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User / KAP Cris
Cris Benton / 11,198 items

N 1 B 223 C 2 E Mar 21, 2021 F Mar 23, 2021
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Wire management.

Background:

I have been flying a Canon M series mirrorless cameras as my principal kite aerial photography (KAP) gear since 2014. At last count, I had a little over 100 KAP sessions with rigs carrying the Canon M and M3 cameras (sound of Benton knocking on wood). I really like working with the smaller Canon M-series cameras. They are tough. The larger APS-C sensor is relatively smooth and the higher ISO settings are more useable.

During this strange pandemic year, I have found myself grounded for months at a time when my Special Use Permits for photography over the wetlands have been put on hold. I have used this downtime for various KAP-related projects: documented old KAP sessions, creating a cartographic index for my Salt Pond work, and building a new radio transmitter. I also set about creating a new HoVer KAP cradle for the Canon M6 Mk Ii camera. The M6 has been my primary “on the ground” camera for a bit over a year now so the novelty has worn off and it seemed fitting that I should send it airborne.

The cradle is now finished and I have had it up for a couple of sessions at my Berkeley Waterfront proving grounds.

This cradle is the 14th I have built since starting with KAP in 1994. All of its predecessors were built principally of wood components fitting to carbon-fiber-reinforced arrow shaft rails. This time around, I decided to make the components using Autodesk Fusion 360 for design and my Prusa Mk3s 3d printer for production using PLA filament. The end weights were:

Cradle empty ………………………………….…. 1 lb., 1-1/8 oz. (486 g)

Picavet and kite line attachments…………..….… 3-1/2 oz. (99 g)

Camera body with 11-22mm lens………….. 1 lb., 6-3/8 oz (636 g)

So, my all-up weight with the 11-22 mm lens is 2 lb. 11 oz. (1.22 Kg). This is about 65% of the weight of my previous Canon DSLR rig but a bit heavier than my previous M-series cradles.

More views of the rig are available in this set:
www.flickr.com/photos/kap_cris/sets/ 72157718763061467/

This rig uses a radio transmitter to rotate and tilt the camera. The radio can also switch the camera between portrait and landscape format (HoVer) as well as fire the shutter. For a description of the transmitter see:
arch.ced.berkeley.edu/kap/wind/?p=35

I am activating the EOS M shutter using a radio-controlled switch to trigger the wired remote jack in the camera.

Tags:   KAP equipment Canon M6 Mk II cradle

N 1 B 233 C 0 E Mar 21, 2021 F Mar 23, 2021
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Pan rotation gears.

Background:

I have been flying a Canon M series mirrorless cameras as my principal kite aerial photography (KAP) gear since 2014. At last count, I had a little over 100 KAP sessions with rigs carrying the Canon M and M3 cameras (sound of Benton knocking on wood). I really like working with the smaller Canon M-series cameras. They are tough. The larger APS-C sensor is relatively smooth and the higher ISO settings are more useable.

During this strange pandemic year, I have found myself grounded for months at a time when my Special Use Permits for photography over the wetlands have been put on hold. I have used this downtime for various KAP-related projects: documented old KAP sessions, creating a cartographic index for my Salt Pond work, and building a new radio transmitter. I also set about creating a new HoVer KAP cradle for the Canon M6 Mk Ii camera. The M6 has been my primary “on the ground” camera for a bit over a year now so the novelty has worn off and it seemed fitting that I should send it airborne.

The cradle is now finished and I have had it up for a couple of sessions at my Berkeley Waterfront proving grounds.

This cradle is the 14th I have built since starting with KAP in 1994. All of its predecessors were built principally of wood components fitting to carbon-fiber-reinforced arrow shaft rails. This time around, I decided to make the components using Autodesk Fusion 360 for design and my Prusa Mk3s 3d printer for production using PLA filament. The end weights were:

Cradle empty ………………………………….…. 1 lb., 1-1/8 oz. (486 g)

Picavet and kite line attachments…………..….… 3-1/2 oz. (99 g)

Camera body with 11-22mm lens………….. 1 lb., 6-3/8 oz (636 g)

So, my all-up weight with the 11-22 mm lens is 2 lb. 11 oz. (1.22 Kg). This is about 65% of the weight of my previous Canon DSLR rig but a bit heavier than my previous M-series cradles.

More views of the rig are available in this set:
www.flickr.com/photos/kap_cris/sets/ 72157718763061467/

This rig uses a radio transmitter to rotate and tilt the camera. The radio can also switch the camera between portrait and landscape format (HoVer) as well as fire the shutter. For a description of the transmitter see:
arch.ced.berkeley.edu/kap/wind/?p=35

I am activating the EOS M shutter using a radio-controlled switch to trigger the wired remote jack in the camera.

