Fluidr
about   tools   help   Y   Q   a         b   n   l
User / Marcial Bernabeu / Sets / Czech Republic 2013
107 items

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Chequia - Praga - Plaza de la ciudad vieja (Staromestské námestí) - Iglesia Ntra Sra de Tyn (Tynsky chrám)

Tags:   Chequia Republica Checa Republic Czech Czech Republic Republica Checa 2013 Marcial Bernabeu Praga Prague Praha Church Iglesia Old Town Tyn Bernabéu Monochrome Monocromo B&W Black White Blanco Negro Blanco y Negro Black and White Monocromático Black & White Marc

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Chequia - Praga - Plaza de la ciudad vieja (Staromestské námestí) - Ayuntamiento Viejo con Monumento a Jan Hus

Tags:   Chequia Republica Checa Republic Czech Czech Republic Republica Checa 2013 Marcial Bernabeu Praga Prague Praha Old Town Bernabéu Monochrome Monocromo B&W Black White Blanco Negro Blanco y Negro Black and White Monocromático Black & White Marc

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Chequia - Praga - Plaza de la ciudad vieja (Staromestské námestí) - Ayuntamiento Viejo - Reloj Astronómico (Staroměstský orloj)

********************************************************************************
ENGLISH:
The Prague astronomical clock, or Prague orloj (Czech: Pražský orloj [praʃskiː orloj]), is a medieval astronomical clock located in Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic. The clock was first installed in 1410, making it the third-oldest astronomical clock in the world and the oldest one still working.
The Orloj is mounted on the southern wall of Old Town City Hall in the Old Town Square. The clock mechanism itself is composed of three main components: the astronomical dial, representing the position of the Sun and Moon in the sky and displaying various astronomical details; "The Walk of the Apostles", a clockwork hourly show of figures of the Apostles and other moving sculptures—notably a figure of Death (represented by a skeleton) striking the time; and a calendar dial with medallions representing the months. According to local legend, the city will suffer if the clock is neglected and its good operation is placed in jeopardy and a skeleton, mounted on the clock, was supposed to nod his head in confirmation. Based on the legend, the only hope was represented by a boy born in the New Year's night.
The oldest part of the Orloj, the mechanical clock and astronomical dial, dates back to 1410 when it was made by clockmaker Mikuláš of Kadaň and Jan Šindel, the latter a professor of mathematics and astronomy at Charles University. The first recorded mention of the clock was on 9 October 1410. Later, presumably around 1490, the calendar dial was added and clock facade was decorated with gothic sculptures.
Formerly, it was believed that the Orloj was constructed in 1490 by clockmaster Jan Růže (also called Hanuš); this is now known to be a historical mistake. A legend, recounted by Alois Jirásek, has it that the clockmaker Hanuš was blinded on the order of the Prague Councillors so that he could not repeat his work; in turn, he broke down the clock, and no one was able to repair it for the next hundred years.
In 1552 it was repaired by Jan Taborský (ca1500–1572), master clockmaker of Klokotská Hora, who also wrote a report of the clock where he mentioned Hanuš as maker of this clock. This mistake, corrected by Zdeněk Horský, was due to an incorrect interpretation of records from the period. The mistaken assumption of Hanuš authorship is probably connected with his reconstruction of the Old Town Hall in years 1470-1473. The clock stopped working many times in the centuries after 1552, and was repaired many times.
In 1629 or 1659 wooden statues were added, and figures of the Apostles were added after major repair in 1787-1791. During the next major repair in years 1865-1866 the golden figure of a crowing rooster was added.
The Orloj suffered heavy damage on May 7 and especially May 8, 1945, during the Prague Uprising, when Germans set fire from several armoured vehicles and an anti-aircraft gun to the south-west side of the Old Town Square in an effort to silence the provocative broadcasting initiated by the National Committee on May 5. The hall and nearby buildings burned along with the wooden sculptures on the Orloj and the calendar dial face made by Josef Mánes. After significant effort, the machinery was repaired, the wooden Apostles restored by Vojtěch Sucharda, and the Orloj started working again in 1948.
