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Frank . . . the photographer / 6,543 items

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...from a walk on the Nudgee Beach mangrove boardwalk.

Mangrove Gerygone
Scientific Name: Gerygone levigaster
Description: Similar in size and shape to Dusky Gerygone, but slightly shorter bill. Top and sides of head and neck grey/brown, changing to grey/white on on chin and throat. Narrow white eye-ring. Iris red/red brown, legs and feet black, black bill. Often with redish brown tinge on rump. Off white on upperbody, with pale grey on throat, chin and sides.
Similar species: Dusky Gerygone, Large-billed Gerygone
Distribution: Purely coastal along Northern and Eastern coast, living in the mangroves. From Central Coast of NSW to the Kimberley WA. Sometime found in adjacent paperbark forests.
Habitat: Mangroves as well as associated paperbark forests and thickets nearby mangroves.
Seasonal movements: No known seasonal movements, sedentary or resident.
Feeding: Usually forage in mangroves in trees, sometimes on ground. Can forage either singly, in pairs, small flocks sometimes with White-eyes. Exclusively insects. Occasionally hovers over flowers to catch insects.
Breeding: Eastern Australia mostly spring-summer, in North mostly Autumn-spring (dry season). Usually nests in mangroves, nest is oval, domes with spout like entrance. Constructio materials include grass, paperbark, roots, mos, dry seaweed, and decorated with cocoons, spider egg-sacs. Usually 2-3 eggs. Incubated by female, 12-14 days.. Both parents feed nestlings.
Minimum Size: 10cm
Maximum Size: 12cm
Average size: 11cm
Average weight: 6g
Breeding season: Spring-Summer
Clutch Size: 2-3
Incubation: 12 days-14 days
Nestling Period: 14 days-17 days
(Source: www.birdsinbackyards.net)

© Chris Burns 2020
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This image may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying and recording without my written consent.

Tags:   Mangrove Gerygone Gerygone levigaster gerygone bird Australian birds fauna Australian fauna nature small bird Nikon D500 Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6E ED VR Wynnum Mangrove Boardwalk Brisbane Queensland Australia wildlife Australian wildlife

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Collard (now called Torresian) Kingfisher
Scientific name: Todiramphus chloris
The Collared Kingfisher is a medium-sized kingfisher (body length of 23-27 cm) with a large, black kookaburra-like bill. These Kingfishers are dull olive-green above and white on the underbody, with a dark brownish-olive cap, white spot on the lores (between the bill and the eye) and a broad white collar on the neck that extends to join the white underbody. The uppertail and lower edge of the folded wings are blue. The Collared Kingfisher is easily confused with the much more common and widespread Sacred Kingfisher Todiramphus sanctus. The two species have a very similar shape but the Collared Kingfisher is considerably larger and stockier, with a much longer and heavier bill. In the Collared Kingfisher the loral spot, underbody and collar are white, whereas they are buff in the Sacred, and the Sacred also has more blue on the folded wing. The Forest Kingfisher Todiramphus macleayii also occurs in the same region as the Collared but is much smaller, with a finer bill, and has strongly blue upperparts and white wing-patches (usually only obvious in flight). Birds are usually seen singly or in pairs. Its flight is swift and direct, and usually low over water or vegetation. The main call is a loud, strident, deliberate two or three note call, simialr to that of the Sacred Kingfisher.
Distribution: In Australia, the Collared Kingfisher extends around the northern coasts, from Shark Bay in northern Western Australia to the estuary of the Tweed River in far north-eastern NSW, with rare scattered records south of there, mainly south to the Clarence River. In NSW, the species is observed regularly only at Ukerebagh and nearby Cobaki Broadwater, and it breeds along the Tweed River estuary. Beyond Australia, the species is widely distributed from the Red Sea and Arabian Gulf in the Middle East, through southern and south-eastern Asia to Indonesia and New Guinea and east to the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Fiji, Tonga and Samoa.
Habitat and ecology: Collared Kingfishers are virtually restricted to mangrove associations of estuaries, inlets, sheltered bays and islands, and the tidal flats and littoral zone bordering mangroves. They sometimes occur in terrestrial forests or woodlands bordering mangroves, where they will nest in holes in trees or in arboreal termitaria. They are sometimes seen in streets or gardens in built-up areas bordering mangrove vegetation. Nests are usually in holes in trunks of large, live or dead mangrove trees, though they sometimes nest in hollows or in arboreal termite nests in large eucalypts or paperbarks adjacent to mangroves or estuarine foraging habitats. They are often seen perched on rock walls, jetties, piles or on the ground on tidal flats. They also sometimes occur in parks and gardens along foreshores. Mostly take food from the ground, from the surface of mud and sand, mainly along seaward fringe of mangroves. Sometimes take food from shallow water or from air. The diet consists mostly of crustaceans, especially crabs, but they also take insects, small fish, and lizards. They have also been reported to occasionally take young birds.
Breeding is usually in spring and summer, with clutches observed in NSW in September to December, and young birds from October to January. Birds usually lay three eggs, but clutches of two to four recorded. Young leave the nest about 1 month after hatching.
(Source: NSW Government, Office of Environment and Heritage)
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© Chris Burns 2020

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This image may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying and recording without my written consent.

