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Ethan Winning / 2,424 items

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I diddled with software for well over an hour to get rid of the lodge overhang. Pixel by pixel. And then it dawned on me that I have neither the patience nor the skill nor the inclination nor the software to do it well enough. It may be why I've held back for a decade! But he's too cute to leave in an archive.

This guy was on a boulder outside the Wuksachi Lodge at Sequoia NP, either begging or preaching. From the looks of him, his sermons have produced the effect he desired.

He's a Golden-mantled ground squirrel, a little larger than most chipmunk species I've seen in the west. You can tell he's not a chipmunk by the absence of stripes on the head. (Did I get that right, Gerry?) I think that chipmunks might also have longer snouts than GMGS. But, he's as cute and fast as any species.

Tags:   Golden-mantled ground squirrel Sequoia National Park Wuksachi Canon SX 20 years ago Overhang from lodge

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Seven years ago yesterday, this female Ring-necked duck did me the honor of paddling perhaps 20 feet away in a much better cared-for (than today) lagoon at Heather Farm. The reeds were allowed to grow in winter, and were cut back by half only every other year. The Ring-necked duck winters in about half the U.S. from the west coast to Florida, and breeds in about half of Canada from B.C. to Newfoundland.

The hardest thing about photographing this bird is to capture the very thin purple band around the male's neck. Both male and female show that this dabbling duck should have been name the "Ring-billed!"

Tags:   Ringed-necked duck Aythya collaris Coast Canada U.S. Canon SX 40 Copyright Ethan A. Winning Heather Farm Reserve Walnut Creek California

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This is Louise Lake in Mt. Rainier, not Lake Louise in Canada. It isn't even as well known as Reflection Lake which is a half-mile to the right. At this time in our High Lakes Trail trek, we are no longer lost, but in a quandary.

Do we hike down 2,000 feet to Louise Lake and then be seven miles on Stevens Canyon Road to get back to Mt. Rainier's visitor's center, or do we turn around and hope to find the four mile "shortcut" from whence we emerged and which had few trails signs posted? It was over 100° at Rainier!

We decided to backtrack. And then we got really lost. We passed Painter's Lake, and started a steep downhill, passed a moraine field. A pika showed up and "chipped" at us. My wife was startled, and slipped. She screeched, and my one and only opportunity at an image of a pika was gone.

We crossed three dead trees and over a fast moving Paradise River (determined later), and then, from a clearing in the woods came an old woman. She said, "You lost?" "What makes you think that," I asked. And she said, "Because I've lived on this mountain for 70 years, and I still can't tell you what to look for to get out." Turns out she was indeed the oldest resident of the park, having built a cabin with her husband years before this was a national park. She took me by the shoulders, turned me 35° northeast, and said, "Go." Almost four hours later we found the trailhead where we had parked the car.

It was arduous, but gawd, it was pretty. Below is Painter's Alpine Lake and, a little later in March, I'll upload perhaps my favorite view from the trail we were on.

As you can see, I had my usual problems with a high, bright sky, clean air, and too much contrast, but this is pretty much what we saw.

Tags:   Louise Lake Mt. Rainier National Park Stevens Canyon Road Painter's Alpine Lake Our Fourth Trip to Rainier Canon SX40 Copyright Ethan A. Winning Explore

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what it took to get down to its level, or the effort it took to get back up!

Monarch caterpillar on threadneedle milkweed, Mt. Diablo, California almost 10 years ago and I just got home.

Tags:   Monarch caterpillar Mt. Diabo Northern California Canon SX20 Focal length 5mm

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The is the Yellowstone as it courses through the Grand Teton NP. If I were to shoot behind me and to my right, you would see Oxbow Bend (see below), perhaps as famous as the Moulton Barn.

Here are some facts that I just dug up about the Yellowstone from Wikipedia, 74 years since my first visit. I had a friend in my ham radio days who owned one of the largest ranches in Montana. He used to tell us that the northern part of the 100,000 acre ranch bordered on 300 miles (if memory serves) of the Yellowstone River. I was in awe, but I never looked it up. I have pictures that Harold sent, and all you see is river and land. The biggest hill would have been a horse.

"The Yellowstone River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 692 miles (1,114 km) long, in the Western United States. Considered the principal tributary of upper Missouri, this river, via its tributaries, drains a wide area, stretching from the Rocky Mountains in the vicinity of Yellowstone National Park, across the mountains and high plains of southern Montana and northern Wyoming.

The Yellowstone River watershed is a river basin spanning 37,167 square miles (96,260 km2) across Montana, with minor extensions into Wyoming and North Dakota, toward headwaters and terminus, respectively. The Yellowstone Basin watershed contains a system of rivers, including the Yellowstone River, and four tributary basins: the Clarks Fork Yellowstone, Wind River and Bighorn River, Tongue River, and Powder River. These rivers form tributaries to the Missouri River. The mainstem of the Yellowstone River is more than 700 miles (1,100 km) long. At the headwaters, elevations exceed 12,800 feet (3,900 m) above sea level and descends to 1,850 feet (560 m) at the confluence with the Missouri River in North Dakota."

That's some river! As for the image, a tough shot. So much white, so brilliant blue. (I had given up on polaroid filters even before this, but I should have brought one along.) Not a particle of dust in the air. So clear that colors and distances are skewed. The grass is THAT green (or rust); the sky is that blue. Though we have planned other trips to Yellowstone an Rainier, two have been canceled. I'm hoping for at least one more, perhaps to Sequoia where we have the same conditions since it is in the Sierras. Any tips for photography at 8,000 feet would be appreciated...

Tags:   Yellowstone River Yellowstone and Grand Teton NPs approximately 692 miles Tributary Missouri Canon SX50 Copyright Ethan Winning Snake River


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