The Orloj was last renovated in autumn 2005, when the statues and the lower ring were restored by Josef Manes. Wooden statues were covered with a net to keep pigeons away.
The astronomical dial is a form of mechanical astrolabe, a device used in medieval astronomy. Alternatively, one may consider the Orloj to be a primitive planetarium, displaying the current state of the universe.
The astronomical dial has a background that represents the standing Earth and sky, and surrounding it operate four main moving components: the zodiacal ring, an outer rotating ring, an icon representing the Sun, and an icon representing the Moon.
The background represents the Earth and the local view of the sky. The blue circle directly in the centre represents the Earth, and the upper blue is the portion of the sky which is above the horizon. The red and black areas indicate portions of the sky below the horizon. During the daytime, the Sun sits over the blue part of the background and at night it sits over the black. During dawn or dusk, the mechanical sun is positioned over the red part of the background.
Written on the eastern (left) part of the horizon is aurora (dawn in Latin) and ortus (rising). On the western (right) part is occasus (sunset), and crepusculum (twilight).
Golden Roman numbers at the outer edge of blue circle are the timescale of a normal 24-hour day and indicate time in local Prague time, or Central European Time. Curved golden lines dividing the blue part of dial into 12 parts are marks for unequal "hours". These hours are defined as 1/12 of the time between sunrise and sunset, and vary as the days grow longer or shorter during the year.
Inside the large black outer circle lies another movable circle marked with the signs of the zodiac which indicates the location of the Sun on the ecliptic. The signs are shown in anticlockwise order. In the photograph accompanying this section, the Sun is currently moving anticlockwise from Cancer into Leo.
The displacement of the zodiac circle results from the use of a stereographic projection of the ecliptic plane using the North pole as the basis of the projection. This is commonly seen in astronomical clocks of the period.
The small golden star shows the position of the vernal equinox, and sidereal time can be read on the scale with golden Roman numerals. Zodiac is on the 366 teeth gear inside the machine. This gear is connected to the sun gear and the moon gear by 24 teeth gear.
At the outer edge of the clock, golden Schwabacher numerals are set on a black background. These numbers indicate Old Czech Time (or Italian hours), with 24 indicating the time of sunset, which varies during the year from as early as 16:00 in winter to 20:16 in summer. This ring moves back and forth during the year to coincide with the time of sunset.
The golden Sun moves around the zodiacal circle, thus showing its position on the ecliptic. The sun is attached to an arm with a golden hand, and together they show the time in three different ways:
1.The position of the golden hand over the Roman numerals on the background indicates the time in local Prague time.
2.The position of the Sun over the curved golden lines indicates the time in unequal hours.
3.The position of the golden hand over the outer ring indicates the hours passed after sunset in Old Czech Time.
Additionally, the distance of the Sun from the center of the dial shows the time of sunrise and sunset. Sun and hand of the sun are at the 365 teeth gear inside the machine.
The movement of the Moon on the ecliptic is shown similarly to that of the Sun, although the speed is much faster (due to the Moon's own orbit around the Earth). The half-silvered sphere of the moon also shows the Lunar phase. Moon is on the 379 teeth gear inside the machine.
The four figures flanking the clock are set in motion at the hour, these represent four things that were despised at the time of the clock's making. From left to right in the photographs, the first is Vanity, represented by a figure admiring himself in a mirror. Next, the miser holding a bag of gold represents greed or usury. Across the clock stands Death, a skeleton that strikes the time upon the hour. Finally, the Turk tells pleasure and entertainment. On the hour, the skeleton rings the bell and immediately all other figures shake their heads, side to side, signifying their unreadiness "to go."
There is also a presentation of statues of the Apostles at the doorways above the clock, with all twelve presented every hour.


