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User / Baz Richardson (away until 10 July) / Sets / Buckinghamshire
Baz Richardson / 106 items

N 8 B 5.4K C 10 E Jun 24, 2014 F Jun 25, 2014
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The 14th century Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul stands on the banks of the River Great Ouse at Olney in north Buckinghamshire. Its spire dominates the southern approach to the town. The church is where slave trader turned abolitionist John Newton – author of the hymn Amazing Grace – served as curate from 1764 to 1779. There is a stained glass image of him at the church, as well as a representation of his ship in storm during which he converted to Christianity. The top of the famous spire at St.Peter and St.Paul has a weather cock inscribed:
"I never crow but stand to show whence winds do blow. 1829".The top of the spire was restored in 1884 and is a different colour. The spire reaches a height of 185 feet [56.5 m].

The church has a slightly unusual appearance due to the fact that the roof of the nave is lower than the roof of the chancel, and of slate rather than tile. This is because the nave was altered in 1807, when the clerestory was demolished and the old roof timbers and lead were sold. The north aisle was partly rebuilt in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the south aisle was largely rebuilt in 1831. The windows in both aisles display the flowing tracery characteristic of fourteenth century ecclesiastical architecture, although they were much restored, and in some cases replaced, in the nineteenth century.

Tags:   Buckinghamshire Olney Church of St Peter & St Paul, Olney churches church spires 14th century church buildings medieval buildings

N 4 B 2.1K C 6 E Jun 24, 2014 F Jun 25, 2014
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The 14th century Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul stands on the banks of the River Great Ouse at Olney in north Buckinghamshire. The tower has a very fine Northamptonshire-style broach spire which has four sets of lucarnes and dates from the late 14th century. The octagonal pinnacles at the base of the spire are thought to be 17th century.

The church is where slave trader turned abolitionist John Newton – author of the hymn Amazing Grace – served as curate from 1764 to 1779. There is a stained glass image of him at the church, as well as a representation of his ship in storm during which he converted to Christianity. The top of the famous spire at St.Peter and St.Paul has a weather cock inscribed: "I never crow but stand to show whence winds do blow. 1829". The top of the spire was restored in 1884 and is a different colour. The spire reaches a height of 185 feet [56.5 m].


Tags:   Buckinghamshire Olney Church of St Peter & St Paul, Olney churches church spires church interiors

N 18 B 6.6K C 13 E Jun 24, 2014 F Jun 25, 2014
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The 14th century Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul stands on the banks of the River Great Ouse at Olney in north Buckinghamshire. The church is where slave trader turned abolitionist John Newton – author of the hymn Amazing Grace – served as curate from 1764 to 1779. There is a stained glass image of him at the church, as well as a representation of his ship in storm during which he converted to Christianity.


The church has a slightly unusual appearance due to the fact that the roof of the nave is lower than the roof of the chancel, and of slate rather than tile. This is because the nave was altered in 1807, when the clerestory was demolished and the old roof timbers and lead were sold. The north aisle was partly rebuilt in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the south aisle was largely rebuilt in 1831. The windows in both aisles display the flowing tracery characteristic of fourteenth century ecclesiastical architecture, although they were much restored, and in some cases replaced, in the nineteenth century.

Tags:   Buckinghamshire Olney Church of St Peter & St Paul, Olney churches church spires church interiors hand-held HDR

N 3 B 1.6K C 4 E Jun 24, 2014 F Jun 25, 2014
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The 14th century Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul stands on the banks of the River Great Ouse at Olney in north Buckinghamshire. The church is where slave trader turned abolitionist John Newton – author of the hymn Amazing Grace – served as curate from 1764 to 1779. There is a stained glass image of him at the church, as well as a representation of his ship in storm during which he converted to Christianity.

Tags:   Buckinghamshire Olney Church of St Peter & St Paul, Olney churches church spires church interiors

N 5 B 1.5K C 7 E Mar 30, 2014 F Apr 4, 2014
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The New Inn at Stowe was built by Lord Cobham in 1717-1721. In the 18th century it accommodated wealthy visitors to the beautiful landscaped gardens, and – typically – combined a working farm as part of the inn complex. By the mid-19th century the aristocratic and gentry visitors had gone, and the inn became a social focus for local farmers. In 1856 it ceased to be an inn and retreated to a domestic accommodation and farming role. It is now managed by the National Trust, and several of the rooms are open to the public. A new extension forms the entrance to Stowe Landscape Gardens.

Tags:   Buckinghamshire Stowe Landscape Gardens New Inn New Inn, Stowe National Trust inns National Trust interiors


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