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User / northernblue109 / Sets / Railways in Britain: Industrial, Military & Heritage
68 items

N 6 B 5.0K C 0 E Jul 28, 2011 F Jul 27, 2011
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The British Steel Corporation purchased 24 examples (almost half of the total build) of British Rail's barely run-in (but redundant) Class 14 diesel-hydraulic fleet, including one acquired via BP-Shell. Initially dispersed across various sites, all ultimately migrated to BSC's vast ironstone quarry complex at Corby in Northamptonshire.

Unlike the National Coal Board, BSC didn't consider it necessary to repaint its Class 14s, which retained their original duo-tone green livery (minus BR logo and with the addition of a large BSC number) throughout their working lives. The only significant external modifications appear to have been the addition of twin headlights at each end and orange warning beacons on the cab roof.

This digital representation shows BSC No 52 as it would have appeared when freshly prepared for service. This is believed to be the former D9537 although records do differ (clarification would be welcome). In any event, the image is based on D9537 as preserved at the Gloucester & Warwickshire Railway in the mid-1980s, but digitally backdated with BSC running number and warning beacons. Eight former BSC Class 14s survive in preservation. For additional background information and a complete list of survivors, please visit www.railblue.com (28-Oct-08).

STRICTLY COPYRIGHT: You may download a copy of any image for your personal use, but it would be an offence to remove the copyright information or to post it elsewhere without the express permission of the copyright owner.

Tags:   Class 14 British Steel Corporation diesel locomotive industrial railway

N 8 B 3.9K C 2 E Aug 21, 2012 F Aug 21, 2012
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I produced a first cut of this image some time ago but, for whatever reason, didn't pursue the idea. Having recently applied the same livery to a Class 56 (link below), I thought it worth giving the Class 14 another go. As is well known, the British Steel Corporation was a major user of former BR Class 14 diesels but they retain BR livery to the end. Had repaints occurred, they would have most likely received overall yellow with black warning markings (21-Aug-12).

See also Class 56 diesel in British Steel livery:
www.flickr.com/photos/northernblue109/7355787674/in/set-7...

STRICTLY COPYRIGHT: You may download a copy of any image for your personal use, but it would be an offence to remove the copyright information or to post it elsewhere without the express permission of the copyright owner

Tags:   Class 14 British Steel diesel locomotive industrial railway

N 4 B 4.3K C 2 E Aug 21, 2011 F Aug 21, 2011
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The Derwent Valley Light Railway was a pioneer of the light railcar concept. In 1924 it acquired a pair of 18-seat rail cars built on Ford one ton truck chassis fitted with flanged wheels. They could operate back-to-back as a double-ended unit, or individually using turntables at either end of the line. Even such frugal methods of operation were unsuccessful in sustaining the line’s passenger service and the pair were sold to the County Donegal Joint Railway Committee in the west of Ireland for conversion to three foot gauge.

This fictional image supposes that the Ford railcars were retained by the DVLR and ultimately replaced by a single, larger unit. It is based on a photograph from bodybuilder Charles H Roe of Leeds. The 20-seat body was fitted to a four-wheel chassis built by Hudswell Clarke & Co and fitted with a Dorman four-cylinder (petrol?) engine. It was delivered in 1933 to the Spurn Point railway in East Yorkshire, operated by (what was then) the War Department. Presumably it had a driving cab and passenger door on opposite corners at either end. The half-cab arrangement is unusual on a rail vehicle, the opposite end having a conventional flat face. DVLR livery details are unclear, the impression from the Ford railcars being of a single dark colour, possibly maroon or brown (22-Aug-11).

www.flickr.com/photos/northernblue109/6046035749/in/set-7...

Tags:   railbus DVLR Derwent Valley Light Railway Charles H Roe Hudswell Clarke heritage railway

N 11 B 5.4K C 0 E Apr 10, 2011 F Apr 10, 2011
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The Derwent Valley Railway (formerly Derwent Valley Light Railway) was the last independent 'common carrier' railway in the country. From an operating base at Layerthorpe on the western edge of York, it meandered southwards for sixteen miles through predominantly agricultural land, which nonetheless generated significant coal, fuel oil, cement and bulk grain traffic. Passenger traffic ceased in 1926, other than a brief flourish of tourist services in the late seventies. Progressively cut back in length, it closed entirely in 1981.

After hiring locomotives from British Rail and its predecessors for most of its existence, it acquired three BR Class 04 diesels in 1969 - D2245 and D2298 for use, and D2329 for spares. British Railways 11215 was delivered new to Neville Hill, Leeds depot in 1956 and ended its BR days as D2245 working at Goole docks. It was sold to the Derwent Valley Light Railway in May 1969. This digital representation depicts the grey and black livery with red lettering carried throughout its time as DVR No 2. On withdrawal in May 1978, it was acquired for preservation by the Battlefield Railway at Shackerstone, where it has been restored to original BR black livery (01-Aug-10).

All rights reserved. Follow the link below for terms and conditions, additional information about my work; and to request work from me:

www.flickr.com/photos/northernblue109/6046035749/in/set-7...

Tags:   Class 04 Derwent Valley Railway DVR diesel locomotive industrial railway

N 6 B 3.8K C 2 E Apr 10, 2011 F Apr 10, 2011
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This fictional image is loosely based on Derwent Valley Railway No 1 (the former BR D2298) as repainted for a time in preservation. As far as I can determine, it carried the same grey livery as No 2 whilst in service with the DVLR. The North Eastern Railway apple green livery would have been appropriate and looked good alongside the preserved J72 'Joem', which spend some time on the DVLR [see Eborman's comments below].

The real No 1 was new in 1960 and withdrawn by BR from Gateshead depot in December 1968, having spent just eight years in service - an ideal purchase by the DVLR, which was all too aware of the rapid demise of the 204hp locomotives that it had previously hired from British Rail. It worked regularly until sold for preservation in 1982. After a brief period in BR blue, it was repainted into BR green at the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre (01-Aug-10).

All rights reserved. Follow the link below for terms and conditions, additional information about my work; and to request work from me:

www.flickr.com/photos/northernblue109/6046035749/in/set-7...

Tags:   Derwent Valley Light Railway DVLR Class 04 diesel locomotive heritage railway


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