SPANISH:
El Reloj Astronómico de Praga (en checo: Staroměstský orloj) es un reloj astronómico medieval localizado en Praga, la capital de la República Checa. El Reloj se encuentra en la pared sur del ayuntamiento de la Ciudad Vieja de Praga, siendo una popular atracción turística.
Los tres principales componentes del Reloj son:
•El cuadrante astronómico, que además de indicar las 24 horas de día, representa las posiciones del sol y de la luna en el cielo, además de otros detalles astronómicos
•Las figuras animadas que incluyen "El paseo de los Apóstoles", un mecanismo de relojería que muestra, cuando el reloj da las horas, las figuras de los Doce Apóstoles.
•El calendario circular con medallones que representan los meses del año.
El cuadrante astronómico tiene forma de astrolabio, instrumento usado en la astronomía medieval y en la navegación hasta la invención del sextante. Tiene pintado sobre ella representaciones de la Tierra y del cielo, así como de los elementos que lo rodean, especialmente por cuatro componentes principales: el anillo zodiacal, el anillo de rotación, el icono que representa al sol y el icono que representa a la luna.
El fondo representa a la Tierra y la visión local del cielo. El círculo azul del centro representa nuestro planeta y el azul más oscuro la visión del cielo desde el horizonte. Las áreas rojas y negras indican las partes del cielo que se encuentran sobre el horizonte. Durante el día el sol se sitúa en la zona azul del fondo, mientras que por la noche pasa a situarse en la zona oscura. Desde que amanece hasta que anochece, la mecánica del sol hace que esté siempre posicionado sobre la zona roja. A la izquierda del reloj (el Este), encontramos la aurora y el amanecer; mientras en el oeste encontramos el ocaso y el crepúsculo.
Los números dorados del círculo azul representan las 24 horas del día (el formato estándar), marcando la hora civil de Praga. Pero encontramos también la división de 12 horas, que se definen por el tiempo entre el amanecer y el anochecer y que varía según la duración del día dependiendo de la estación del año.
En el interior del círculo negro, se encuentra otro círculo con los signos del zodiaco, indicando la localización del sol en la eclíptica. Los signos son mostrados en orden inverso al sentido del reloj. En la fotografía que acompaña a este artículo, el sol se encuentra en la constelación de Aries y moviéndose hacia la de Tauro.
La disposición del círculo zodiacal corresponde al uso de la proyección estereográfica del plano eclíptico que usa el Polo Norte como base de la proyección. Esta disposición es común en cualquier reloj astrológico de este periodo. La pequeña estrella dorada muestra la posición del equinoccio de verano; de esta forma los números romanos también podrían servir para medir el tiempo sideral.
En el borde exterior del reloj, el número Schwabacher dorado se encuentra sobre el fondo negro. Estos números indican las horas en la antigua Bohemia, que empieza con el 1 del anochecer. Los anillos se van moviendo durante el año y coinciden con el tiempo solar.
El sol dorado se mueve alrededor del círculo zodiacal, describiendo una elipse. El sol se junta con el brazo que tiene la mano dorada, y juntos nos muestran el tiempo de tres formas diferentes:
1.La posición de la mano de oro sobre los números romanos indican la hora local de Praga.
2.La posición del sol sobre las líneas doradas indican las horas en formato de horas desiguales.
3.La posición de la mano dorada sobre el anillo exterior indican las horas después del amanecer según el antiguo horario checo.
Además, la distancia entre el Sol y el centro de la esfera muestra el tiempo entre el anochecer y el amanecer.
El movimiento de la luna en la elipse se parece al del sol, aunque es mucho más rápido. La esfera lunar (una esfera plateada) muestra las fases de la luna.
Las cuatro figuras que flanquean el reloj son cuatro alegorías. De izquierda a derecha son:
