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User / Baz Richardson (away until 10 July) / Sets / Berwick-upon-Tweed
Baz Richardson / 27 items

N 28 B 5.4K C 6 E Oct 18, 2016 F Oct 28, 2016
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Berwick, which is the northernmost town in England, was founded as an Anglo-Saxon settlement during the time of the Kingdom of Northumbria, which was annexed by England in the 10th century. The area was for more than 400 years central to historic border wars between the Kingdoms of England and Scotland, and several times possession of Berwick changed hands between the two kingdoms. The last time it changed hands was when England retook it in 1482. Berwick remains a traditional market town and also has some notable architectural features, in particular its medieval town walls (part of which are seen here), its Elizabethan ramparts and Britain's earliest barracks buildings (1717–21 by Nicholas Hawksmoor for the Board of Ordnance). In the distance, through the arch, can be seen the lighthouse, which dates from 1826.

Tags:   Northumberland Berwick-upon-Tweed town walls lighthouses

N 70 B 4.0K C 32 E Oct 18, 2016 F Oct 28, 2016
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Berwick Pier, which is effectively a breakwater to protect the estuary from dangerous winds and currents, has a history dating back to the 13th century. In 1557 a 300-yard structure was subsequently erected here, but this was all but ruined by 1800. In 1810 work started on a new stone pier, and this was completed by 1821. In total it was 960 yards long. In 1826 work began on the lighthouse under the direction of George Nelson, who designed the Longstone lighthouse on the Farne Islands. The Berwick lighthouse is 44 feet tall and its conical roof consists of a single piece of stone.

The lamp was originally oil-powered and showed a white and a red light visible for about ten miles. It was later converted to gas, then to battery power and finally to mains electricity. The house at the landward end of the pier was home to the keeper, one of several generations of Wilsons, who handed the job down from father to son.

Berwick-upon-Tweed is the northernmost town in England, and is on the east coast.

Tags:   Northumberland Berwick-upon-Tweed, lighthouses Berwick lighthouse Georgian buildings

N 45 B 2.4K C 10 E Oct 18, 2016 F Oct 28, 2016
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Berwick, which is the northernmost town in England, was founded as an Anglo-Saxon settlement during the time of the Kingdom of Northumbria, which was annexed by England in the 10th century. The area was for more than 400 years central to historic border wars between the Kingdoms of England and Scotland, and several times possession of Berwick changed hands between the two kingdoms. The last time it changed hands was when England retook it in 1482. Berwick remains a traditional market town and also has some notable architectural features, in particular its medieval town walls, its Elizabethan ramparts (part of which are seen here), and Britain's earliest barracks buildings (1717–21 by Nicholas Hawksmoor for the Board of Ordnance).

Tags:   Northumberland Berwick-upon-Tweed Elizabethan ramparts defensive walls Tudor architecture

N 28 B 2.7K C 11 E Oct 18, 2016 F Oct 28, 2016
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Marygate is the main street in Berwick-on-Tweed and is dominated by the wonderful Georgian Town Hall that dates from the early 1750s. It is recognised as one of the finest Georgian buildings in the North of England. The spire rises to 153 feet and is the main feature an the skyline of Berwick. Construction is of local sandstone and the total length 132 feet (40 metres). The portico is supported by four massive Tuscan columns, 32 feet high. These form the entrance to the Guild Hall. On the portico is carved the name of William Temple who was Mayor in 1754 when the first part of the building was completed. It was substantially renovated in the mid-19th century.

For more details see: www.freemenofberwick.org.uk/townhall.html

Tags:   Northumberland Berwick-upon-Tweed, Marygate street scenes Berwick Town Hall

N 51 B 2.7K C 8 E Oct 18, 2016 F Nov 20, 2016
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During our recent week's visit to south-east Scotland we called in at Berwick-upon-Tweed, which is just over the English border. Berwick is a traditional market town and also has some notable architectural features, in particular its medieval town walls, its Elizabethan ramparts and these early 18th century barracks.

Built between 1717 and 1721 to the design of the distinguished architect Nicholas Hawksmoor, the barracks were designed to protect the town during the Jacobite risings. The work involved two parallel blocks of military accommodation. An additional block was added between 1739 and 1741. After the Napoleonic Wars the barracks were abandoned but put back into use in the 1850s.

The barracks eventually became the depot of the King's Own Scottish Borderers, who arrived from Fulford Barracks in July 1881. The regiment moved out of these barracks in 1963 and they are now maintained by English Heritage.

Berwick-upon-Tweed is the northernmost town in England and is located a couple of miles south of the Scottish border at the mouth of the River Tweed on the east coast. Berwick was founded as an Anglo-Saxon settlement during the time of the Kingdom of Northumbria, which was annexed by England in the 10th century. The area was for more than 400 years central to historic border wars between the Kingdoms of England and Scotland, and several times possession of Berwick changed hands between the two kingdoms. The last time it changed hands was when England retook it in 1482.

Tags:   Berwick-upon-Tweed Berwick Barracks 18th century architecture Georgian buildings Nicholas Hawksmoor Northumberland


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