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The parish church of All Saints was built c.1280 during the reign of Edward I. It is constructed of limestone ashlar and some rubble, and has a chancel with a north vestry, a central tower with transepts, and a nave with a south porch. Work on the church may have begun as early as 1258, when the keeper of Savernake Forest was ordered to provide the vicar of Chalke with timber for the fabric of his church.

The oldest parts of the church are the chancel, the north transept, and part of the west wall, including the doorway, which date from the late 13th century. It is possible that the nave had aisles at this time. The next building phase took place at the end of the 14th century, when the lower stages of the tower, the south transept, and the porch were built.

By 1550 most of the nave had been rebuilt. It is probable that the aisles were removed and the nave widened to the open plan you see today. The north and south walls were strengthened to carry the roof across the nave's width of 34 feet. The upper stages of the tower were built c.1530.

In the mid 17th century extensive repairs were undertaken, partly due to the efforts of John Aubrey. In his 'Natural History of Wiltshire' he says 'in 1659 Sir George Penruddock and I made ourselves churchwardens, or else the fair church had fallen'. The previous wardens had obviously neglected the fabric of the church, and Aubrey took it upon himself to organise repairs.

In 1846-7 the church was restored by Wyatt and Brandon at a cost of £1,720. Included in the work was a new nave roof, as the existing roof was rotten. Medieval wall paintings, one of St. Christopher on the north wall of the nave, and another of the Taking Down from the Cross, over the west tower arch, were removed. Water-colour drawings were made before the originals were destroyed.

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The Church of England parish church of St Andrew, at Great Durnford, was built in the 12th century. Pevsner described it as "a Norman church, remarkably spacious and remarkably rich in furnishings". The north and south doorways are Norman, indicating that the width of the nave has not changed since that time. The chancel and tower are from the 13th century, while the windows are 15th and 16th. Inside are wall paintings, a 12th-century font, a pulpit of 1619, and pews from the 15th or 16th centuries.

The tower has an Angelus bell from the 14th century and four 17th-century bells. The church was designated as Grade I listed in 1958. In 1974 the parish was united with St Michael's at Wilsford and All Saints' at Woodford; today the parish is known as Woodford Valley with Archers Gate.

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All Saints Church is an Anglican parish church in the village of East Meon, Hampshire, England. It is a Grade I listed building[3] and the oldest building in the village. Most of the church dates from the Norman period, with the south chapel and south aisle being added in the 13th century

Tags:   church England religion architecture

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The Church of England parish church of St Andrew, at Great Durnford, was built in the 12th century. Pevsner described it as "a Norman church, remarkably spacious and remarkably rich in furnishings". The north and south doorways are Norman, indicating that the width of the nave has not changed since that time. The chancel and tower are from the 13th century, while the windows are 15th and 16th. Inside are wall paintings, a 12th-century font, a pulpit of 1619, and pews from the 15th or 16th centuries.

The tower has an Angelus bell from the 14th century and four 17th-century bells. The church was designated as Grade I listed in 1958. In 1974 the parish was united with St Michael's at Wilsford and All Saints' at Woodford; today the parish is known as Woodford Valley with Archers Gate.

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The earliest known record of the Church of England parish church of St. Peter ad Vincula dates from 1291.[ Early English style features that survive from this time include the tower arch, a doorway and several windows, including two in the nave. The bell tower was built after a gift of £10 for the purpose in 1412.

The earliest record of the church's dedication to St. Peter ad Vincula ("St Peter in Chains") dates from 1469. It is one of only 15 churches in England with this dedication, which is after the Basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli in Rome.

Late in the 15th and early in the 16th centuries extensive Perpendicular Gothic alterations were made to the church. The tower was rebuilt and the south porch and three-bay north aisle were added and the nave was increased in height.

A west gallery was added in 1714 and later removed, probably during rebuilding work in the 1850s. The works included rebuilding the north aisle, removing the chancel arch and blocking up the east window, causing Pevsner to describe the church as "much renewed". In 1966 the church was designated as Grade II* listed. Today the parish is part of the Chase Benefice, a group of nine on both sides of the Dorset/Wiltshire border.


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