•La Vanidad representada por un hombre que sostiene un espejo.
•La Avaricia representada por un comerciante judío con su bolsa.
•La Muerte representada por un esqueleto matando el tiempo.
•La Lujuria representada por un príncipe turco con su mandolina.
Cada hora entre las 9 de la mañana y las nueve de la noche las figuras se ponen en movimiento. El vanidoso se mira en el espejo, el avariento mueve su bolsa, el esqueleto blande su guadaña y tira de una cuerda, el lujurioso mueve la cabeza para mostrar que acecha siempre. Las dos ventanas se abren y empieza "El Paseo de los apóstoles". Los doce apóstoles desfilan lentamente asomándose a la ventana precedidos por San Pedro, gracias a un mecanismo circular en el interior sobre el que están ubicados seis a cada lado.
En la ventana izquierda aparece San Pablo manteniendo y una espada y un libro, le sigue Santo Tomás con un arpón, San Judas Tadeo con un libro en su mano izquierda, San Simón mostrando una sierra pues es el patrón de los leñadores, San Bartolomé con un libro y San Bernabé con un papiro.
En la ventana derecha aparece San Pedro con una llave, pues guarda las llaves del cielo. Le siguen San Mateo con un hacha pues es el patron de constructores, carpinteros y herreros, San Juan, San Andrés con una cruz y Santiago.1
Cuando las ventanas se cierran un gallo añadido en 1882 aletea y canta, después suenan las campanas en formato de 24 horas.
El calendario fue añadido al reloj en 1870. Los doce medallones representan los doce meses del año. Son obra del pintor checo Josef Mánes. Las cuatro esculturas laterales son de izquierda a derecha:
•Un filósofo
•Un ángel.
•Un astrónomo
•Un cronista.
Según la leyenda escrita por Alois Jirásek el mecanismo del reloj astronómico fue construido por el maestro Hanuš (cuyo verdadero nombre era Jan Růže) y por su ayudante Jakub Čech en 1490. Los ediles cegaron al maestro Hanus para que no pudiera construirse una copia del reloj. Čech vengó a su maestro introduciendo una mano en el mecanismo, atascándolo e inutilizándolo, a costa de quedar a su vez manco.
La parte más antigua del Reloj es el mecanismo del cuadrante astronómico que data de 1410, cuando fue construido por el relojero Nicolás de Kadan2 y por Jan Šindel profesor de matemáticas y astronomía de la Universidad Carolina de Praga.
Sucesivamente, alrededor de 1490, fueron añadidos el calendario y las esculturas góticas que decoran la fachada. El Reloj se paró varias veces a partir del 1552, y tuvo que ser reparado tantas veces como fallos tuvo. la reparación de 1552 fue realizada por Jan Táborský, quien escribió un informe en el cual menciona al maestro relojero Hanuš como diseñador del reloj, cuestión que se demostró ser falsa en el siglo XX.
En el siglo XVII se añadieron las estatuas móviles de los laterales del cuadrante astronómico. Las estatuas en madera de los apóstoles fueron añadidas durante la reparación de 1865-1866.
El Reloj sufrió fuertes daños los días 7 y 8 de mayo de 1945, horas antes de la capitulación alemana en Praga, que fue forzada por el avance del Ejército Rojo. Los soldados alemanes dirigieron sus ataques de vehículos blindados y de antiaéreos a la Vieja Ciudad de Praga en un esfuerzo por silenciar la iniciativa provocadora de la radio por parte de la resistencia checa iniciada el 5 de mayo. El ayuntamiento y los edificios cercanos fueron incendiados junto a las esculturas de madera del Reloj y la esfera del calendario de Josef Mánes. Se reparó la maquinaria, y los Apóstoles de madera fueron restaurados por Vojtěch Sucharda un famoso constructor de marionetas. El reloj volvió a funcionar a partir de 1948. El actual relojero Otakar Zámecník realizó una reparación general en 1994.
El Reloj de Praga es uno de los numerosos relojes astronómicos que se construyeron en los siglos XIV y XV. Otros relojes astronómicos fueron construidos en Norwich, San Albano, Wells, Lund, Estrasburgo, y Padua.

