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User / Phil's Pixels / Sets / Idaho
Philip Kuntz / 240 items

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Sunset skies above Idaho's Lochsa River.

This remote river is fed by the melting snowpack of the Bitterroot Range, among the highest precipitation areas in the state. The Selway river joins it before they flow into the Clearwater River. Traveling thru here was one of the hardest, grueling stretches of the Lewis & Clark expedition.

"Long before the arrival of European Americans in the 19th century, the Nez Perce people in Idaho used the trail along the Lochsa River to travel to the plains of Montana to hunt buffalo. Kootenai and Salish (Flatheads) from Montana used the river trail to reach salmon runs in the rivers and streams feeding into the Columbia basin." Wikipedia

"The Lochsa is one of the greatest whitewater flows in the country – and the world. Pronounced “lock-saw” which means rough water in the Nez Perce Language. 37 Class III, 25 Class IV, and two Class V rapids will get your arms burning and your heart pumping. The names of the rapids say it all – Grim Reaper, Pipeline, Lochsa Falls, Termination – and you won’t get much rest between."
trailadventures.com

I sincerely appreciate your friendships, comments and support. Thank you!

Tags:   Lochsa River rivers Bitterroot Mountains Lolo Pass sunset clouds whitewater rafting rafting Wilderness Gateway Campground Idaho

N 214 B 3.4K C 49 E Sep 13, 2018 F Apr 15, 2020
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One of the many peaks of the Soldier mountain range in central Idaho. I couldn't identify this particular mountain but did like it.
Love me some mountains....

Your visits are always appreciated!

May your Wednesday be safe, and wonderful!

Tags:   Autumn fall Soldier Mountain Range Fairfield Idaho mountains Idaho Highway 20

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A spring thunderstorm dumps some rain on the Idaho side of the Hell's Canyon seen from the Oregon side. Nice and green this time of year but will soon be dry and brown. Some say the Hell's Canyon was so named due to the high heat that builds up in the basalt and sedimentary cliffs down along the Snake River that does not cool off much at night during the hot summer months. Having experienced that heat I understand. However the most common and established thought for the name is that passage with any watercraft thru the canyon on the Snake River was deadly and nearly impossible. The name stuck but to me the area isn't hellacious but imposing and majestic.

Thanks for taking a look, always appreciated.

Enjoy a safe and wonderful Easter holiday weekend.

Tags:   Spring rain thunderstorm windy greens Hells Canyon chasm gorge deepest canyon in north america Easter Idaho Oregon Snake River

N 166 B 3.2K C 38 E May 21, 2019 F Mar 18, 2020
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Titles, titles, titles......

A view of the Snake River flowing north as it approaches the last dam (Hells Canyon Dam) in Idaho.

Hells Canyon is 10 miles wide as it’s widest point. And on average about 5,500 feet deep.

The Snake River originates in Yellowstone National Park at 9,500 feet and winds through southern Idaho before turning north to form the boundary between Idaho and Oregon. It finally joins the Columbia River near Pasco, Washington at 340 feet in elevation 1036 miles from its source. The Snake drains 109,000 square miles and contributes 36 million acre feet of water to the Columbia River, ranking 6th in volume among the nation's rivers." fs.usda.gov

Challenging times....please stay safe and healthy!

Tags:   Snake River Hell's Canyon gorge chasm canyon river Oregon Idaho border Black Point Bluff

N 74 B 3.2K C 19 E Sep 20, 2019 F Dec 5, 2019
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These two volcanic cones fascinated me on this rainy day. Much to intrigue and captivate anyone with a historical or geological interest at The Craters of the Moon, which lies halfway between Boise Idaho and Yellowstone Park. A couple other images from here in comments.

"The Monument and Preserve encompass three major lava fields and about 400 square miles (1,000 km2) of sagebrush steppe grasslands to cover a total area of 1,117 square miles (2,893 km2). The Monument alone covers 53,571 acres (21,679 ha). All three lava fields lie along the Great Rift of Idaho, with some of the best examples of open rift cracks in the world, including the deepest known on Earth at 800 feet (240 m). There are excellent examples of almost every variety of basaltic lava.

Like Yellowstone's Old Faithful, the spatter cone chain at Craters of the Moon best symbolizes the essence of this special place. Created during a dwindling stage of an eruption, the spatter cones formed as hot lumps of lava were thrown a short distance into the air only to fall back to earth around a small central vent. As the still molten blobs landed on top of each other, they cooled and adhered to nearby pieces to form the walls of what could be considered a mini-volcano." Wikipedia

Thanks for taking a look and for any comments, faves and suggestions.

Tags:   Craters of the Moon Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve basaltic lava spatter cones unique geology stormy Idaho


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