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User / Robert Warren / Sets / Barcelona
Bob Warren / 4 items

N 7 B 720 C 24 E Apr 19, 2011 F Jun 2, 2011
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We took a long walk late at night on our last night in Barcelona; the street was alive with boulevard cafes and people strolling; a beautiful time of night in a beautiful city.
3 shot handheld HDR;
f / 4.0; ISO 800

N 4 B 297 C 12 E Apr 19, 2011 F Jun 2, 2011
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Another view (detail) of the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, Sp. This image was also shot on the day of the fire (April 19, '11), a cloudy morning. What's really interesting to see are the number of construction cranes - we counted 8 on this day - still at work creating this massive structure after all these decades of work.

3-shot handheld HDR; f / 8, ISO 200; +2 / 2 / -2 EV

N 2 B 508 C 8 E Apr 19, 2011 F Jun 1, 2011
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This is a detail shot, a portion of the huge Sagrada Família, a large Roman Catholic church in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, designed by Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí (1852–1926). Although incomplete, the church is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and in November 2010 was consecrated and proclaimed a minor basilica by Pope Benedict XVI.

Though construction of Sagrada Família had commenced in 1882, when Gaudí took over the project in 1883 he transformed it with his architectural and engineering style—combining Gothic and curvilinear, Modernista forms with ambitious structural columns and arches.

Gaudí devoted his last years to the project and at the time of his death in 1926, (he was hit by a tram on the street in Barcelona and is buried in a crypt in the Sagrada) less than a quarter of the project was complete. Sagrada Família's construction progressed slowly as it relied on private donations and was interrupted by the Spanish Civil War—only to resume intermittent progress in the 1950s. Construction passed the mid-point in 2010 with some of the project's greatest challenges remaining and an anticipated completion date of 2026—the centennial of Gaudí's death. The basílica has a long history of dividing the citizens of Barcelona—over the initial possibility it might compete with Barcelona's cathedral, over Gaudí's design itself, over the possibility that work after Gaudí's death disregarded his design, and the recent possibility that an underground tunnel of Spain's high-speed train could disturb its stability.

On April 19, 2011, a day when we happened to be visiting the Sagrada, a small fire was started in the church by an arsonist. There were no injuries, and 1,500 people were safely evacuated from the building, which suffered little damage. The image above shows smoke from this fire.

N 0 B 1.3K C 9 E Apr 19, 2011 F May 31, 2011
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Barcelona Cathedral #1; The original history posted here was placed in error. That history described this shot as the Sagrada Familia, which it clearly is not. This is the Barcelona Cathedral,

The cathedral was constructed throughout the 13th to 15th centuries, with the principal work done in the 14th century. The cloister, which encloses the Well of the Geese (Font de les Oques) was completed about 1450. The neo-Gothic façade was constructed over the nondescript exterior that was common to Catalan churches in the 19th century. The roof is notable for its gargoyles, featuring a wide range of animals, both domestic and mythical.
The cathedral was constructed over the crypt of a former Visigothic chapel, dedicated to Saint James. Its site faced the Roman forum of Barcelona.
It is a hall church, vaulted over five aisles, the outer two divided into chapels. The transept is truncated. The east end is a chevet of nine radiating chapels connected by an ambulatory. The high altar is raised, allowing a clear view into the crypt.

The cathedral is dedicated to Eulalia of Barcelona, co-patron saint of Barcelona, a young virgin who, according to Catholic tradition, suffered martyrdom during Roman times in the city. One story says that she was exposed naked in the public square and a miraculous snowfall in mid-spring covered her nudity. The enraged Romans put her into a barrel with knives stuck into it and rolled it down a street (according to tradition, the one now called 'Baixada de Santa Eulalia'). The body of Saint Eulalia is entombed in the cathedral's crypt.


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