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N 44 B 968 C 1 E Sep 25, 2020 F Sep 25, 2020
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Cyclones at the north pole of Jupiter appear as swirls of striking colors in this extreme false color rendering of an image from NASA’s Juno mission. The huge, persistent cyclone found at Jupiter’s north pole is visible at the center of the image, encircled by smaller cyclones that range in size from 2,500 to 2,900 miles (4,000 to 4,600 kilometers). Together, this pattern of storms covers an area that would dwarf the Earth.

The color choices in this image reveal both the beauty of Jupiter and the subtle details present in Jupiter’s dynamic cloud structure. Each new observation that Juno provides of Jupiter’s atmosphere complements computer simulations and helps further refine our understanding of how the storms evolve over time.

The Juno mission provided the first clear views of Jupiter’s polar regions. Juno’s Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) instrument has also mapped this area, as well as a similar pattern of storms at the planet’s south pole.

Citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt made this composite image using data obtained by the JunoCam instrument during four of the Juno spacecraft’s close passes by Jupiter, which took place between Feb. 17, 2020, and July 25, 2020. The greatly exaggerated color is partially a result of combining many individual images to create this view.

Image Credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS; Image processing by Gerald Eichstädt

#NASA #MarshallSpaceFlightCenter #MSFC #Marshall #jpl #jetpropulsionlaboratory #nasamarshall #MSFC #solarsystem #juno #jupiter #space #astronomy #nasajuno #nasamarshallspaceflightcenter

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More about Juno

NASA Media Usage Guidelines

Tags:   NASA Marshall Space Flight Center MSFC Jet Propulsion Laboratory JPL Solar system and beyond Juno Jupiter Space planets

N 54 B 1.9K C 0 E Sep 21, 2013 F Sep 24, 2020
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This week in 2013, the High-Energy Replicated Optics for Exploring the Sun mission launched aboard the Columbia Scientific Balloon from Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The mission was a collaborative effort between NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. HEROES was designed to investigate the scale of high-energy processes in a pulsar wind nebula by mapping the angular vortex of hard X-ray emission; the acceleration and transport of energetic electrons in solar flares using hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy; the hard X-ray properties of astrophysical targets such as X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei; and electron acceleration in the non-flaring solar corona by searching for the hard X-ray signature of energetic electrons. Here, the HEROES payload awaits launch as the helium balloon inflates in the background. The NASA History Program is responsible for generating, disseminating, and preserving NASA’s remarkable history and providing a comprehensive understanding of the institutional, cultural, social, political, economic, technological, and scientific aspects of NASA’s activities in aeronautics and space. For more pictures like this one and to connect to NASA’s history, visit the Marshall History Program’s webpage.

Image credit: NASA

#tbt #nasa #marshallspaceflightcenter #msfc #marshall #space #history #marshallhistory #nasamarshall #nasahistory #nasamarshallspaceflightcenter #HEROES #Goddard #GoddardSpaceFlightCenter #GSFC #ColumbiaScientificBaloon

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Marshall History

For more NASA History photos

NASA Media Usage Guidelines

Tags:   NASA Marshall Space Flight Center MSFC space history HEROES X-ray Sun Columbia Scientific Baloon heliophysics HELIUM BALLOON FORT SUMNER

N 70 B 2.4K C 0 E Sep 23, 2020 F Sep 23, 2020
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A new project using sonification turns astronomical images from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory and other telescopes into sound. This allows users to "listen" to the center of the Milky Way as observed in X-ray, optical, and infrared light. As the cursor moves across the image, sounds represent the position and brightness of the sources.

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: NASA/STScI; IR: Spitzer NASA/JPL-Caltech

#NASA #MarshallSpaceFlightCenter #MSFC #Marshall #chandraxrayobservatory #ChandraXRay #cxo #chandra #astronomy #space #astrophysics #nasamarshallspaceflightcenter #solarsystemandbeyond #nebula #supernova #galacticcenter #galaxy

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More about the Chandra X-ray Observatory

NASA Media Usage Guidelines

Tags:   NASA NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center NASA Marshall Marshall MSFC Chandra X-Ray Observatory CXO Solar System & Beyond astronomy astrophysics X-ray nebula supernova galactic center galaxy

N 170 B 2.8K C 0 E Sep 22, 2020 F Sep 22, 2020
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Jupiter's volcanically active moon Io casts its shadow on the planet in this dramatic image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. As with solar eclipses on the Earth, within the dark circle racing across Jupiter's cloud tops one would witness a full solar eclipse as Io passes in front of the Sun.

Such events occur frequently on Jupiter because it is a large planet with many moons. In addition, unlike most other planets in our solar system, Jupiter's axis is not highly tilted relative to its orbit, so the Sun never strays far from Jupiter's equatorial plane (+/- 3 degrees). This means Jupiter's moons regularly cast their shadows on the planet throughout its year.

Juno's close proximity to Jupiter provides an exceptional fish-eye view, showing a small fraction near the planet's equator. The shadow is about 2,200 miles (3,600 kilometers) wide, approximately the same width as Io, but appears much larger relative to Jupiter.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill (CC-BY)

#NASA #MarshallSpaceFlightCenter #MSFC #Marshall #jpl #jetpropulsionlaboratory #nasamarshall #MSFC #solarsystem #juno #jupiter #space #astronomy #nasajuno #nasamarshallspaceflightcenter

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More about Juno

NASA Media Usage Guidelines

Tags:   NASA Marshall Space Flight Center MSFC Jet Propulsion Laboratory JPL Solar system and beyond Juno Jupiter Space planets

N 127 B 2.8K C 0 E Aug 10, 2020 F Sep 21, 2020
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The twisting patterns created by the multiple spiral arms of NGC 2835 create the illusion of an eye. This is a fitting description, as this magnificent galaxy resides near the head of the southern constellation of Hydra, the water snake. This stunning barred spiral galaxy, with a width of just over half that of the Milky Way, is brilliantly featured in this image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Although it cannot be seen in this image, a supermassive black hole with a mass millions of times that of our Sun is known to nestle in the very center of NGC 2835.

This galaxy was imaged as part of PHANGS-HST, a large galaxy survey with Hubble that aims to study the connections between cold gas and young stars in a variety of galaxies in the local universe. Within NGC 2835, this cold, dense gas produces large numbers of young stars within large star formation regions. The bright blue areas, commonly observed in the outer spiral arms of many galaxies, show where near-ultraviolet light is being emitted more strongly, indicating recent or ongoing star formation.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Lee, and the PHANGS-HST Team; acknowledgment: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)

#NASA #MarshallSpaceFlightCenter #MSFC #Marshall #HubbleSpaceTelescope #HST #astronomy #space #astrophysics #Goddard #GoddardSpaceFlightCenter #ESA #EuropeanSpaceAgency #galaxy #supernova #solarsystemandbeyond #gsfc #galaxy

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More about the Hubble Space Telescope

NASA Media Usage Guidelines

Tags:   NASA NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center NASA Marshall Marshall MSFC Goddard Space Flight Center GSFC Hubble Hubble Space Telescope galaxy NGC 2835


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