Tags:   KAP equipment Canon M6 Mk II cradle

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Maiden flight.

Background:

I have been flying a Canon M series mirrorless cameras as my principal kite aerial photography (KAP) gear since 2014. At last count, I had a little over 100 KAP sessions with rigs carrying the Canon M and M3 cameras (sound of Benton knocking on wood). I really like working with the smaller Canon M-series cameras. They are tough. The larger APS-C sensor is relatively smooth and the higher ISO settings are more useable.

During this strange pandemic year, I have found myself grounded for months at a time when my Special Use Permits for photography over the wetlands have been put on hold. I have used this downtime for various KAP-related projects: documented old KAP sessions, creating a cartographic index for my Salt Pond work, and building a new radio transmitter. I also set about creating a new HoVer KAP cradle for the Canon M6 Mk Ii camera. The M6 has been my primary “on the ground” camera for a bit over a year now so the novelty has worn off and it seemed fitting that I should send it airborne.

The cradle is now finished and I have had it up for a couple of sessions at my Berkeley Waterfront proving grounds.

This cradle is the 14th I have built since starting with KAP in 1994. All of its predecessors were built principally of wood components fitting to carbon-fiber-reinforced arrow shaft rails. This time around, I decided to make the components using Autodesk Fusion 360 for design and my Prusa Mk3s 3d printer for production using PLA filament. The end weights were:

Cradle empty ………………………………….…. 1 lb., 1-1/8 oz. (486 g)

Picavet and kite line attachments…………..….… 3-1/2 oz. (99 g)

Camera body with 11-22mm lens………….. 1 lb., 6-3/8 oz (636 g)

So, my all-up weight with the 11-22 mm lens is 2 lb. 11 oz. (1.22 Kg). This is about 65% of the weight of my previous Canon DSLR rig but a bit heavier than my previous M-series cradles.

More views of the rig are available in this set:
www.flickr.com/photos/kap_cris/sets/ 72157718763061467/

This rig uses a radio transmitter to rotate and tilt the camera. The radio can also switch the camera between portrait and landscape format (HoVer) as well as fire the shutter. For a description of the transmitter see:
arch.ced.berkeley.edu/kap/wind/?p=35

I am activating the EOS M shutter using a radio-controlled switch to trigger the wired remote jack in the camera.

Tags:   Berkeley California United States KAP equipment Canon M6 Mk II cradle

N 1 B 207 C 0 E Mar 21, 2021 F Mar 23, 2021
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The camera cradle's soft case placed in my main KAP pack.

Background:

I have been flying a Canon M series mirrorless cameras as my principal kite aerial photography (KAP) gear since 2014. At last count, I had a little over 100 KAP sessions with rigs carrying the Canon M and M3 cameras (sound of Benton knocking on wood). I really like working with the smaller Canon M-series cameras. They are tough. The larger APS-C sensor is relatively smooth and the higher ISO settings are more useable.

During this strange pandemic year, I have found myself grounded for months at a time when my Special Use Permits for photography over the wetlands have been put on hold. I have used this downtime for various KAP-related projects: documented old KAP sessions, creating a cartographic index for my Salt Pond work, and building a new radio transmitter. I also set about creating a new HoVer KAP cradle for the Canon M6 Mk Ii camera. The M6 has been my primary “on the ground” camera for a bit over a year now so the novelty has worn off and it seemed fitting that I should send it airborne.

The cradle is now finished and I have had it up for a couple of sessions at my Berkeley Waterfront proving grounds.

This cradle is the 14th I have built since starting with KAP in 1994. All of its predecessors were built principally of wood components fitting to carbon-fiber-reinforced arrow shaft rails. This time around, I decided to make the components using Autodesk Fusion 360 for design and my Prusa Mk3s 3d printer for production using PLA filament. The end weights were:

Cradle empty ………………………………….…. 1 lb., 1-1/8 oz. (486 g)

Picavet and kite line attachments…………..….… 3-1/2 oz. (99 g)

Camera body with 11-22mm lens………….. 1 lb., 6-3/8 oz (636 g)

So, my all-up weight with the 11-22 mm lens is 2 lb. 11 oz. (1.22 Kg). This is about 65% of the weight of my previous Canon DSLR rig but a bit heavier than my previous M-series cradles.

More views of the rig are available in this set:
www.flickr.com/photos/kap_cris/sets/ 72157718763061467/

This rig uses a radio transmitter to rotate and tilt the camera. The radio can also switch the camera between portrait and landscape format (HoVer) as well as fire the shutter. For a description of the transmitter see:
arch.ced.berkeley.edu/kap/wind/?p=35

I am activating the EOS M shutter using a radio-controlled switch to trigger the wired remote jack in the camera.

