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User / Baz Richardson (away until 10 July)
Baz Richardson / 10,532 items

N 36 B 783 C 21 E May 18, 2022 F Jun 19, 2022
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So many pebbled beaches simply look grey from a distance, but when you look at them closely, especially when they have recently been washed by the tide, there is often a remarkable range of colours to be seen. This was taken on the beach at Seaton on the south-east Cornish coast.

This will be my last posting for around three weeks, as we are heading up to the far north-west of England and the Cumbria and North Lancashire border. It's an area I know reasonably well, and we shall be well-placed to cover both the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales. We can only hope for decent weather.

In the meantime can I say a big thank you to everyone who takes the time to visit my photostream, and especially to those who write a few words. I very much appreciate your visits. I shall try and catch up with you all when we return.

Tags:   Cornwall Seaton beaches pebbles geology

N 41 B 891 C 18 E May 17, 2022 F Jun 19, 2022
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Looe Island is about a quarter of a mile off Hannafore Beach at the coastal resort of Looe in south-east Cornwall. The sea around the island, which is a nature sanctuary and belongs to the Cornwall Wildlife Trust, contains a lot of marine life. There are several glass-bottomed boats based in Looe which bring visitors out to enjoy the sights.

Some scholars suggest the island could be Ictis, the location described by Diodorus Siculus as a centre for the tin trade in pre-Roman Britain. There is a local legend that Joseph of Arimathea, a rich merchant who traded in tin, brought the young Jesus of Nazareth here on one of his business trips. There are of course other legends linking Joseph of Arimathea with the West Country.

Tags:   Cornwall Looe West Looe Hannafore coast beaches Looe Island

N 40 B 835 C 13 E May 15, 2022 F Jun 19, 2022
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Tintagel Castle in Cornwall has provided a substantial income from tourists to the area for many years due to the Arthurian legend. Many myths and legends turn out to have some truth in them, but I think the one thing we can be sure of is that King Arthur certainly had nothing to do with Tintagel Castle, the remnants of which are here, on the north coast of Cornwall.

Arthur - if he existed - would surely have lived in the Dark Ages, after the Roman Empire had started to fall apart, while Tintagel Castle wasn't built until the 13th century, some 600 or more years later. However, there are indications of a very early settlement at Tintagel (with links to the Mediterranean) and various archaeological finds have been made. For details please see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintagel_Castle.

The castle, of which very little now remains, stretches across from the mainland to "The Island" - the peninsula just left of centre, and is now connected by a footbridge. This is all owned by Prince Charles as part of the estate of the Duchy of Cornwall, and it is managed by English Heritage.

Tags:   Cornwall Tintagel North Cornwall coast cliffs The Island, Tintagel

N 39 B 915 C 11 E May 12, 2022 F Jun 19, 2022
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Altarnun must be one of the prettiest rural villages in the whole of Cornwall. A Norman church was built here in the 12th century, but the present church was built on the same site in the 15th century from unquarried stone from Bodmin Moor. The church is dedicated to St Nonna, mother of St David, who lived in the sixth century. A Celtic cross from the time of St Nonna is located by the church gate.

As the largest parish church on Bodmin Moor, the Grade I-listed church is known as the Cathedral of the Moor. It is thought that construction of the tower may have commenced in the late 1300s, but most of the current church was built largely in the next century in the Perpendicular style, with its bell tower standing 109 ft high. Simon Jenkins considers this to be one of England's Thousand Best Churches.

The stream which flows through Altarnun is known as Penpont Water and eventually joins the River Tamar. The narrow little medieval pack horse bridge (on the left) dates from the 15th century. The cottages beyond the bridge are both Grade II-listed and are thought to date from the late 1600s.


Tags:   Cornwall Bodmin Moor Altarnun villages churches cottages

N 46 B 828 C 15 E May 11, 2022 F Jun 19, 2022
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Seen from the garden terrace, Antony House near Torpoint in south-east Cornwall was constructed for Sir William Carew between 1711 and 1721 and is believed to be one of the finest surviving Queen Anne buildings in the West Country. The house features some exceptional furnishings. There is a splendid collection of portraits including examples of works by Reynolds and a painting of Charles I at his trial. There are 25 acres of landscaped gardens adjacent to the house, and some 50 acres of natural woodland. The house and gardens were donated to the National Trust in 1961, although the house is still the home of the Carew Pole family.

For other pictures of this beautiful house and its grounds please see my Antony House album.

Tags:   Cornwall Antony House Grade I-listed buildings National Trust architecture Queen Anne period


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