Tags:   Collard Kingfisher Todiramphus chloris Mangrove Kingfisher birds Australian birds fauna Australian fauna mangroves mangrove habitat Nikon D500 Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6E ED VR nature outdoors Wynnum Mangrove Boardwalk

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Rainbow Bee-eater
Scientific Name: Merops ornatus
The Rainbow Bee-Eater is a spectacular bird. With its green, blue, chestnut and yellow plumage, its slim build, slender curved bill and distinctive streamers that extend from the end of its tail, it is simply beautiful. Bee-Eaters are a familiar sight in many lightly-timbered parts of mainland Australia, where they often perch on fence-posts or overhead wires, then launch after flying insects, flying swiftly, sometimes with rapid twists and turns, before snapping the insect in its bill, and returning to the perch to eat it. Research featured in the 'State of Australia's Birds 2015' headline and regional reports shows a marked decline for the Rainbow Bee-eater (and some other aerial insectivories) in the East Coast region, where reporting rates for this species have dropped by over 50% in the since 2001.
Description: A striking, colourful bird, the Rainbow Bee-eater is medium sized, with a long slim curved bill and a long tail with distinctive tail-streamers. It has a golden crown and a red eye set in a wide black stripe from the base of the bill to the ears, which is edged with a thin blue line. The throat is orange-yellow, with a broad black band separating it from a green breast. The upperparts are green, with the flight feathers coppery and black tipped. The underwings are bright orange, with a black edge. The lower abdomen is blue. The tail is black, including the long tail streamers, with a blue tinge. Females have shorter, thicker tail streamers than males, but are otherwise similar. Young birds are duller and greener, lacking the black band on the chest and the long tail streamers.
Similar Species: The Rainbow Bee-eater may resemble some kingfishers, however these are plumper, with strong straight beaks, and never catch prey in flight.
Distribution: The Rainbow Bee-eater is found throughout mainland Australia, as well as eastern Indonesia, New Guinea and, rarely, the Solomon Islands. In Australia it is widespread, except in desert areas, and breeds throughout most of its range, although southern birds move north to winter over.
Habitat: The Rainbow Bee-eater is most often found in open forests, woodlands and shrublands, and cleared areas, usually near water. It will be found on farmland with remnant vegetation and in orchards and vineyards. It will use disturbed sites such as quarries, cuttings and mines to build its nesting tunnels.
Feeding: Rainbow Bee-eaters eat insects, mainly catching bees and wasps, as well as dragonflies, beetles, butterflies and moths. They catch flying insects on the wing and carry them back to a perch to beat them against it before swallowing them. Bees and wasps are rubbed against the perch to remove the stings and venom glands.
Breeding: Rainbow Bee-eaters gather in small flocks before returning to summer breeding areas after over-wintering in the north (apart from the resident northern populations). Both males and females select a suitable nesting site in a sandy bank and dig a long tunnel (average length: 89.4 cm) leading to a nesting chamber, which is often lined with grasses. Both parents incubate the eggs and both feed the young, sometimes with the assistance of auxiliaries (helpers).
(Source: www.birdlife.org.au)


© Chris Burns 2020
__________________________________________

All rights reserved.
This image may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying and recording without my written consent.

Tags:   Rainbow Bee-eater Merops ornatus bee-eater bird Australian bird fauna Australian fauna Lagoon Creek Barcaldine Queensland Australia Nikon D500 Nikon 200.0-500.0 mm f/5.6 VR nature Australian nature outdoors

