Fluidr
about   tools   help   Y   Q   a         b   n   l
User / Baz Richardson (away until 10 July) / Sets / Norwich Cathedral & city
Baz Richardson / 41 items

N 12 B 8.7K C 18 E May 16, 2013 F May 23, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Norwich Cathedral in Norfolk is surrounded by houses, many of which were built in the 18th century to house the cathedral's staff. It means you cannot get a clear view of the whole of the building.

It is one of our grand Norman cathedrals, and dedicated to the Holy and Undivided Trinity. It was begun in 1096 and constructed out of flint and mortar and faced with a cream coloured Caen limestone. A Saxon settlement and two churches were demolished to make room for the buildings.

The cathedral was completed in 1145 with the Norman tower topped with a wooden spire covered with lead. The Norman spire was blown down in 1362. Its fall caused considerable damage to the east end, as a result of which the clerestory of the choir was rebuilt in the Perpendicular style. Several episodes of damage necessitated rebuilding of the east end and spire but since the final erection of the 315 feet-tall stone spire in 1480 there have been few fundamental alterations to the fabric. After Salisbury it is the second tallest spire in England.

In the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the cathedral's flat timber ceilings were replaced with stone vaults. The vaulting was carried out in a spectacular manner with hundreds of ornately-carved, painted and gilded bosses. The bosses of the vault number over 1,000. Each is decorated with a theological image, and as a group they have been described as without parallel in the Christian world. The nave vault shows the history of the world from the creation; the cloister includes series showing the life of Christ and the Apocalypse. The large cloister (the second largest in England) has over 1,000 bosses including several hundred carved and ornately painted ones.

Tags:   Norfolk Norwich Norwich Cathedral Norman architecture cathedrals spires

N 30 B 11.2K C 69 E May 16, 2013 F May 23, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

The cloisters at Norwich Cathedral are the second largest in England after those at Salisbury. There are over 1,000 ceiling bosses including several hundred carved and ornately painted ones.

Norwich Cathedral in Norfolk is one of our grand Norman cathedrals, and dedicated to the Holy and Undivided Trinity. It was begun in 1096 and constructed out of flint and mortar and faced with a cream coloured Caen limestone. A Saxon settlement and two churches were demolished to make room for the buildings.

The cathedral was completed in 1145 with the Norman tower topped with a wooden spire covered with lead. The Norman spire was blown down in 1362. Its fall caused considerable damage to the east end, as a result of which the clerestory of the choir was rebuilt in the Perpendicular style. Several episodes of damage necessitated rebuilding of the east end and spire but since the final erection of the 315 feet-tall stone spire in 1480 there have been few fundamental alterations to the fabric. After Salisbury it is the second tallest spire in England.

In the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the cathedral's flat timber ceilings were replaced with stone vaults. The vaulting was carried out in a spectacular manner with hundreds of ornately-carved, painted and gilded bosses. The bosses of the vault number over 1,000. Each is decorated with a theological image, and as a group they have been described as without parallel in the Christian world. The nave vault shows the history of the world from the creation; the cloister includes series showing the life of Christ and the Apocalypse.

Tags:   Norfolk Norwich Norwich Cathedral Norman architecture cathedrals cloisters

N 4 B 2.6K C 0 E May 16, 2013 F May 23, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

The Jesus Chapel in Norwich Cathedral is one of four chapels in the Ambulatory at the east end of the cathedral. It features a 1510 painting of the Wise Men visiting the infant Jesus.

Norwich Cathedral in Norfolk is one of our grand Norman cathedrals, and dedicated to the Holy and Undivided Trinity. It was begun in 1096 and constructed out of flint and mortar and faced with a cream coloured Caen limestone. A Saxon settlement and two churches were demolished to make room for the buildings.

The cathedral was completed in 1145 with the Norman tower topped with a wooden spire covered with lead. The Norman spire was blown down in 1362. Its fall caused considerable damage to the east end, as a result of which the clerestory of the choir was rebuilt in the Perpendicular style. Several episodes of damage necessitated rebuilding of the east end and spire but since the final erection of the 315 feet-tall stone spire in 1480 there have been few fundamental alterations to the fabric. After Salisbury it is the second tallest spire in England.

