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Pierre Gély-Fort / 970 items

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La Visioconférence : youtu.be/dD84vPK-lOE
"The Dark LOVE BOAT" The Slideshow : pierregelyfort.com/the-dark-love-boat

The voyage that Pierre Gély-Fort invites us on has more in common with a nightmare than a pleasurable experience.

On this bunker-like cruise liner, the passengers resemble convicts trapped in a fake environment, where boredom and satiety are rife.
The travelers greedily give themselves over to selfies, blissfully unaware that the surrounding environment resembles a cardboard stage set, an opulent mirror that serves to reflect social success and material happiness.

The ship is so immense that it completely occults the entire field of vision. We see nothing of the outside landscape, barely glimpsing a piece of sky or sea. Like Patrick McGoohan in The Prisoner, the prison island that is this ocean liner, is all that the occupants have the leisure of strolling, contemplating and consuming.

For these travellers, dreams of any other kind appear not only as forbidden, but also futile. On this ship, where the sheer scale anesthetizes everything off-screen, the passengers seem to renounce their individuality upon embarking, in order to fit into the mould of a privileged class. The only condition is to be happy!

Beyond their apparent innocuousness, Pierre Gély-Fort’s photographs offer an uncompromising look at a world where everything contributes to reducing human beings to the rank of naïve, servile consumers.

At the opposite extreme of a photo-journalistic report, and as if endowed with a scalpel, Pierre painstakingly dissects his very personal vision of an incandescent pallor. Abandoning the colour that characterized his earlier poetic journeys to distant lands, here, he has opted for a radical black and white that is highly contrasted, almost clinical.

The aim here is not to magnify or humanize the story, but instead to demystify this cruise experience, enjoyable for some, undoubtedly, but evocative of fish trapped in a bowl.


Paulo Jorge Lobo
Journalist & Photographer

Tags:   REPORTAGE Piscine HUMAIN Eau PAYSAGE Homme Thème Mer Personne Voyage Street Photography The Dark LOVE BOAT B&W Bâteau Pierre Gély-Fort Art Sombre Port N&B

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"rosanero" the slideshow :

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

"rosanero" the flipbook :

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero-flipbooks


At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;
• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.
It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.
Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

Tags:   rosanero Pierre Gély-Fort Palermo Expressionist Photography Art Sicily Italy REPORTAGE Plage Rue/Route PAYSAGE Street Photography Urbain Ciel Europe Mer

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"rosanero" the slideshow :

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

"rosanero" the flipbook :

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero-flipbooks


At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;
• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.
It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.
Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

Tags:   Femme Plage HUMAIN Art PAYSAGE Groupe Expressionist Photography Ciel Pierre Gély-Fort rosanero Palermo Mer Sicily Italy

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"rosanero" the slideshow :

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

"rosanero" the flipbook :

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero-flipbooks


At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;
• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.
It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.
Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!


At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;
• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.
It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.
Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

Tags:   REPORTAGE Moyens de transport rosanero HUMAIN Expressionist Photography PAYSAGE Palermo Homme Art Urbain Street Photography Pierre Gély-Fort Nuit Activité Rue/Route Sicily Italy

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"rosanero" the slideshow :

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero

"rosanero" the flipbook :

pierregelyfort.com/rosanero-flipbooks


At the very beginning of the last century, the colours of Palermo changed and became “rosanero” (pink and black). This choice of colours, associated with the “bitter and the sweet”, reveal the city’s dual personality.

Trying to penetrate the flesh and soul of Palermo through the art of city portraiture proved to be just as delicate and perilous as the art of human portraiture. As for wanting to separate the bitter from the sweet, that seemed a priori impossible, given that the two facets are so inextricably intertwined.

This is why the photographs presented in this book seek to reflect the dual yet singular universe that emerges from these places, as well as their soul, in two stages:

• when taking the photograph, the focus is on the city, its appearance and reflections;
• during processing, the hue, saturation and luminosity of Palermo’s “rosa” (pinks) are used to illuminate the lowlights of each of the images, highlighting the bittersweet atmosphere of the shadows and the blacks.

The emotional side of Palermo shown here never yields to documentary or photojournalistic illusion.
It revels in a poetic narrative that is by turns raw and sophisticated and deliberately avoids fantasy and Mannerism in order to leave the sometimes brutal confrontation that occurs between the spectator and the city of Palermo as it is today.

Taken in isolation, most of the subjects photographed in Palermo do not seem to encapsulate the tragic or joyous dimension that the images reveal.
Perhaps Palermo is then La Commedia dell’Arte? Or rather, does it embody the Opera dei Pupi (a form of Sicilian puppet theatre that is inscribed on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list), with all its masks, archetypal characters and cult decor, anchored in our collective imagination?

Against the vain will to see an element of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in the theatre-city, Palermo unflinchingly imposes its identity and singularity by confusing spectators and visitors by means of its dual personality, tinged with an essence of the unfinished or the incomplete.

From the darkest to the most dazzling facets, Palermo’s “rosanero” like the tangy taste of English sweets captivates us with delight ... inexorably and without fail!

Tags:   REPORTAGE HUMAIN Art PAYSAGE Homme Street Photography Urbain Expressionist Photography Pierre Gély-Fort Rue/Route rosanero Palermo Sicily Italy


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