Tags:   Chequia Republica Checa Republic Czech Czech Republic Republica Checa 2013 Marcial Bernabeu Praga Prague Praha Old Town Astronomical Clock Reloj Astronomico Clock Reloj Ayuntamiento Town Hall Bernabéu Monochrome Monocromo B&W Black White Blanco Negro Blanco y Negro Black and White Monocromático Black & White Marc

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Chequia - Praga - Plaza de la ciudad vieja (Staromestské námestí) - Ayuntamiento Viejo - Reloj Astronómico (Staroměstský orloj)

********************************************************************************

ENGLISH:
The Prague astronomical clock, or Prague orloj (Czech: Pražský orloj [praʃskiː orloj]), is a medieval astronomical clock located in Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic. The clock was first installed in 1410, making it the third-oldest astronomical clock in the world and the oldest one still working.
The Orloj is mounted on the southern wall of Old Town City Hall in the Old Town Square. The clock mechanism itself is composed of three main components: the astronomical dial, representing the position of the Sun and Moon in the sky and displaying various astronomical details; "The Walk of the Apostles", a clockwork hourly show of figures of the Apostles and other moving sculptures—notably a figure of Death (represented by a skeleton) striking the time; and a calendar dial with medallions representing the months. According to local legend, the city will suffer if the clock is neglected and its good operation is placed in jeopardy and a skeleton, mounted on the clock, was supposed to nod his head in confirmation. Based on the legend, the only hope was represented by a boy born in the New Year's night.
The oldest part of the Orloj, the mechanical clock and astronomical dial, dates back to 1410 when it was made by clockmaker Mikuláš of Kadaň and Jan Šindel, the latter a professor of mathematics and astronomy at Charles University. The first recorded mention of the clock was on 9 October 1410. Later, presumably around 1490, the calendar dial was added and clock facade was decorated with gothic sculptures.
Formerly, it was believed that the Orloj was constructed in 1490 by clockmaster Jan Růže (also called Hanuš); this is now known to be a historical mistake. A legend, recounted by Alois Jirásek, has it that the clockmaker Hanuš was blinded on the order of the Prague Councillors so that he could not repeat his work; in turn, he broke down the clock, and no one was able to repair it for the next hundred years.
In 1552 it was repaired by Jan Taborský (ca1500–1572), master clockmaker of Klokotská Hora, who also wrote a report of the clock where he mentioned Hanuš as maker of this clock. This mistake, corrected by Zdeněk Horský, was due to an incorrect interpretation of records from the period. The mistaken assumption of Hanuš authorship is probably connected with his reconstruction of the Old Town Hall in years 1470-1473. The clock stopped working many times in the centuries after 1552, and was repaired many times.
In 1629 or 1659 wooden statues were added, and figures of the Apostles were added after major repair in 1787-1791. During the next major repair in years 1865-1866 the golden figure of a crowing rooster was added.
The Orloj suffered heavy damage on May 7 and especially May 8, 1945, during the Prague Uprising, when Germans set fire from several armoured vehicles and an anti-aircraft gun to the south-west side of the Old Town Square in an effort to silence the provocative broadcasting initiated by the National Committee on May 5. The hall and nearby buildings burned along with the wooden sculptures on the Orloj and the calendar dial face made by Josef Mánes. After significant effort, the machinery was repaired, the wooden Apostles restored by Vojtěch Sucharda, and the Orloj started working again in 1948.
The Orloj was last renovated in autumn 2005, when the statues and the lower ring were restored by Josef Manes. Wooden statues were covered with a net to keep pigeons away.
The astronomical dial is a form of mechanical astrolabe, a device used in medieval astronomy. Alternatively, one may consider the Orloj to be a primitive planetarium, displaying the current state of the universe.
The astronomical dial has a background that represents the standing Earth and sky, and surrounding it operate four main moving components: the zodiacal ring, an outer rotating ring, an icon representing the Sun, and an icon representing the Moon.
The background represents the Earth and the local view of the sky. The blue circle directly in the centre represents the Earth, and the upper blue is the portion of the sky which is above the horizon. The red and black areas indicate portions of the sky below the horizon. During the daytime, the Sun sits over the blue part of the background and at night it sits over the black. During dawn or dusk, the mechanical sun is positioned over the red part of the background.
Written on the eastern (left) part of the horizon is aurora (dawn in Latin) and ortus (rising). On the western (right) part is occasus (sunset), and crepusculum (twilight).
Golden Roman numbers at the outer edge of blue circle are the timescale of a normal 24-hour day and indicate time in local Prague time, or Central European Time. Curved golden lines dividing the blue part of dial into 12 parts are marks for unequal "hours". These hours are defined as 1/12 of the time between sunrise and sunset, and vary as the days grow longer or shorter during the year.
Inside the large black outer circle lies another movable circle marked with the signs of the zodiac which indicates the location of the Sun on the ecliptic. The signs are shown in anticlockwise order. In the photograph accompanying this section, the Sun is currently moving anticlockwise from Cancer into Leo.
The displacement of the zodiac circle results from the use of a stereographic projection of the ecliptic plane using the North pole as the basis of the projection. This is commonly seen in astronomical clocks of the period.
The small golden star shows the position of the vernal equinox, and sidereal time can be read on the scale with golden Roman numerals. Zodiac is on the 366 teeth gear inside the machine. This gear is connected to the sun gear and the moon gear by 24 teeth gear.
At the outer edge of the clock, golden Schwabacher numerals are set on a black background. These numbers indicate Old Czech Time (or Italian hours), with 24 indicating the time of sunset, which varies during the year from as early as 16:00 in winter to 20:16 in summer. This ring moves back and forth during the year to coincide with the time of sunset.
The golden Sun moves around the zodiacal circle, thus showing its position on the ecliptic. The sun is attached to an arm with a golden hand, and together they show the time in three different ways:
1.The position of the golden hand over the Roman numerals on the background indicates the time in local Prague time.
2.The position of the Sun over the curved golden lines indicates the time in unequal hours.
3.The position of the golden hand over the outer ring indicates the hours passed after sunset in Old Czech Time.
Additionally, the distance of the Sun from the center of the dial shows the time of sunrise and sunset. Sun and hand of the sun are at the 365 teeth gear inside the machine.
The movement of the Moon on the ecliptic is shown similarly to that of the Sun, although the speed is much faster (due to the Moon's own orbit around the Earth). The half-silvered sphere of the moon also shows the Lunar phase. Moon is on the 379 teeth gear inside the machine.
The four figures flanking the clock are set in motion at the hour, these represent four things that were despised at the time of the clock's making. From left to right in the photographs, the first is Vanity, represented by a figure admiring himself in a mirror. Next, the miser holding a bag of gold represents greed or usury. Across the clock stands Death, a skeleton that strikes the time upon the hour. Finally, the Turk tells pleasure and entertainment. On the hour, the skeleton rings the bell and immediately all other figures shake their heads, side to side, signifying their unreadiness "to go."
There is also a presentation of statues of the Apostles at the doorways above the clock, with all twelve presented every hour.