In the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the cathedral's flat timber ceilings were replaced with stone vaults. The vaulting was carried out in a spectacular manner with hundreds of ornately-carved, painted and gilded bosses. The bosses of the vault number over 1,000. Each is decorated with a theological image, and as a group they have been described as without parallel in the Christian world. The nave vault shows the history of the world from the creation; the cloister includes series showing the life of Christ and the Apocalypse. The large cloister (the second largest in England) has over 1,000 bosses including several hundred carved and ornately painted ones.

Tags:   Norfolk Norwich Norwich Cathedral Jesus Chapel cathedrals chapels Norman architecture medieval paintings

N 5 B 3.2K C 2 E May 16, 2013 F May 23, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

The stained glass windows in our churches and cathedrals invariably date from the 19th and 20th centuries, as the medieval glass windows were virtually all destroyed in the 16th and 17th centuries, either during the reformation or subsequently during Cromwell's tenure.

Norwich Cathedral in Norfolk is one of our grand Norman cathedrals, and dedicated to the Holy and Undivided Trinity. It was begun in 1096 and constructed out of flint and mortar and faced with a cream coloured Caen limestone. A Saxon settlement and two churches were demolished to make room for the buildings.

The cathedral was completed in 1145 with the Norman tower topped with a wooden spire covered with lead. The Norman spire was blown down in 1362. Its fall caused considerable damage to the east end, as a result of which the clerestory of the choir was rebuilt in the Perpendicular style. Several episodes of damage necessitated rebuilding of the east end and spire but since the final erection of the 315 feet-tall stone spire in 1480 there have been few fundamental alterations to the fabric. After Salisbury it is the second tallest spire in England.

In the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the cathedral's flat timber ceilings were replaced with stone vaults. The vaulting was carried out in a spectacular manner with hundreds of ornately-carved, painted and gilded bosses. The bosses of the vault number over 1,000. Each is decorated with a theological image, and as a group they have been described as without parallel in the Christian world. The nave vault shows the history of the world from the creation; the cloister includes series showing the life of Christ and the Apocalypse. The large cloister (the second largest in England) has over 1,000 bosses including several hundred carved and ornately painted ones.

Tags:   Norfolk Norwich Norwich Cathedral Norman architecture stained glass windows West window

N 6 B 2.6K C 8 E May 16, 2013 F May 23, 2013
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

The stained glass windows in our churches and cathedrals invariably date from the 19th and 20th centuries, as the medieval glass windows were virtually all destroyed in the 16th and 17th centuries, either during the reformation or subsequently during Cromwell's tenure.

Norwich Cathedral in Norfolk is one of our grand Norman cathedrals, and dedicated to the Holy and Undivided Trinity. It was begun in 1096 and constructed out of flint and mortar and faced with a cream coloured Caen limestone. A Saxon settlement and two churches were demolished to make room for the buildings.

The cathedral was completed in 1145 with the Norman tower topped with a wooden spire covered with lead. The Norman spire was blown down in 1362. Its fall caused considerable damage to the east end, as a result of which the clerestory of the choir was rebuilt in the Perpendicular style. Several episodes of damage necessitated rebuilding of the east end and spire but since the final erection of the 315 feet-tall stone spire in 1480 there have been few fundamental alterations to the fabric. After Salisbury it is the second tallest spire in England.

In the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the cathedral's flat timber ceilings were replaced with stone vaults. The vaulting was carried out in a spectacular manner with hundreds of ornately-carved, painted and gilded bosses. The bosses of the vault number over 1,000. Each is decorated with a theological image, and as a group they have been described as without parallel in the Christian world. The nave vault shows the history of the world from the creation; the cloister includes series showing the life of Christ and the Apocalypse. The large cloister (the second largest in England) has over 1,000 bosses including several hundred carved and ornately painted ones.

Tags:   Norfolk Norwich Norwich Cathedral Norman architecture East Window stained glass windows


12.2%