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N 84 B 1.4K C 2 E Sep 24, 2021 F Sep 24, 2021
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Scientists tap into an array of imagers aboard the six-wheeled explorer to get a big picture of the Red Planet.

NASA’s Perseverance rover has been exploring Jezero Crater for more than 217 Earth days (211 Martian days, or sols), and the dusty rocks there are beginning to tell their story – about a volatile young Mars flowing with lava and water.

That story, stretching billions of years into the past, is unfolding thanks in large part to the seven powerful science cameras aboard Perseverance. Able to home in on small features from great distances, take in vast sweeps of Martian landscape, and magnify tiny rock granules, these specialized cameras also help the rover team determine which rock samples offer the best chance to learn whether microscopic life ever existed on the Red Planet.

Altogether, some 800 scientists and engineers around the world make up the larger Perseverance team. That includes smaller teams, from a few dozen to as many as 100, for each of the rover’s cameras and instruments. And the teams behind the cameras must coordinate each decision about what to image.

Here, using its WATSON camera, NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover took this selfie over a rock nicknamed “Rochette,” on Sept.10, 2021, the 198th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. Two holes can be seen where the rover used its robotic arm to drill rock core samples.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

#NASA #MarshallSpaceFlightCenter #MSFC #rocket space #KSC #KennedySpaceCenter #Perserverance #Mars2020Rover #Mars #planet

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Tags:   NASA Marshall Space Flight Center MSFC rocket space Artemis Space Launch System Moon2Mars Kennedy Space Center Perserverance Mars 2020 Rover Mars

N 61 B 2.3K C 0 E Sep 20, 2021 F Sep 21, 2021
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This is a 2000 X-ray image of the elliptical galaxy NGC 0533 by the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

Image credit: NASA/CXC/U. Ohio/T.Statler & S.Diehl

#NASA #MarshallSpaceFlightCenter #MSFC #Marshall #ChandraXrayObservatory #cxo #galaxy #ellipticalgalaxy

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Tags:   NASA NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center MSFC Chandra X-Ray Observatory CXO Solar System Beyond astronomy galaxy elliptical galaxy

N 108 B 3.2K C 1 E Sep 19, 2021 F Sep 19, 2021
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Images of knobbly rocks and rounded hills are delighting scientists as NASA’s Curiosity rover climbs Mount Sharp, a 5-mile-tall (8-kilometer-tall) mountain within the 96-mile-wide (154-kilometer-wide) basin of Mars’ Gale Crater. The rover’s Mast Camera, or Mastcam, highlights those features in a panorama captured on July 3, 2021 (the 3,167th Martian day, or sol, of the mission).

This location is particularly exciting: Spacecraft orbiting Mars show that Curiosity is now somewhere between a region enriched with clay minerals and one dominated by salty minerals called sulfates. The mountain’s layers in this area may reveal how the ancient environment within Gale Crater dried up over time. Similar changes are seen across the planet, and studying this region up close has been a major long-term goal for the mission.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

#NASA #jpl #jetpropulsionlaboratory #marshallspaceflightcenter #msfc #mars #moontomars #planet #space #curiosity #MarsScienceLaboratory #MarsCuriosityRover #curiosityrover

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N 71 B 2.9K C 0 E Sep 17, 2021 F Sep 18, 2021
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This composite X-ray (blue)/radio (pink) image of the galaxy cluster Abell 400 shows radio jets immersed in a vast cloud of multimillion degree X-ray emitting gas that pervades the cluster. The jets emanate from the vicinity of two supermassive black holes (bright spots in the image). These black holes are in the dumbbell galaxy NGC 1128 (see optical image), which has produced the giant radio source, 3C 75.

The peculiar dumbbell structure of this galaxy is thought to be due to two large galaxies that are in the process of merging. Such mergers are common in the relatively congested environment of galaxy clusters. An alternative hypothesis is that the apparent structure is the result of a coincidence in time when the two galaxies are passing one another, like ships in the cosmic sea.

Careful analysis of the recent Chandra and radio data on 3C 75 indicates that the galaxies and their supermassive black holes are indeed bound together by their mutual gravity. By using the shape and direction of the radio jets, astronomers were able to determine the direction of the motion of the black holes. The swept-back appearance of the radio jets is produced by the rapid motion of the galaxy through the hot gas of the cluster, in much the same way that a motorcyclist's scarf is swept back while speeding down the road.

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/AIfA/D.Hudson & T.Reiprich et al.; Radio: NRAO/VLA/NRL

#NASA #MarshallSpaceFlightCenter #MSFC #Marshall #ChandraXrayObservatory #cxo #galaxy #blackhole #supermassiveblackhole

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Tags:   NASA NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center MSFC Chandra X-Ray Observatory CXO Solar System Beyond astronomy black hole galaxy supermassive black hole 3C 75 in Abell 400

N 65 B 3.2K C 1 E Sep 15, 2021 F Sep 16, 2021
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Clouds of hot, X-ray producing gas detected by Chandra around the quasars 4C37.43, shown in this 2006 image, and 3C249.1, provide strong evidence for galactic superwinds, where a quasar in the center of a galaxy has turned on and is expelling gas at high speeds. The X-ray features seen at five, six, ten and eleven o'clock (labeled c, a, d, b, respectively) in the 4C37.43 image are located tens of thousands of light years from the central supermassive black hole that powers the quasar. They are likely due to shock waves in the superwind.

Image credit: NASA/CXC/Univ. of Hawaii/A.Stockton et al.

#NASA #MarshallSpaceFlightCenter #MSFC #Marshall #ChandraXrayObservatory #cxo #quasar #superwinds

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Tags:   NASA NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center MSFC Chandra X-Ray Observatory CXO Solar System Beyond astronomy black hole supermassive black hole 4C37.43


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