ESPAÑOL:
El Reloj Astronómico de Praga (en checo: Staroměstský orloj) es un reloj astronómico medieval localizado en Praga, la capital de la República Checa. El Reloj se encuentra en la pared sur del ayuntamiento de la Ciudad Vieja de Praga, siendo una popular atracción turística.
Los tres principales componentes del Reloj son:
•El cuadrante astronómico, que además de indicar las 24 horas de día, representa las posiciones del sol y de la luna en el cielo, además de otros detalles astronómicos
•Las figuras animadas que incluyen "El paseo de los Apóstoles", un mecanismo de relojería que muestra, cuando el reloj da las horas, las figuras de los Doce Apóstoles.
•El calendario circular con medallones que representan los meses del año.
El cuadrante astronómico tiene forma de astrolabio, instrumento usado en la astronomía medieval y en la navegación hasta la invención del sextante. Tiene pintado sobre ella representaciones de la Tierra y del cielo, así como de los elementos que lo rodean, especialmente por cuatro componentes principales: el anillo zodiacal, el anillo de rotación, el icono que representa al sol y el icono que representa a la luna.
El fondo representa a la Tierra y la visión local del cielo. El círculo azul del centro representa nuestro planeta y el azul más oscuro la visión del cielo desde el horizonte. Las áreas rojas y negras indican las partes del cielo que se encuentran sobre el horizonte. Durante el día el sol se sitúa en la zona azul del fondo, mientras que por la noche pasa a situarse en la zona oscura. Desde que amanece hasta que anochece, la mecánica del sol hace que esté siempre posicionado sobre la zona roja. A la izquierda del reloj (el Este), encontramos la aurora y el amanecer; mientras en el oeste encontramos el ocaso y el crepúsculo.
Los números dorados del círculo azul representan las 24 horas del día (el formato estándar), marcando la hora civil de Praga. Pero encontramos también la división de 12 horas, que se definen por el tiempo entre el amanecer y el anochecer y que varía según la duración del día dependiendo de la estación del año.
En el interior del círculo negro, se encuentra otro círculo con los signos del zodiaco, indicando la localización del sol en la eclíptica. Los signos son mostrados en orden inverso al sentido del reloj. En la fotografía que acompaña a este artículo, el sol se encuentra en la constelación de Aries y moviéndose hacia la de Tauro.
La disposición del círculo zodiacal corresponde al uso de la proyección estereográfica del plano eclíptico que usa el Polo Norte como base de la proyección. Esta disposición es común en cualquier reloj astrológico de este periodo. La pequeña estrella dorada muestra la posición del equinoccio de verano; de esta forma los números romanos también podrían servir para medir el tiempo sideral.
En el borde exterior del reloj, el número Schwabacher dorado se encuentra sobre el fondo negro. Estos números indican las horas en la antigua Bohemia, que empieza con el 1 del anochecer. Los anillos se van moviendo durante el año y coinciden con el tiempo solar.
El sol dorado se mueve alrededor del círculo zodiacal, describiendo una elipse. El sol se junta con el brazo que tiene la mano dorada, y juntos nos muestran el tiempo de tres formas diferentes:
1.La posición de la mano de oro sobre los números romanos indican la hora local de Praga.
2.La posición del sol sobre las líneas doradas indican las horas en formato de horas desiguales.
3.La posición de la mano dorada sobre el anillo exterior indican las horas después del amanecer según el antiguo horario checo.
Además, la distancia entre el Sol y el centro de la esfera muestra el tiempo entre el anochecer y el amanecer.
El movimiento de la luna en la elipse se parece al del sol, aunque es mucho más rápido. La esfera lunar (una esfera plateada) muestra las fases de la luna.
Las cuatro figuras que flanquean el reloj son cuatro alegorías. De izquierda a derecha son:
