorite songs.

Just outside of Oaxaca City is Xoxocotlan Cemetery where you can truly experience The Day of the Dead festivities. On the night of October 31, many local families begin their nightly vigils in this small cemetery, that is densely packed, as they sit by the tombs and wait for the return of the spirits.

I photographed this little boy as he was placing a candle on his deceased relative’s grave. I shot this handheld at 6400 ISO using just the ambient light of the candles.

Happy Travels!

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography

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Tags:   Day of the Dead 2012 El Dia del Muertos Oaxaca Mexico Graveyard Gravesite Candle Natural Light Boy Child People Travel Destinations Square Outdoors Cemetery Day Of The Dead Traditional Culture Tree Fire Autumn Dawn Michoacan State Religion Illuminated Mexican Culture Color Image Medium Group Of People Photography Latin America. Portrait High ISO Full Frame Sensor Oaxaca City Children Portrait Halloween Full Frame' Child Portrait Full Frame Low Light Photography Death Day of the Dead Mexico Day of the Dead Oaxaca Spirits Mescal Ghost Mezcal Dia del Muertos

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I am back from my epic Mexico trip just in time for Thanksgiving here in America! I am still processing the photos from my amazing time in photographing the most Mexican holidays, El Dia del Muertos or The Day of the Dead, in Oaxaca City.

The Mexican people believe that the spirits of the dead come back to visit the living on earth, usually this occurs on the 1 and 2 of November and on these nights and others, many families gather in local cemeteries to celebrate the dead. They cover the gravesites with colorful flowers and thousands of candles. Many generations within a family sit around the gravesite and have a party for dead family members. They eat their favorite foods, drink mescal, a liquor made from the agave cactus, and they sing while the mariachis play the deceased’s favorite songs.

Just outside of Oaxaca City is Xoxocotlan Cemetery where you can truly experience The Day of the Dead festivities. On the night of October 31, many local families begin their nightly vigils in this small cemetery, that is densely packed, as they sit by the tombs and wait for the return of the spirits.

I stood off in the distance observing this family before I approached them and asked permission to take a photo.

“¿Photo, por favor?”

The two gentlemen responded with a nod of approval all the while the two young ladies were completely unaware of my presence since they had their complete attention towards their cell phones and texting as fast as their fingers would allow.

Finally, the older gentlemen on the left started to speak of their deceased relatives and the two young ladies quickly put away their cell phones and gave him their undivided attention.

Of all the photographs I took that evening this one happens to be my favorite. This photograph embodies the essence of El Dia del Muertos with the portrayal of generations of families coming together as one to celebrate, learn and respect the spirits of their deceased relatives.

Photographed with my Canon 5D Mark II and Canon 24-105 f/4 L IS lens at 6400 ISO using just the ambient light of the surrounding candles.

Happy Travels!

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography

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Tags:   Day of the Dead Day of the Dead 2012 El Dia del Muertos Day of the Dead Oaxaca Mexico Mexican Culture Mexican Tradition Travel Photography Portrait Low Light Full Frame Camera High ISO Cemetery Gravesite Night Candle Natural Light Ambient Light Copyright SamAntonio.com Relative People Horizontal Waist Up Mexico Traditional Culture Flower Day Oaxaca Celebration Visit Latin America Holiday Arts Culture and Entertainment Dead Grave Oaxaca City Photographing the Day of the Dead Mexican Men Mexican Women Mexican Girls Spirits Death Memories Outdoors Electric Light Traditional Culture Night Decoration Memorial Marigold Altar Illuminated Canon 5D Mark II Review Sam Antonio Mexico Vacation Mexican Celebration Mexican Traditions November Celebrating the Dead Dead Relatives

N 8 B 23.3K C 23 E Oct 25, 2012 F Nov 26, 2012
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The University of Guanajuato is located right in the historic center of Guanajuato, Mexico which gives the city a youthful atmosphere (there are over 30,000 enrolled students).

I photographed this young woman along one of Guanajuato’s cobblestone streets and her laugh reminded me Steve Jobs' Stanford commencement speech where he told this story to the graduating class.

“When I was young, there was an amazing publication called ‘The Whole Earth Catalog,’ which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960′s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: It was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.”

“Stewart and his team put out several issues of ‘The Whole Earth Catalog,’ and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: ‘Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.’ It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.”

“Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.”

As a wandering travel photographer I have to constantly remind myself to Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. To wander a city as a temporary local and seek new experiences and not have it handed to me from a formulaic tour package. To photograph people as human beings with fascinating stories and not as a cultural backdrop.

I guess this is why I love to travel and photograph, to tell compelling stories and to Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

Happy Travels!

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography

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Tags:   Guanajuato Mexico Candid Street Photography Student Girl Woman Smile Laugh Laughter Portrait Travel Photography Canon 5D Mark II Canon 24-105 Lens ©SamAntonio.com Guanajuato State University of Guanajuato Smiling Happy Expression Young Woman Smiling Young Woman Laughing Stay Hungry Stay Foolish Steve Jobs Stanford Commencement Speech Mexico Travel Creating Travel Portraits Guanajuato City Guanajuato, Mexico EOS 5D Mark II

N 14 B 39.0K C 20 E Nov 1, 2012 F Nov 29, 2012
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One of the highlights of photographing El Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) in Mexico was visiting the small town of San Agustin Etla about ten miles outside of Oaxaca. The town is known for their wild celebrations, outrageous costumes and nonstop Banda music.

Most of the world is familiar with Halloween since it is a huge commercial enterprise, especially in the United States. While death is treated as something to be feared in Halloween tradition, the exact opposite holds true with the Day of the Dead where death is looked upon as a source of celebration.

The Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday and is celebrated throughout Mexico. Family and friends get together to pray and remember their loved ones who have passed away. The celebration takes place on November 1–2, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day (November 1) and All Souls' Day (November 2).

The Day of the Dead celebrations are embodied in the town of San Agustin Etla where my five senses were duly assaulted by outrageous costumes, deafening music, enticing street food and a boisterous party atmosphere.

The evening’s festivities culminated in a friendly town rivalry in which the neighboring town paraded over to San Agustin’s central square to begin a face to face show down. I knew the atmosphere was going to be unhinged when I saw a security squad of men with batons form a human barricade between the two towns.

For a good hour or so the two towns partied on their respective sides of the street trying to outdo one another with flamboyant costumes, riotous dancing and piercing Banda bands. Of course, I happen to be right in the middle of all of it.

I set my camera on a low ISO setting and fired my Canon 550 EX Speedlite flash to “drag the shutter” which gave this scene a sense of motion to convey all the commotion that was happening around me.

After experiencing the Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico, Halloween will never be the same.

Happy Travels!

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography

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Tags:   El Dia del Muertos El Dia de los Muertos Day of the Dead Day of the Dead 2012 Day of the Dead Oaxaca Day of the Dead San Agustin Day of the Dead Etla Mexico Travel Mexico Photography Oaxaca Oaxaca, Mexico ©Sam Antonio Photography Costumes Party Color Banda Band Mexican Culture Traditional Culture Tradition Shutter Drag Dragging the Shutter Street Photography Travel Photography Candid Photography Flash Photography Canon 5D Mark II People Horizontal Celebration Parade Participate Holiday Latin America Waist Up Arts Culture and Entertainment Dead Walking Dead Bizarre Horror Happiness Togetherness Looking At Camera Outdoors Selective Focus Human Body Part Close-up Costume Head And Shoulders North America Cheerful Paint Standing Cheering Religious Celebration Mexico Night Human Skeleton Spooky Incidental People Portrait Photography How to use Flash Motion Movement


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