Tags:   KAP equipment Canon M6 Mk II cradle

N 1 B 159 C 0 E Mar 21, 2021 F Mar 23, 2021
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Cradle components broken down to fit into case.

Background:

I have been flying a Canon M series mirrorless cameras as my principal kite aerial photography (KAP) gear since 2014. At last count, I had a little over 100 KAP sessions with rigs carrying the Canon M and M3 cameras (sound of Benton knocking on wood). I really like working with the smaller Canon M-series cameras. They are tough. The larger APS-C sensor is relatively smooth and the higher ISO settings are more useable.

During this strange pandemic year, I have found myself grounded for months at a time when my Special Use Permits for photography over the wetlands have been put on hold. I have used this downtime for various KAP-related projects: documented old KAP sessions, creating a cartographic index for my Salt Pond work, and building a new radio transmitter. I also set about creating a new HoVer KAP cradle for the Canon M6 Mk Ii camera. The M6 has been my primary “on the ground” camera for a bit over a year now so the novelty has worn off and it seemed fitting that I should send it airborne.

The cradle is now finished and I have had it up for a couple of sessions at my Berkeley Waterfront proving grounds.

This cradle is the 14th I have built since starting with KAP in 1994. All of its predecessors were built principally of wood components fitting to carbon-fiber-reinforced arrow shaft rails. This time around, I decided to make the components using Autodesk Fusion 360 for design and my Prusa Mk3s 3d printer for production using PLA filament. The end weights were:

Cradle empty ………………………………….…. 1 lb., 1-1/8 oz. (486 g)

Picavet and kite line attachments…………..….… 3-1/2 oz. (99 g)

Camera body with 11-22mm lens………….. 1 lb., 6-3/8 oz (636 g)

So, my all-up weight with the 11-22 mm lens is 2 lb. 11 oz. (1.22 Kg). This is about 65% of the weight of my previous Canon DSLR rig but a bit heavier than my previous M-series cradles.

More views of the rig are available in this set:
www.flickr.com/photos/kap_cris/sets/ 72157718763061467/

This rig uses a radio transmitter to rotate and tilt the camera. The radio can also switch the camera between portrait and landscape format (HoVer) as well as fire the shutter. For a description of the transmitter see:
arch.ced.berkeley.edu/kap/wind/?p=35

I am activating the EOS M shutter using a radio-controlled switch to trigger the wired remote jack in the camera.
Background:

I have been flying a Canon M series mirrorless cameras as my principal kite aerial photography (KAP) gear since 2014. At last count, I had a little over 100 KAP sessions with rigs carrying the Canon M and M3 cameras (sound of Benton knocking on wood). I really like working with the smaller Canon M-series cameras. They are tough. The larger APS-C sensor is relatively smooth and the higher ISO settings are more useable.

During this strange pandemic year, I have found myself grounded for months at a time when my Special Use Permits for photography over the wetlands have been put on hold. I have used this downtime for various KAP-related projects: documented old KAP sessions, creating a cartographic index for my Salt Pond work, and building a new radio transmitter. I also set about creating a new HoVer KAP cradle for the Canon M6 Mk Ii camera. The M6 has been my primary “on the ground” camera for a bit over a year now so the novelty has worn off and it seemed fitting that I should send it airborne.

The cradle is now finished and I have had it up for a couple of sessions at my Berkeley Waterfront proving grounds.

This cradle is the 14th I have built since starting with KAP in 1994. All of its predecessors were built principally of wood components fitting to carbon-fiber-reinforced arrow shaft rails. This time around, I decided to make the components using Autodesk Fusion 360 for design and my Prusa Mk3s 3d printer for production using PLA filament. The end weights were:

Cradle empty ………………………………….…. 1 lb., 1-1/8 oz. (486 g)

Picavet and kite line attachments…………..….… 3-1/2 oz. (99 g)

Camera body with 11-22mm lens………….. 1 lb., 6-3/8 oz (636 g)

So, my all-up weight with the 11-22 mm lens is 2 lb. 11 oz. (1.22 Kg). This is about 65% of the weight of my previous Canon DSLR rig but a bit heavier than my previous M-series cradles.

More views of the rig are available in this set:
www.flickr.com/photos/kap_cris/sets/ 72157718763061467/

This rig uses a radio transmitter to rotate and tilt the camera. The radio can also switch the camera between portrait and landscape format (HoVer) as well as fire the shutter. For a description of the transmitter see:
arch.ced.berkeley.edu/kap/wind/?p=35

I am activating the EOS M shutter using a radio-controlled switch to trigger the wired remote jack in the camera.

Tags:   KAP equipment Canon M6 Mk II cradle


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