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User / Gary Helm
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N 139 B 842 C 64 E Jun 10, 2020 F Jul 10, 2020
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Named for its loud ‘bob white’ call, this quail is a small chunky bird with short rounded wings. Males have a black cap, white throat and chin, and a white stripe through and above the eye to the back of the head. Females have a tan colored throat and no black neck collar.

Bobwhite quail live in bushy areas interspersed with fields. They prefer edges, fence rows and areas with vegetative cover.

Bobwhites are active during the day; they feed on seeds, fruit, insects and green plants. Pairs are monogamous with pair bonds sometimes persisting between breeding seasons. Males advertise during the May to August breeding season with a distinctive bob-bob-white call.

Females lay large clutches of up to 14 eggs, which hatch after 23 days. The precocial young are about the size of a quarter coin, and feed largely on insects. The chicks double their weight every 10 days can fly within 2-3 weeks.

Bobwhites are commonly seen in groups known as coveys. Coveys usually consist of about 10-30 birds, depending on the time of year. Every night, for safety, the covey forms a circle with their heads facing outwards, away from each other and their tails together. If a predator startles them, the covey flushes in all directions.

Bobwhite quail are a popular game bird in the United States. In 1970 an estimated 35 million of them were shot. In the southeastern US these tiny birds were instrumental in the preservation of some of the best examples of old growth high pine.

I found this male along Joe Overstreet Road in Osceola County, Florida.

Tags:   Northern Bob White Quail bird birds fly flight feathers perch Post Fence post nature wildlife outside outdoor animal image photograph Florida Osceola County Florida Wildlife ghelm4747 Gary Helm male Joe Overstreet Road coveys seeds fruit insects Green Plants flushes canon camera SX60HS PowerShot United States North America anding

N 100 B 887 C 43 E Feb 4, 2019 F Jul 8, 2020
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An annual plant native to the Americas, the sunflower (Helianthus annuus) has been used since prehistoric times for ornamental and ceremonial uses, as well as for food. To date, the earliest domesticated sunflower seed was found at the San Andrés site in Tabasco, Mexico, dated to between 4,500-4,800 years ago. The second oldest domesticated sunflower seed discovered and dated to 4265 years ago, was found at the Hayes site in Tennessee.

I found this one and a small group of others, not that long ago, in my front yard. I didn't plant it. My guess is a few escapes from my bird feeder. Frostproof, Polk County, Florida.

Tags:   Flower Sunflower yellow orange green outside outdoor ghelm4747 Gary Helm Florida nature Polk County Frostproof Front yard micro bee insects plant beautifull image macro photograph Annual Americas United States Canon camera SX60HS PowerShot seed blossom

N 168 B 1.3K C 83 E Jun 23, 2020 F Jul 5, 2020
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There’s no mistaking when a Blue Jay is near. They are notoriously noisy birds with songs consisting of a large variety of calls, the most popular being a harsh “jeer” and a loud “Jay! Jay! Jay!” Blue Jays have been known to imitate calls of hawks. By nature, they are very aggressive and territorial. They squawk to warn predators to stay away or to call their flock. They protect against hawks, raccoons, cats, snakes, squirrels, falcons and even humans from their nests. At other times, the Blue Jay sings softly like a songbird.

Blue jays are intelligent. Captive blue jays have been known to use tools. When a piece of food drops outside of their cage, the birds have been known to make tools out of strips of newspaper to push the food within reach. They are able to store their food underground for later use and they are able to warn when danger is near.

In Florida, the Blue Jay is found in a wide variety
of habitats other than the populated areas where they are
so well known, including agricultural environments,
hardwood swamps, hammocks, pine flat woods, mixed forests, and sand hills.

I found this Juvenile in my backyard. Lake Wales, Florida.

Tags:   Blue Jay bird birds animal blue sing feathers fly flight perch image photograph nature wildlife outdoor ghelm4747 Gary Helm Juvenile backyard Lake Wales Florida Polk County Florida Wildlife Lake Pierce outside Looking out my backdoor noisy aggresive territorial intelligent song bird canon camera SX60HS PowerShot sand hills Mixed Forest United States Of America North America North America

N 162 B 1.5K C 74 E Jun 28, 2020 F Jul 3, 2020
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The Great Crested Flycatcher is an aggressive Tyrant Flycatcher, nesting in a variety of woodland and suburban habitats.

From exposed perches it searches for insects and vigorously defends its territory against intruders. Most of the Great Crested Flycatcher's diet consists of flying insects, such as beetles, flies, wasps, katydids, and dragonflies, although fruits of the elderberry, wild cherry, and blackberry are eaten by both adults and young.

It is the one and only flycatcher that breeds in Florida.

The Great Crested Flycatcher is the only eastern flycatcher that nests in holes.
An unusual habit is its frequent use of shed snake skins in its nest lining. Whether this is intended to frighten off predators or merely decorate the nest is not known.
They spend much of their time perched on treetops and prefer to fly from place to place on the ground rather than walk or hop.

I found this one in my backyard during a rare moment on the ground taking a dust (sand) bath.
Polk County, Florida.

Tags:   bird birds Great Crested Flycatcher fly flight feathers wings bath sand dust dirt insects image photograph Florida animal Polk County backyard Lake Wales Lake Pierce nature wildlife outside outdoor Florida Wildlife Bath time ghelm4747 Gary Helm canon camera Sx60HS PowerShot United States U.S.A. tyrant Flycatcher breeds in Florida aggresive woodland suburban bugs beatles flys wasp Dragonflies fruits treetops perched Looking out my backdoor rare moment

N 426 B 4.4K C 129 E Jun 28, 2020 F Jun 29, 2020
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The Carolina Wren is easily recognized by the white stripe above each eye and its distinctive "tail-up" posture that it assumes as it flits about the bushes. Energetic and vocal this little wren has one of the loudest songs of any small bird. Males sing their “tea-kettle-tea-kettle-tea-kettle-tea." song hundreds of times a day, all year long. One particularly busy bird was recorded singing almost 3,000 times in a single day!


Carolina wrens form lifelong pair bonds and pairs often stay together for years. The birds move and feed together, where you see one, you will usually see its mate foraging close by. The pair works together to build a nest, which can be in a tree hole or on a branch, but Carolina wrens are well known for choosing to nest in man made structures such as mail boxes, door wreaths, flower pots, or even a cardboard box in a garage. They use sticks, hair, feathers, and anything that looks suitable—even shed snake skins. They often build multiple nests then select one to raise their chicks.


When feeding, a Carolina wren hops around on the ground and in the underbrush turning over dead leaves, and probing cracks and crannies for spiders, insects and larvae. They also eat fruit and berries, but rarely come to bird feeders.


A female lays 3-4 eggs, then incubates them for 14 days, during which time the male brings her food. The parents feed the chicks in the nest for two weeks, then, after the chicks fledge, the parents continue to feed them for a further two weeks. A pair of Carolina wrens can have three broods in a year.

I found this one in my backyard in Polk County, Florida.

Tags:   Carolina Wren bird birds nature wildlife outside outdoor perch Florida Wildlife image photograph fly flight feathers backyard Polk County Lake Wales Florida. Lake Pierce water yard ghelm4747 Gary Helm hops fruit spiders bugs worms berries Tail up vocal Loudest song canon camera SX60HS PowerShot bushes shrub leaves Explore


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