Fluidr
about   tools   help   Y   Q   a         b   n   l
User / Baz Richardson (away until 10 July) / Sets / Shropshire
Baz Richardson / 288 items

N 100 B 7.0K C 30 E Nov 2, 2016 F Nov 2, 2016
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

We've just returned from a very pleasant four-day trip to Shropshire, during which we paid a visit to Stokesay Castle, which is a few miles north of Ludlow.

This fortified manor house was built in the late 13th century by Laurence of Ludlow, then the leading wool merchant in England, who intended it to form a secure residence and generate income as a commercial estate. Laurence's descendants continued to own the castle until the 16th century, when it passed through various private owners. By the time of the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1641, Stokesay was owned by William Craven, the first Earl of Craven and a supporter of King Charles I. After the Royalist war effort collapsed in 1645, Parliamentary forces besieged the castle in June and quickly forced its garrison to surrender. Parliament ordered the property to be slighted, but only minor damage was done to the walls, allowing Stokesay to continue to be used as a house by the Baldwyn family until the end of the 17th century.

Architecturally, Stokesay Castle is "one of the best-preserved medieval fortified manor houses in England", according to historian Henry Summerson. The castle comprises a walled, moated enclosure, with an entrance way through a 17th-century timber and plaster gatehouse. Inside, the courtyard faces a stone hall and solar block, protected by two stone towers. The hall features a 13th-century wooden-beamed ceiling, and 17th-century carved figures ornament the gatehouse and the solar. The castle was never intended to be a serious military fortification, but its style was intended to echo the much larger castles being built by Edward I in North Wales. The castle has changed very little since the 13th century, and is a rare surviving example of a near complete set of medieval buildings.

Tags:   Shropshire Stokesay Castle castles fortified manor houses Stokesay

N 384 B 11.7K C 89 E Oct 31, 2016 F Nov 2, 2016
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

It was very foggy on the first morning of our trip to Shropshire, and we only managed to escape the fog by driving up Clee Hill, near Ludlow, from our hotel in the valley. This was the view to the west.

Tags:   Shropshire Clee Hill fog landscape Explored

N 5 B 2.5K C 34 E Mar 31, 2013 F Apr 13, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

This large and imposing parish church, St Oswald's, dates from the late 11th century. And whilst most churches have been substantially altered over the years, the history of St Oswald's is more chequered than most. The tower is the oldest part, and is thought to date from around 1085. I suspect some of the stone came from a nearby Roman villa, for within its base can be seen a number of Roman pantiles. The building was heavily damaged in the English Civil War and crudely rebuilt in 1675. It was then substantially altered and restored by G E Street in the 1870s at a cost of £12,650 - a very large sum of money in those days. The church is a Grade II*-listed building.

Tags:   Shropshire Oswestry Welsh Borders Parish Church of St Oswald, Oswestry St Oswald's Church, Oswestry churches parish churches medieval buildings architecture buildings Grade II*-listed buildings

N 6 B 3.0K C 16 E Mar 31, 2013 F Apr 13, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

The Church of St Oswald in Oswestry in the Welsh borders is one of the five widest churches in England, with two side chapels in addition to the main body of the church.

Whilst most churches have been substantially altered over the years, the history of St Oswald's is more chequered than most. The tower is the oldest part, and is thought to date from around 1085. The building was heavily damaged in the English Civil War and crudely rebuilt in 1675. It was then substantially altered and restored by G E Street in the 1870s at a cost of £12,650 - a very large sum of money in those days.



Tags:   Shropshire Oswestry Welsh Borders Parish Church of St Oswald, Oswestry St Oswald's Church, Oswestry churches parish churches medieval buildings architecture buildings

N 22 B 2.0K C 4 E Nov 2, 2016 F Nov 3, 2016
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

During our brief stay in Shropshire we called in at Church Stretton, which is a pretty little town in between Ludlow and Shrewsbury, in the centre of the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Square is on the side of the High Street, in the centre of the town. The Church of St Laurence is mainly Norman, but with Saxon origins.

Tags:   Shropshire Church Stretton market towns street scenes


1.7%