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N 39 B 10.6K C 1 E Nov 17, 2018 F Dec 4, 2018
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Macon (/ˈmeɪkən/), officially Macon–Bibb County, is a consolidated city-county located in the state of Georgia, United States. Macon lies near the geographic center of the state, approximately 85 miles (137 km) south of Atlanta, hence the city's nickname "The Heart of Georgia."

Located near the fall line of the Ocmulgee River, Macon is the county seat of Bibb County and had a 2017 estimated population of 152,663.[4] Macon is the principal city of the Macon metropolitan area, which had an estimated population of 228,914 in 2017. Macon is also the largest city in the Macon–Warner Robins Combined Statistical Area (CSA), a larger trading area with an estimated 420,693 residents in 2017; the CSA abuts the Atlanta metropolitan area just to the north.

In a 2012 referendum, voters approved the consolidation of Macon and Bibb County, and Macon became Georgia's fourth-largest city (just after Columbus). The two governments officially merged on January 1, 2014.

Macon is served by three interstate highways: I-16 (connecting the city to Savannah and coastal Georgia), I-75 (connecting the city with Atlanta to the north and Valdosta to the south), and I-475 (a city bypass highway).

The city has several institutions of higher education, as well as numerous museums and tourism sites. The area is served by the Middle Georgia Regional Airport and the Herbert Smart Downtown Airport. The mayor of Macon is Robert Reichert, a former Democratic member of the Georgia House of Representatives. Reichert was elected mayor of the newly consolidated city of Macon–Bibb, and he took office on January 1, 2014.

Macon lies on the site of the Ocmulgee Old Fields, where the Creek Indians lived in the 18th century. Their predecessors, the Mississippian culture, built a powerful chiefdom (950–1100 AD) based on an agricultural village and constructed earthwork mounds for ceremonial, burial, and religious purposes. The areas along the rivers in the Southeast had been inhabited by indigenous peoples for 13,000 years before Europeans arrived.

Macon developed at the site of Fort Benjamin Hawkins, built in 1809 at the fall line of the Ocmulgee River to protect the community and to establish a trading post with Native Americans. The fort was named in honor of Benjamin Hawkins, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Southeast territory south of the Ohio River for over 20 years. He lived among the Creek and was married to a Creek woman. This was the most inland point of navigation on the river from the Low Country. President Thomas Jefferson forced the Creek to cede their lands east of the Ocmulgee River and ordered the fort built. (Archeological excavations in the 21st century found evidence of two separate fortifications.)

Fort Hawkins guarded the Lower Creek Pathway, an extensive and well-traveled American Indian network later improved by the United States as the Federal Road from Washington, D.C., to the ports of Mobile, Alabama and New Orleans, Louisiana. A gathering point of the Creek and U.S. cultures for trading, it was also a center of state militia and federal troops. The fort served as a major military distribution point during the War of 1812 against Great Britain and also during the Creek War of 1813. Afterward, the fort was used as a trading post for several years and was garrisoned until 1821. It was decommissioned about 1828 and later burned to the ground. A replica of the southeast blockhouse was built in 1938 and still stands today on a hill in east Macon. Part of the fort site is occupied by the Fort Hawkins Grammar School. In the 21st century, archeological excavations have revealed more of the fort's importance, and stimulated planning for additional reconstruction of this major historical site.

As many Europeans had already begun to move into the area, they renamed Fort Hawkins "Newtown." After the organization of Bibb County in 1822, the city was chartered as the county seat in 1823 and officially named Macon. This was in honor of the North Carolina statesman Nathaniel Macon, because many of the early residents of Georgia hailed from North Carolina. The city planners envisioned "a city within a park" and created a city of spacious streets and parks. They designated 250 acres (1.0 km2) for Central City Park, and passed ordinances requiring residents to plant shade trees in their front yards.

The city thrived due to its location on the Ocmulgee River, which enabled shipping to markets. Cotton became the mainstay of Macon's early economy, based on the enslaved labor of African Americans. Macon was in the Black Belt of Georgia, where cotton was the commodity crop. Cotton steamboats, stage coaches, and later, in 1843, a railroad increased marketing opportunities and contributed to the economic prosperity to Macon. In 1836, the Georgia Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church founded Wesleyan College in Macon. Wesleyan was the first college in the United States chartered to grant degrees to women. In 1855, a referendum was held to determine a capital city for Georgia. Macon came in last with 3,802 votes.

During the American Civil War, Macon served as the official arsenal of the Confederacy. Camp Oglethorpe, in Macon, was used first as a prison for captured Union officers and enlisted men. Later it held officers only, up to 2,300 at one time. The camp was evacuated in 1864.

Macon City Hall, which served as the temporary state capitol in 1864, was converted to a hospital for wounded Confederate soldiers. The Union General William Tecumseh Sherman spared Macon on his march to the sea. His troops had sacked the nearby state capital of Milledgeville, and Maconites prepared for an attack. Sherman, however, passed by without entering Macon.

