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User / KM's Live Music shots
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30th January 2018 at the Edinburgh University Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, St Cecilia’s Hall, Edinburgh.

The Tuohitorvi is a Finnish wooden trumpet with with birch bark binding. It was originally used by shepherds to communicate and to scare away unwanted animals. There is a mouthpice, five finger holes and a thumbhole.

This instrument was made around 1975 in Finland.

Tuohitorvis are assigned the number 423.121.12 in the Hornbostel-Sachs classification of musical instruments ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornbostel-Sachs ), indicating:
4 = Aerophones. Sound is primarily produced by vibrating air. The instrument itself does not vibrate, and there are no vibrating strings or membranes.
42 = Non-free aerophones. The vibrating air is contained within the instrument.
423 = Trumpets. The player's vibrating lips set the air in motion.
423.1 = There are no means of changing the pitch apart from the player's lips.
423.12 = Tubular trumpets.
423.121 = End-blown trumpets. The mouth-hole faces the axis of the trumpet.
423.121.1 = End-blown straight trumpets. The tube is neither curved nor folded,
423.121.12 = With mouthpiece.

Tags:   Musical Instrument Hornbostel-Sachs Aerophone Tuohitorvi Finland St Cecilia’s Hall

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30th January 2018 at the Edinburgh University Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, St Cecilia’s Hall, Edinburgh.

The Post Horn is valveless cylindrical brass instrument with a cupped mouthpiece. It was used in the 18th and 19th centuries to signal the arrival or departure of a post rider or mail coach. There are both coiled and straight versions. The former were more common in Eorope, while the latter was adopted in Britain as the regulation instrument for use by Royal Mail coaches.

This instrument is a straight Post Horn made in the 1930s by Besson & Co, the London based maker of band instruments,

Straight Post Horns are assigned the number 423.121.12 in the Hornbostel-Sachs classification of musical instruments ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornbostel-Sachs ), indicating:
4 = Aerophones. Sound is primarily produced by vibrating air. The instrument itself does not vibrate, and there are no vibrating strings or membranes.
42 = Non-free aerophones. The vibrating air is contained within the instrument.
423 = Trumpets. The player's vibrating lips set the air in motion.
423.1 = There are no means of changing the pitch apart from the player's lips.
423.12 = Tubular trumpets.
423.121 = End-blown trumpets. The mouth-hole faces the axis of the trumpet.
423.121.1 = End-blown straight trumpets. The tube is neither curved nor folded,
423.121.12 = With mouthpiece.

Tags:   Musical Instrument Hornbostel-Sachs Aerophone Post Horn St Cecilia’s Hall

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30th January 2018 at the Edinburgh University Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, St Cecilia’s Hall, Edinburgh.

The Shofar is the horn of a Ram or other kosher animal used in Jewish religious ceremonies.

This instrument was made in Israel in the mid 1990s,

Shofars are assigned the number 423.1 in the Hornbostel-Sachs classification of musical instruments ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornbostel-Sachs ), indicating:
4 = Aerophones. Sound is primarily produced by vibrating air. The instrument itself does not vibrate, and there are no vibrating strings or membranes.
42 = Non-free aerophones. The vibrating air is contained within the instrument.
423 = Trumpets. The player's vibrating lips set the air in motion.
423.1 = There are no means of changing the pitch apart from the player's lips.

Tags:   Musical Instrument Hornbostel-Sachs Aerophone Shofar St Cecilia’s Hall

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30th January 2018 at the Edinburgh University Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, St Cecilia’s Hall, Edinburgh.

The Bass Drum is used to mark time. When used in a military or marching band they are usually played sideways in front of the musician. Their orignins lie in the Davul and Ottoman Empire bands.They are also part of the Drum Kit found in Jazz and popular music, and (with a Snare Drum) the traditional lineup of a New Orleans Brass Band.

This instrument was made around 1808, probably in Scotland. It is a military style Long Drum (confusingly the term is sometimes applied to Tenor Drums as well as Bass Drums) and is painted with the insignia of the Royal Perthshire Militia.

Bass Drums are assigned the number 211.212.1 in the Hornbostel-Sachs classification of musical instruments ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornbostel-Sachs ), indicating:
2 = Membranophones. Instruments where the sound is primarily produced by the vibration of a string or strings that are stretched between fixed points.
21 = Struck Membranophones. Sound is produced by hitting the drumskin with a hand or object.
211 = Directly Struck Membranophones. Instruments in which the membrane is struck directly.
211.2 = Tubular Drums. Instruments in which the body is tubular.
211.21 = Cylindrical Drums. Instruments in which the body has the same diameter at the middle and end.
211.212 = Instruments which have two usable membranes.
211.212.1 = single instruments.

Tags:   Musical Instrument Hornbostel-Sachs Membranophone Bass Drum Drums St Cecilia’s Hall

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30th January 2018 at the Edinburgh University Collection of Historic Musical Instruments, St Cecilia’s Hall, Edinburgh.

The Tom Drum or Tom-Tom is a cylindrical drum without snare wires which makes a booming, resonant sound which can vary in pitch. One or more of different depths, either mounted on a floorstand or on a rack above the Bass Drum, are part of the Drum Kit used in Jazz and Popular music. It is related to drums found in East Asia. The name echoes the Hindi Tam-Tam (with similar names in Sinhalese and Malay) and imitates the sound of the drum. The first Tom Toms were brought to the USA by Chinese and other immigrant groups in the second half of the 19 century. Then under the name “Chee Foo” Tom-Toms, they were then imported from China by American drum companies in the early 1920s (with a company logo added for US distribution). Jazz bands such as those of Fletcher Henderson and Duke Ellington used them to create an “oriental" or pseudo-African “jungle” sound. They were frequently painted colourfully, and initially had pigskin heads tacked or glued in place and thus could not be tuned. In 1922 Ludwig & Ludwig Drum Company produced the first drumset with two fully tunable Tom-Toms.and in 1930 Leedy’s introduced of the first American-made Tom-Toms. It was Gene Krupa in the 1930s who did much to popularise the Tom Drum.

This instrument was made in the middle of the twentieth century by Boosey and Hawkes in Britain.

Tom Drums are assigned the number 211.212.1 in the Hornbostel-Sachs classification of musical instruments ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornbostel-Sachs ), indicating:
2 = Membranophones. Instruments where the sound is primarily produced by the vibration of a string or strings that are stretched between fixed points.
21 = Struck Membranophones. Sound is produced by hitting the drumskin with a hand or object.
211 = Directly Struck Membranophones. Instruments in which the membrane is struck directly.
211.2 = Tubular Drums. Instruments in which the body is tubular.
211.21 = Cylindrical Drums. Instruments in which the body has the same diameter at the middle and end.
211.212 = Instruments which have two usable membranes.
211.212.1 = single instruments.

Tags:   Musical Instrument Hornbostel-Sachs Membranophone Tom Drum Drums St Cecilia’s Hall


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