•La Vanidad representada por un hombre que sostiene un espejo.
•La Avaricia representada por un comerciante judío con su bolsa.
•La Muerte representada por un esqueleto matando el tiempo.
•La Lujuria representada por un príncipe turco con su mandolina.
Cada hora entre las 9 de la mañana y las nueve de la noche las figuras se ponen en movimiento. El vanidoso se mira en el espejo, el avariento mueve su bolsa, el esqueleto blande su guadaña y tira de una cuerda, el lujurioso mueve la cabeza para mostrar que acecha siempre. Las dos ventanas se abren y empieza "El Paseo de los apóstoles". Los doce apóstoles desfilan lentamente asomándose a la ventana precedidos por San Pedro, gracias a un mecanismo circular en el interior sobre el que están ubicados seis a cada lado.
En la ventana izquierda aparece San Pablo manteniendo y una espada y un libro, le sigue Santo Tomás con un arpón, San Judas Tadeo con un libro en su mano izquierda, San Simón mostrando una sierra pues es el patrón de los leñadores, San Bartolomé con un libro y San Bernabé con un papiro.
En la ventana derecha aparece San Pedro con una llave, pues guarda las llaves del cielo. Le siguen San Mateo con un hacha pues es el patron de constructores, carpinteros y herreros, San Juan, San Andrés con una cruz y Santiago.1
Cuando las ventanas se cierran un gallo añadido en 1882 aletea y canta, después suenan las campanas en formato de 24 horas.
El calendario fue añadido al reloj en 1870. Los doce medallones representan los doce meses del año. Son obra del pintor checo Josef Mánes. Las cuatro esculturas laterales son de izquierda a derecha:
•Un filósofo
•Un ángel.
•Un astrónomo
•Un cronista.
Según la leyenda escrita por Alois Jirásek el mecanismo del reloj astronómico fue construido por el maestro Hanuš (cuyo verdadero nombre era Jan Růže) y por su ayudante Jakub Čech en 1490. Los ediles cegaron al maestro Hanus para que no pudiera construirse una copia del reloj. Čech vengó a su maestro introduciendo una mano en el mecanismo, atascándolo e inutilizándolo, a costa de quedar a su vez manco.
La parte más antigua del Reloj es el mecanismo del cuadrante astronómico que data de 1410, cuando fue construido por el relojero Nicolás de Kadan2 y por Jan Šindel profesor de matemáticas y astronomía de la Universidad Carolina de Praga.
Sucesivamente, alrededor de 1490, fueron añadidos el calendario y las esculturas góticas que decoran la fachada. El Reloj se paró varias veces a partir del 1552, y tuvo que ser reparado tantas veces como fallos tuvo. la reparación de 1552 fue realizada por Jan Táborský, quien escribió un informe en el cual menciona al maestro relojero Hanuš como diseñador del reloj, cuestión que se demostró ser falsa en el siglo XX.
En el siglo XVII se añadieron las estatuas móviles de los laterales del cuadrante astronómico. Las estatuas en madera de los apóstoles fueron añadidas durante la reparación de 1865-1866.
El Reloj sufrió fuertes daños los días 7 y 8 de mayo de 1945, horas antes de la capitulación alemana en Praga, que fue forzada por el avance del Ejército Rojo. Los soldados alemanes dirigieron sus ataques de vehículos blindados y de antiaéreos a la Vieja Ciudad de Praga en un esfuerzo por silenciar la iniciativa provocadora de la radio por parte de la resistencia checa iniciada el 5 de mayo. El ayuntamiento y los edificios cercanos fueron incendiados junto a las esculturas de madera del Reloj y la esfera del calendario de Josef Mánes. Se reparó la maquinaria, y los Apóstoles de madera fueron restaurados por Vojtěch Sucharda un famoso constructor de marionetas. El reloj volvió a funcionar a partir de 1948. El actual relojero Otakar Zámecník realizó una reparación general en 1994.
El Reloj de Praga es uno de los numerosos relojes astronómicos que se construyeron en los siglos XIV y XV. Otros relojes astronómicos fueron construidos en Norwich, San Albano, Wells, Lund, Estrasburgo, y Padua.

