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User / Baz Richardson (away until 10 July) / Sets / Wells Cathedral
Baz Richardson / 11 items

N 46 B 11.7K C 21 E Sep 7, 2015 F Sep 13, 2015
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Wells Cathedral in Somerset is dedicated to St Andrew the Apostle, and is the seat of the Bishop of Bath and Wells. The present building dates from 1175 to 1490, an earlier church having been built on the site in 705. It is moderately sized among the medieval cathedrals of England, falling between those of massive proportions, such as Lincoln and York, and the much smaller cathedrals of Oxford and Carlisle. With its broad west front and large central tower, it is the dominant feature of its small cathedral city and a landmark in the Somerset countryside. Wells has been variously described as "unquestionably one of the most beautiful" and as "the most poetic" of English cathedrals.

The architecture of the cathedral presents a harmonious whole which is entirely Gothic and mostly in a single style, the Early English Gothic of the late 12th and early 13th centuries. In this Wells differs from most other English medieval cathedrals, which have parts in the earlier Romanesque architectural style introduced to Britain by the Normans in the 11th century. The historian John Harvey considers this to be the first truly Gothic structure in Europe, having broken from the last constraints of Romanesque.

The stonework of its pointed arcades and fluted piers is enriched by the complexity of the pronounced mouldings and vitality of the carved capitals in a foliate style known as "stiff leaf". The exterior has an Early English façade displaying more than three hundred sculpted figures, and the eastern end retains much ancient stained glass, which is rare in England.

Unlike the many English cathedrals of monastic foundation, Wells has an exceptional number of surviving secular buildings associated with its chapter of secular canons, such as the Bishop's Palace and the Vicars' Close, a residential street which has remained intact from the 15th century. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building.

Source: Wikipedia.

Tags:   Somerset Wells Wells Cathedral cathedrals

N 15 B 2.5K C 2 E Sep 7, 2015 F Sep 13, 2015
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Wells Cathedral in Somerset is dedicated to St Andrew the Apostle, and is the seat of the Bishop of Bath and Wells. The present building dates from 1175 to 1490, an earlier church having been built on the site in 705. It is moderately sized among the medieval cathedrals of England, falling between those of massive proportions, such as Lincoln and York, and the much smaller cathedrals of Oxford and Carlisle. With its broad west front and large central tower, it is the dominant feature of its small cathedral city and a landmark in the Somerset countryside. Wells has been variously described as "unquestionably one of the most beautiful" and as "the most poetic" of English cathedrals.

Wells is the smallest of England's cathedral cities and attracts numerous visitors, some of whom are enjoying refreshments on the Swan Terrace which overlooks the cathedral green.

Tags:   Somerset Wells Wells Cathedral cathedrals

N 58 B 3.5K C 27 E Sep 7, 2015 F Sep 13, 2015
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Reached via a medieval gateway on the south side of Wells Cathedral, these buildings in two opposite and virtually identical rows were the residences of the "Vicars Choral", who have sung in the cathedral since about 1140. In 1348 they were incorporated as a College of Vicars and the houses themselves were completed by 1363. The chimneys were raised and crowned in about 1470. The original windows were replaced in the Georgian era. The buildings are Grade I-listed. According to English Heritage, this is an outstanding early planned street, in which the overall form of the buildings remains substantially unchanged.

Tags:   Somerset Wells Vicars Close Grade I-listed buildings medieval residences 14th century architecture Wells Cathedral

N 119 B 5.6K C 58 E Sep 7, 2015 F Sep 13, 2015
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The spectacular Bishop's Palace at Wells in Somerset could easily be mistaken for a medieval castle. In fact, it virtually became that. The palace is adjacent to Wells Cathedral and has been the home of the Bishops of the Diocese of Bath and Wells for 800 years.

The Bishop’s Palace dates from the early-thirteenth century when Bishop Jocelin Trotman, the first Bishop to hold the title Bishop of Bath and Wells, received a crown licence to build a residence and deer park on land to the south of the Cathedral of St Andrew. But in the 14th century a successor, Bishop Ralph of Shrewsbury, had an uneasy relationship with the citizens of Wells partly because of his imposition of taxes, and obviously felt at risk. He decided to surround his palace with crenellated walls, a moat filled by local springs, and a drawbridge. Parts of the buildings are still used by the current bishop, although the palace is mainly used for public functions and as a tourist attraction.


Tags:   Somerset Wells Bishop's Palace, Wells palaces moats castles 13th century architecture medieval buildings

N 26 B 2.6K C 5 E Sep 7, 2015 F Sep 14, 2015
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The Penniless Porch in Wells in Somerset is an entrance gateway into a walled precinct, the Liberty of St Andrew, which encloses the twelfth century Wells Cathedral, the Bishop's Palace, Vicar's Close and the residences of the clergy who serve the cathedral.

One of three ancient gateways leading to the Cathedral Green, the Penniless Porch was built around 1450, by Bishop Thomas Beckington and bears his rebus or badge on the cathedral side. It forms one of a pair with The Bishop's Eye which formed the gateway into the Bishop's palace from the market place. It was named for the beggars who plied their trade there. It is a three-storey building of Doulting ashlar stone, with a lead roof and has been designated as a Grade I-listed building.

Tags:   Somerset Wells Wells Cathedral Penniless Porch medieval buildings 15th century architecture cathedral gates


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