The Macon Telegraph wrote that, of the 23 companies which the city had furnished the Confederacy, only enough men survived and were fit for duty to fill five companies by the end of the war. The human toll was very high.

The city was taken by Union forces during Wilson's Raid on April 20, 1865.

In the twentieth century, Macon grew into a prospering town in Middle Georgia. It began to serve as a transportation hub for the entire state. In 1895, the New York Times dubbed Macon "The Central City," in reference to the city's emergence as a hub for railroad transportation and textile factories. Terminal Station was built in 1916.

In 1994 Tropical Storm Alberto made landfall in Florida bringing 24 inches (61 cm) of rain, which resulted in major flooding in Georgia. Macon was one of the cities to suffer the worst flooding.

On May 11, 2008, an EF2 tornado touched down in nearby Lizella. The tornado then moved northeast to the southern shore of Lake Tobesofkee then continued into Macon and lifted near Dry Branch in Twiggs County. The tornado produced sporadic areas of major damage. Widespread straight-line wind damage was also produced along and south of the track of the tornado. The most significant damage was in Macon along Eisenhower Parkway and Pio Nono Avenue where two businesses were destroyed and several others were heavily damaged. Middle Georgia State College was also damaged by the tornado, snapping or uprooting around 50% of the campus trees and doing significant damage to several buildings on campus, with the gymnasium sustaining the worst damage. This tornado varied in intensity from EF0 to EF2 with the EF2 damage and winds up to 130 miles per hour (210 km/h) occurring near the intersection of Eisenhower Parkway and Pio Nono Avenue. Total path length was 18 miles (29 km) with a path width of 100 yards (91 m).[citation needed]

In 2012, voters in Macon and Bibb County approved a new consolidated government between the city and county, making the city's new boundary lines the same as the county's and deannexing a small portion of the city that once lay in Jones County.

Credit for the data above is given to the following website:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macon,_Georgia

Tags:   Macon Georgia USA cityscape city urban downtown density skyline skyscraper building high-rise architecture central business district Central Georgia cosmopolitan metropolis metropolitan metro commercial property Peach State real estate commercial district commercial office residential condominium tall building historical south deep south Macon–Bibb County The Heart of Georgia Fickling & Company BB&T

N 32 B 1.4K C 0 E Apr 22, 2017 F Apr 23, 2017
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West Palm Beach is a city in and the county seat of Palm Beach County, Florida, United States. It is one of the three main cities in South Florida. The population was 99,919 at the 2010 census. The University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) estimates a 2014 population of 104,031, a 4.1% increase from 2010. It is the oldest municipality in the Miami metropolitan area, having been incorporated as a city two years before Miami in November 1894. West Palm Beach is located approximately 68 miles (109 km) north of Downtown Miami. It is a principal city of the Miami metropolitan area, which was home to an estimated 6,012,331 people at the 2015 census.

Credit for the data above is given to the following website:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Palm_Beach,_Florida

Tags:   West Palm Beach Palm Beach County city cityscape urban downtown skyline South Florida density central business district skyscraper building architecture commercial property cosmopolitan metro metropolitan metropolis Sunshine State real estate high-rise

N 31 B 1.4K C 2 E Dec 24, 2019 F Dec 25, 2019
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Created to resemble back-to-back guitars, this iconic architectural masterpiece rises 461 feet into the sky and offers 638 luxury guest rooms and suites on 36 floors.

This complex is known by its authentic memorabilia that surrounds the grounds. They offer 638 upscale guestrooms in the first-ever Guitar Hotel. The adjacent Oasis Tower offers 168 luxury guestrooms, and 465 newly redesigned guestrooms in the original Hard Rock Hotel This resort is centrally located just 15 minutes from Fort Lauderdale’s beaches and 30 minutes from Miami.

Credit for the data above is given to the following website:
www.seminolehardrockhollywood.com/hotel
www.emporis.com/buildings/1276890/seminole-hard-rock-hote...
skyscraperpage.com/cities/?buildingID=107733

© All Rights Reserved - you may not use this image in any form without my prior permission.

Tags:   Hollywood Hollywood Beach city cityscape urban downtown skyline Broward County South Florida skyscraper building architecture commercial property cosmopolitan metro metropolitan metropolis Sunshine State real estate condominium palm trees high-rise urban palms beach hotels The Guitar Hotel at Seminole Hard Rock 1 Seminole Way Florida USA Built: 2019 rooms: 638 Height: 450 feet Klai Juba Wald Architects

N 182 B 2.6K C 1 E Mar 30, 2021 F Mar 30, 2021
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918 N Atlantic Ave is a hotel/motel located by the ocean on Daytona Beach, FL 32118. Built-in 1968, this property features 228 bathrooms, 2.78 acres lot, and 1.04 acres of living space.

The hotel offers panoramic ocean views, legendary amenities, and modern luxury await at Hard Rock Hotel Daytona Beach. Live large in the front row of one of America’s most famous beaches. Bask in the Florida sun at our oceanfront pool or grab a bite at our world-famous restaurant. When you stay here, you can do it all while rocking out in true Hard Rock fashion. From family vacations to business trips and destination weddings, Hard Rock Hotel Daytona Beach is an experience you won’t soon forget.

