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Judy Schmidt / 850 items

N 317 B 10.5K C 13 E Oct 16, 2020 F Oct 16, 2020
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The same mosaics from this view except using the 8 micron data for luminosity, and the other three channels for color. This significantly reduces the starlight signal, though not totally. Still makes it much easier to see the dust and emission nebulas.

Note that much of the nebulosity is in the foreground as we view the Milky Way's center through one of the arms of the Milky Way. It is difficult to discern or even measure the distance to each piece, but generally, the larger structures that extend far away from flat central plane are foreground objects, while thinner, smaller pieces that remain close to the plane are closer to the core. Many of these smaller objects are overlapped and obscured by mid and foreground objects.

Luminosity: 8.0 µm (IRAC4)
Red: 5.8 µm (IRAC3)
Green: 4.5 µm (IRAC2)
Blue: 3.6 µm (IRAC1)

The image is presented in galactic coordinates, with north up in that regard.

N 47 B 984 C 4 E Oct 13, 2020 F Oct 13, 2020
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This is a view using FITS file mosaics generously provided courtesy of Susan Stolovy, with attribution to Rick Arendt and Solange Ramirez for their work in producing the final mosaics. Her team used a processing technique that alleviated some of the saturation issues arising in some of the brighter parts of the mosaic that one might find in the mosaics provided by the Spitzer archive.

My take is not necessarily much different than what's already been done, but it is quite a bit less saturated than what you can find on the Spitzer website, and just a bit more of those wispy dust and gas formations can be made out. Anyway, it's nice to work with some data where someone else has already done most of the work.

For reference, here is a link to the original version using the same wavelengths on the Spitzer website: www.spitzer.caltech.edu/images/1540-ssc2006-02a-A-Cauldro...

Screen: 8.0 µm (IRAC4)
Red: 5.8 µm (IRAC3)
Green: 4.5 µm (IRAC2)
Blue: 3.6 µm (IRAC1)

The image is presented in galactic coordinates, with north up in that regard.

Tags:   Milky Way Spitzer infrared dust gas Sgr A* center core nucleus IRAC

N 544 B 13.9K C 28 E Aug 17, 2020 F Aug 17, 2020
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Recent observations revealing the many-armed, beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 2336 as only Hubble can. The imagery used to create this image was taken in January 2020. Meanwhile, the Chandra X-ray Observatory is also tasked with looking at this galaxy, though I haven't looked into the details of that, yet.

Edit: Checked on CXO observations, and so far none yet, but I did notice that of the proposed 200 kilosecond time, they only gave Dr. Antoniou 50 ks. Ouch! Here's hoping that's enough.

Data from the following proposal was used to create this image:
Determining How X-ray Binary Populations Vary Through Time

Note there are a number of blank areas in the image where data were absent. I filled those with background-matched noise to make them visually unobtrusive. Some other areas also lack a full range of color, being only covered by 1-2 filters.

The pixel scale is 0.05 arcseconds per pixel.

Red: ACS/WFC F814W
Green: ACS/WFC F555W
Blue: ACS/WFC F435W

North is exactly to the right.

Tags:   HST Hubble spiral galaxy arms

N 23 B 3.3K C 1 E Aug 14, 2020 F Aug 13, 2020
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Not quite elliptical, not quite a spiral... it's lenticular. Love these subtle, ghostly galaxies. Very little dust or star formation to speak of, leaving the stellar structure plainly visible, though highly diffuse.

Data from the following ambitious proposal were used to create this image: Every Known Nearby Galaxy

Red: ACS/WFC F814W
Green: Pseudo
Blue: ACS/WFC F606W

Tags:   HST Hubble lenticular galaxy bar barred

N 26 B 3.0K C 0 E Aug 12, 2020 F Aug 12, 2020
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The same quasar seen in four separate instances due to the effect of the foreground mass intervening between the viewer and the quasar, causing distorted light paths, otherwise known as gravitational lensing.

Data from the following proposal were used to create this image:
H0, the stellar initial mass function, and other dark matters from a large sample of quadruply imaged quasars

Pixel scale is 0.0396 arcseconds per pixel.

WFC3/IR F160W was used as a "screen" layer for both the green and blue channels.

Red: WFC3/IR F160W
Green: WFC3/UVIS F814W
Blue: WFC3/UVIS F475X

North is up.

Tags:   HST Hubble quasar gravitational lens lensing Einstein ring


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