Tags:   Chequia Republica Checa Republic Czech Czech Republic Republica Checa Marcial Bernabeu Praga Prague Praha Old Town Astronomical Clock Reloj Astronomico Clock Reloj Ayuntamiento Town Hall Bernabéu Monochrome Monocromo B&W Black White Blanco Negro Blanco y Negro Black and White Monocromático Black & White Marc

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Chequia - Praga - Sinagoga Vieja-Nueva


ENGLISH
The Old New Synagogue or Altneuschul (Czech: Staronová synagoga; German: Altneu-Synagoge) situated in Josefov, Prague, is Europe's oldest active synagogue. (The Scolanova Synagogue in Italy, also 13th century, was converted to a church by 1380 but was restored to synagogue use in 2006.) It is also the oldest surviving medieval synagogue of twin-nave design.
Completed in 1270 in gothic style, it was one of Prague's first gothic buildings. A still older Prague synagogue, known as the Old Synagogue, was demolished in 1867 and replaced by the Spanish Synagogue.

ESPAÑOL
La Sinagoga Staranová o Sinagoga Vieja-Nueva, en Praga (en checo Staronová synagoga v Praze) es una de las sinagogas más antiguas de Europa.
Fue fundada alrededor de 1270 y es uno de los primeros edificios de estilo gótico de la ciudad. Ha sobrevivido a los incendios, a la demolición del ghetto en el siglo XIX y a muchos pogromos. Está situada en Josefov, el barrio judío de Praga. Según la leyenda en el ático de la sinagoga se encuentra el cuerpo inerte del mítico Golem, que fue creado por el gran rabino Judah Loew.
Hay solamente una sinagoga del mismo tipo en Europa, La Sinagoga Vieja de Cracovia en Polonia.

Tags:   Chequia Republica Checa Republic Czech Czech Republic Republica Checa 2013 Marcial Bernabeu Praga Prague Praha Barrio judio Barrio judio Jewish Jewish Quarter Jewish Town Josefov Synagogue Sinagoga Bernabéu Monochrome Monocromo B&W Black White Blanco Negro Blanco y Negro Black and White Monocromático Black & White Marc


4.7%