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User / Phil's Pixels / Sets / Wyoming
Philip Kuntz / 15 items

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Looking upstream from the Beartooth Lake outlet at the Butte of the same name.

"When you visit Beartooth Lake you will immediately notice the large butte on the opposite (west) shore of the lake. This is Beartooth Butte; a formation that has a completely different geologic origin than the surrounding area. During the Devonian period (420 - 360 million years ago) this entire region was covered by a vast sea. For several million years sediments deposited on that sea bottom compacted tighter and tighter to ultimately become sedimentary rocks. The resulting layer of rock, named the Beartooth Butte Formation, was at least 150 ft thick. Here on the Beartooth Plateau, the layer has been eroded away everywhere except here at Beartooth Butte.

The sedimentary rocks that make up Beartooth Butte are loaded with fossils from the various organisms that died and were buried in the ancient ocean. Geologists and rock hounds visit Beartooth Butte to sample rocks from the formation.

While Beartooth Butte is the namesake of the Beartooth Butte formation, the layer of rock is found in other mountain locations in Montana and Wyoming. Although these locations are hundreds of miles apart, there is no doubt that all of the areas were once part of the same inland sea."
montanahikes.com

Have a wonderful (and safe) Friday and weekend!

Tags:   Beartooth Lake Beartooth Butte Beartooth Pass geology lakes fossils Wyoming

N 160 B 3.4K C 34 E Sep 14, 2019 F Dec 20, 2019
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A typical view seen near the top of Beartooth Pass. The flat plateaus, alpine cirques, U-shaped valleys and lakes of the Beartooths were sculpted by glaciers. Truly a remarkable and fascinating geological wonder.

A trip over the Beartooth Pass is not only a soaring adventure via car, it is a trip back in time to some of the earliest glimpses of Earth history. This is history you can stand on, with some of the oldest rocks on Earth, uplifted to their present height by tectonic forces and Yellowstone’s thermal buoyancy, and finally artistically shaped by persistent weathering and glacial erosion.

Thanks for taking a look. Always appreciated!

Have a wonderful Friday and weekend!


Tags:   geology Beartooth Pass Beartooth Mountains glaciers weather erosion all american road Wyoming Montana

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The view looking south as one climbs Beartooth Pass. The Beartooth Highway climbs to 10,350 feet in Montana and 10,947 in Wyoming—the highest highway elevation in both states. The Absaroka mountain range is in the distance.

"The Beartooth Highway was opened on June 14, 1936. Heralded as one of the most scenic drives in the United States, the Beartooth Highway, a National Scenic Byways All-American Road, features breathtaking views of the Absaroka and Beartooth Mountains, and open high alpine plateaus dotted with countless glacial lakes, forested valleys, waterfalls and wildlife."
dangerousroads.org

Hard to believe December is here already. Another year passing fast. Have a wonderful week.

Tags:   Beartooth Pass Beartooth Highway Absaroka Mountains Beartooth mountains scenic highways National Scenic Byways All-American Road Wyoming

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After leaving Beartooth Pass I headed SE on the Chief Joseph Highway Scenic Byway. Highly recommended if in the area.

Some history if you're interested:

"Dead Indian Pass is associated with the flight of the Nez Perce Indians during the Nez Perce War in 1877.

Pursued by several hundred soldiers led by General O.O. Howard, Chief Joseph led 700 Nez Perce men, women, and children and 2,000 horses through Yellowstone Park eastward and into the Absaroka Mountains. From the Absarokas the Indians looked for a route to the Great Plains. However, the U.S. army had anticipated that the Nez Perce would attempt to break out of the mountains onto the Plains and had stationed General Samuel D. Sturgis and 600 cavalry near the base of the mountains to intercept the Indians. Sturgis's forces were strategically placed where he could move quickly south or north toward known trails along Clarks Fork or the Shoshone River.

Sturgis discounted the Clark's Fork exit from the mountains, "finding that no trail could possibly lead through it." The lower several miles of Clark's Fork passed through a narrow canyon with vertical walls.

On September 8, 1877, the Nez Perce reached Dead Indian Pass, about six miles from Sturgis's force on the Plains below. Their advance scouts observed the soldiers far below awaiting their appearance. If the Indians took the open and easy route to reach the Plains, they would be easily visible. Instead, they attempted a difficult maneuver to mislead the soldiers. They feinted going south toward the Shoshone River by milling their horses in a big circle to kick up visible dust and sell Sturgis on the idea that they were heading south. Then, invisible to army scouts, they sneaked back north, concealed by heavy timber, and traversed Dead Indian Gulch down to the Clark's Fork River. Dead Indian Gulch was a narrow, steep-sided slit in the rock, dropping almost vertically for 1,000 feet and barely wide enough for two horses to go side-by-side. "In a cleanly executed maneuver," said a military historian, "the Nez Perce had countered an extremely serious threat and won a brilliant, though temporary respite.

Sturgis took the bait and led his soldiers away from the Clark's Fork and headed south to the Shoshone. The Nez Perce passed out onto the Great Plains unopposed. Sturgis quickly realized his error and turned around. He met up with Howard on September 11 who had descended the Clark's Fork following the Nez Perce's route, but the two military forces were now two days and 50 miles behind the Nez Perce. The U.S. army would not finally corner and defeat the Nez Perce until nearly a month later at the Battle of Bear Paw." Wikipedia.

Friday's here! Have a fabulous Friday and weekend!

Tags:   Dead Indian Pass Chief Joseph Scenic Byway Wyoming Highway 296 viewpoint Nez Perce Indians Nez Perce War Absaroka Mountains Wyoming

N 289 B 5.2K C 77 E Sep 14, 2019 F Oct 9, 2019
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A lenticular cloud in the process of breaking up cruises over one of the many lakes on Beartooth Pass. Was fascinated by the unique shape.

Thanks for taking a look!

Have a wonderful Wednesday!

Tags:   lenticular clouds lenticular clouds cloudscape skies Beartooth Pass lakes Wyoming


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