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User / jbarc in BC / Sets / Bandon Beach Oregon
John Barclay / 9 items

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A tripod sunset photo at Bandon Beach, Oregon. Day 1 of a photo workshop with Jason Odell from Colorado

Tags:   sunset rocks Bandon Beach Oregon beach ocean surf tide waves landscape Nikon Z7 tripod sundown light sun orange seagull seagulls birds flight Pacific Pacific Ocean coast coastline sand erosion Beach Loop Road

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Bandon Beach, Oregon
A 25 second long exposure after sunset

Tags:   Bandon Beach beach surf ocean landscape Oregon long exposure tide tidal Pacific West coast Nikon Z7 tripod rocks erosion panorama cloud mist Bandon

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Early morning on the coast of Oregon

Tags:   beach Bandon Beach Oregon USA surf moonshine moonlight ocean rocks tide moon sand Nikon Z7 long exposure telephoto tripod

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Bandon Beach, Oregon

Tags:   ocean sand tide tides Beach Bandon Beach Oregon tripod dawn sky clouds mist Nikon Z7 surf long exposure reflections Pacific

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Bandon Beach, Oregon
Wide angle HDR with the distant early morning moon in the background sky. A very odd shaped sea stack rock. It is properly known as Wizard's Hat.


A stack or sea stack is a geological landform consisting of a steep and often vertical column or columns of rock in the sea near a coast, formed by wave erosion. Stacks are formed over time by wind and water, processes of coastal geomorphology. They are formed when part of a headland is eroded by hydraulic action, which is the force of the sea or water crashing against the rock. The force of the water weakens cracks in the headland, causing them to later collapse, forming free-standing stacks and even a small island. Without the constant presence of water, stacks also form when a natural arch collapses under gravity, due to sub-aerial processes like wind erosion. Erosion causes the arch to collapse, leaving the pillar of hard rock standing away from the coast—the stack. Eventually, erosion will cause the stack to collapse, leaving a stump. Stacks can provide important nesting locations for seabirds, and many are popular for rock climbing.

Tags:   Bandon Beach Oregon USA rock hat dwarf sand tide ocean Pacific HDR cloud west sky barnacles erosion wind moon tripod


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