Credit for the data above is given to the following websites:
www.hardrockhotels.com/daytona-beach/
vcpa.vcgov.org/parcel/summary/?altkey=3383711#gsc.tab=0
www.realtytrac.com/property/fl/daytona-beach/32118/918-n-...
www.daytonabeach.com/listings/sessions-restaurant-at-hard...

© All Rights Reserved - you may not use this image in any form without my prior permission.

Tags:   business trips and destination weddings Hard Rock Hotel Daytona Beach 918 N Atlantic Avenue Daytona Beach Florida USA Built: 1968 Floors: 6 Sunshine State building architecture commercial property Volusia County north central Florida Atlantic Ocean street photography urban historical landmark panoramic views 228 bathrooms legendary amenities modern luxury Florida sun oceanfront pool vacation paradise tourist destination Mid Century Architecture world-famous restaurant family vacation spring break business trips destination weddings 2.78 acres lot, 1.04 living space, Sessions Restaurant

N 23 B 4.2K C 5 E Mar 7, 2017 F Mar 14, 2017
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This hill might not be of any significance in most places; however, in a place so flat like the state of Florida it is looked upon as an actual mountain.


Sugarloaf Mountain is the fifth highest named point in the state of Florida. At 312 feet (95 meters) above sea level it is also the highest point on the geographic Florida Peninsula. The mountain is in Lake County, near the town of Clermont. Comparatively, Florida's highest point, Britton Hill, rises to 345 feet (105 meters) above sea level in the Florida Panhandle. However, Sugarloaf Mountain is the most prominent point in the entire state.


Sugarloaf Mountain, located along the western shore of Lake Apopka in Lake County, Florida, is the northernmost named upland associated with the Lake Wales Ridge, a series of sand hills running south to Highlands County. The mountain, really a ridge with rolling dome-like peaks, rises abruptly from the surrounding flat terrain. Its prominence is thought to be 245 feet (74 meters), with its highest peak having a local prominence of approximately 200 feet (61 meters) relative to the surrounding ridge. Despite not being the highest point in Florida (which is Britton Hill near the Alabama border, the lowest high point of any U.S. state), Sugarloaf Mountain's summit is the most prominent peak in the state, and in a national ranking, is more prominent than the most prominent hills in both Louisiana and Delaware.


Prior to the 20th century, Sugarloaf Mountain was a wilderness dominated by sandhill and flatwood pine forests. By the 1920s, logging had stripped the mountain of its hardwood vegetation, permanently altering its native environment. Scrub began to grow on the mountain’s slopes, in addition to grapes, which were planted mostly to the south of the mountain for a decade or so.


By the 1940s, grape farming had declined due to fungal diseases, and it was replaced by citrus farming. Citrus plantations flourished on the flanks of Sugarloaf Mountain, providing the basis for the local economy until the 1980s, when freezes began to systematically devastate local groves. As the citrus industry faded, property on the mountain was rezoned for residential development, with value seen in the mountain’s panoramic views of the surrounding area. Other lands abutting the mountain, primarily along Lake Apopka, were preserved with the intention of restoring long absent ecologies. Only a few citrus plantations and vineyards managed to persist to the present day.


Sugarloaf Mountain’s geology is tied to the formation of Florida’s sand ridges, specifically the Lake Wales Ridge. The mountain consists of relict sand ridges and dunes formed in a marine shoreline environment approximately 2 million years ago during the Pleistocene epoch. Since the Pleistocene, the sands comprising the mountain have probably been uplifted due to isostatic rebound of the crust beneath the Florida Platform. The uplift is attributed to the karstification/erosion of the platform, which is reducing the weight on the underlying basement rock, triggering a process similar to post glacial rebound.


Sugarloaf Mountain was recently recognized for its scenic, cultural, and historic value. The state of Florida designated the Green Mountain Scenic Byway, which primarily traverses the eastern side of the mountain. The route offers rare panoramic views of the surrounding landscape and access to newly acquired ecological preserves and historic sites. Biking along the Byway as well as on other roads on the mountain has become popular, due to the challenge imposed by the relatively rugged terrain of the mountain compared to the surrounding area.


Sugarloaf Mountain also featured a golf course designed by the firm of Coore & Crenshaw. The course, part of the proposed private Sugarloaf Mountain Golf Club residential development, was somewhat unusual in Florida, and took advantage of the relatively prominent topography. The golf course was closed in 2012 due to low turnout and the inability for the planned development to take hold following the 2008 housing bubble and has remained abandoned since.


Credit for the data above is given to the following website:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugarloaf_Mountain_(Florida)

Tags:   Sugarloaf Mountain scenic scenic overlook hill sandhill panoramic Central Florida USA Florida Lake County geology nature Sunshine State clouds trees road gables house home bicyclist fence


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