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White-bellied Sea-Eagle
Scientific Name: Haliaeetus leucogaster
Description: The White-bellied Sea-Eagle has white on the head, rump and underparts and dark grey on the back and wings. In flight the black flight feathers on the wings are easily seen when the bird is viewed from below. The large, hooked bill is grey with a darker tip, and the eye is dark brown. The legs and feet are cream-white, with long black talons (claws). The sexes are similar. As in other raptors (birds of prey), Males (2.5 kg - 3.7 kg) are slightly smaller than females (2.8 kg - 4.2 kg).The wingspan is about 1.8 m - 2 m. Young Sea-Eagles are brown as juveniles than slowly become to resemble adults in a patchwork manner, acquiring the complete adult plumage by their fourth year.
Similar species: The White-bellied Sea-Eagle is the second largest raptor (bird of prey) found in Australia. The largest is the Wedge-tailed Eagle, Aquila audax, which stands up to 1 m tall. The Wedge-tailed Eagle is mostly brown, with a wedge-shaped tail. Young Sea-Eagles may be confused with the Wedge-tailed Eagle, but differ in having a paler head and tail and more steeply upswept wings when soaring.
Distribution: White-bellied Sea-Eagles are a common sight in coastal and near coastal areas of Australia. In addition to Australia, the species is found in New Guinea, Indonesia, China, south-east Asia and India
Habitat: White-bellied Sea-Eagles are normally seen perched high in a tree, or soaring over waterways and adjacent land. Birds form permanent pairs that inhabit territories throughout the year.
Feeding: The White-bellied Sea-Eagle feeds mainly off aquatic animals, such as fish, turtles and sea snakes, but it takes birds and mammals as well. It is a skilled hunter, and will attack prey up to the size of a swan. Sea-Eagles also feed on carrion (dead prey) such as sheep and fish along the waterline. They harass smaller birds, forcing them to drop any food that they are carrying. Sea-Eagles feed alone, in pairs or in family groups.
Breeding: White-bellied Sea-Eagles build a large stick nest, which is used for many seasons in succession. The nest can be located in a tree up to 30m above the ground, but may also be placed on the ground or on rocks, where there are no suitable trees. At the start of the breeding season, the nest is lined with fresh green leaves and twigs. The female carries out most of the incubation of the white eggs, but the male performs this duty from time to time.
Calls: Distinctive loud "goose-like" honking call, which is heard particularly during the breeding season.
Minimum Size: 75cm
Maximum Size: 85cm
Average size: 80cm
Average weight: 2 630g
Breeding season: May to October
Clutch Size: Two.
(Source: www.birdsinbackyards.net/species/Haliaeetus-leucogaster)

© Chris Burns 2020
__________________________________________

All rights reserved.

This image may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying and recording without my written consent.

Tags:   White-bellied Sea-Eagle Haliaeetus leucogaster eagle sea eagle raptor bird Australian birds fauna Australian fauna wildlife Australian wildlife outdoors nature Nikon D500 Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6E ED VRS Buckley's Hole Bribie Island Queensland Australia

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Eastern Osprey
Scientific Name: Pandion cristatus
The aerial displays of the Eastern Osprey often feature two birds soaring together in a series of undulations, or one following the other on a weaving course. These may occur near the nest, which is a huge structure made of sticks, driftwood and seaweed. As the nest is used year after year, the material may accumulate to form an enormous pile of sticks, sometimes 2 metres across and 2 metres tall, with the size and shape determined by the nest-site and how long it has been used.
Description: The Osprey is a medium-sized fish-eating raptor (bird of prey). It has dark brown upperparts contrasting with pale underparts. There is a black band through the eye, separating the white throat from the pale crown. The Osprey has a rather small head and neck and typically swivels its head around or sways its head from side to side. When it is perched, there is a short bristly crest. The eyes are placed well forward on the head. The fingered wings in flight are narrow and angled distinctively. There are dark carpal patches on the underwing (at the bend in the wing). The beak is strongly hooked and the legs are powerful. The female is similar to the male but is larger and has a fuller, darker breast band. The Osprey is also called the Fish Hawk or White-headed Osprey.
Similar Species: The White-bellied Sea-Eagle, Haliaeetus leucogaster, is much larger and soars with up-swept wings, rather than the sharply bowed wings of the Osprey.
Distribution: The Osprey is cosmopolitan, being found in many coastal and lake areas of the world. In Australia, it is found on the north and east coast from Broome to the south coast of New South Wales. There is also a southern population from Kangaroo Island to the Great Australian Bight and a western population from Esperance to Cape Keraudren. Ospreys are also found in the Phillipines, Indonesia and New Guinea.
Habitat: Ospreys are found on the coast and in terrestrial wetlands of tropical and temperate Australia and off-shore islands, occasionally ranging inland along rivers, though mainly in the north of the country.
Feeding: The Osprey feeds mainly on medium-sized live fish, which it does not swallow whole, but rips apart to eat. The Osprey patrols the coast, searching for prey. It folds its wings, then drops headlong, with its feet forward to snatch a fish with its talons. It may go right under the water or snatch a fish from the surface, before lifting off again, with strong wing strokes.
Breeding: The Osprey may use the same nest year after year. The nest is made from sticks and driftwood and may be huge after many years. It is usually placed on a cliff, a dead tree or even a radio mast. Both birds bring sticks, but the female usually places the sticks in the nest. The nest is lined with grass, seaweed or bark. The female does most of the incubation, while the male brings food to the nest.
(Source: birdlife.org.au/bird-profile/eastern-osprey)

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© Chris Burns 2020

All rights reserved.

This image may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished, downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying and recording without my written consent.

Tags:   Eastern Osprey Pandion cristatus bird Australian bird fauna Australian fauna wildlife Australian wildlife raptor osprey Nikon D500 Nikon 200.0-500.0 mm f/5.6 VR Hervey Bay Queensland Australia Lagoon Creek, Barcaldine QLD


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