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User / annkelliott
Anne Elliott / 19,877 items

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I believe the Status of this species is 'Threatened.'

Posting these five photos just before and just after midnight, in case I actually manage to get up earlier than usual tomorrow, to go for a drive.

13 July 2020: our temperature this morning is 14C (windchill 13C). Sunrise is at 5:37 am and sunset is at 9:45 pm. The Severe Thunderstorm Watch has been lifted.

On 9 July 2020, it turned out to be such a great day, with some much-appreciated sightings. I must have spent about 10 hours driving and almost every inch of my body ached like crazy at the end of it. Total distance driven was 458 km, leaving home at 8:15 am and arriving back home 12 and a half hours later, at 8:45 pm. Now, each summer, I try and do two or three longer (for me) drives, to make sure I don't lose the courage to do this. I think it took me about 6 and a half hours to get to my destination, as I kept seeing things to stop and photograph. Each time I stopped, I held my breath in case the car didn't start, but, thankfully, all went well.

Weather-wise, it was a beautiful, sunny day and not unbearably hot. Unlike when I did this drive in August 2018, there was no smoke from any wildfires, thank goodness.

I didn't see as many Hawks this time, unlike last year, but I was thrilled to see a Ferruginous Hawk and a Swainson's Hawk, with a second Swainson's closer to home. No Golden Eagle this time.

Five Common Nighthawks also helped make my day. For several years, I had longed to see one of these unusual birds up close and, finally in 2017, I managed to find four of them. In 2018, I was able to find just one and in 2019 I found two. A few years ago, I had seen them in flight or high up in a tree several times, but never close. These birds are 9½ inches from the tip of bill to the tip of tail. Very strange looking birds, and always such a thrill to see one.

My actual destination on 9 July 2020 was the Alberta Birds of Prey Centre, near Lethbridge. I know some people feel that photographing birds that are not out in the wild is cheating. I kind of agree, though I think it's fine as long as someone says where a photo was taken - wild or in captivity..

This Centre is a wonderful place that rehabilitates and releases (whenever possible) various birds of prey - hawks, owls, Bald Eagles, Turkey Vultures, and Golden Eagles. Some of these birds act as Wildlife Ambassadors, too, including educating the public away from the Centre. Sometimes, a bird is used as a foster parent, too. This year, great precautions were being taken in order to keep staff and visitors safe, so hand sanitizer and masks were available. There were only a few people when I was there and I only needed to wear the mask inside the gift store and when I held a tiny Burrowing Owl. Poor little thing, it sat on my gloved arm and stared at me. Maybe it wondered why it could only see my eyes and not the rest of my face. Because it had taken me so long to drive south, I didn't have too much time at the Centre, but long enough to photograph the Eagles and Owls.

I love the changing scenery as one drives south, and my drive was timed perfectly to catch the golden Canola fields. In 2019, maybe half way, I pulled over to take a few photos of an old barn and there was a truck just pulling away. I thought the guy might have been taking photos, too. We got talking and one of the things we both said was that we had never seen a blue field of Flax. Later in my drive, guess what I found : ) Looked beautiful, with blue on one side of the road and a field of yellow Canola on the opposite side. This year, I found Flax in a couple of places.

This was definitely a rewarding - and exhausting - day, full of sightings of all kinds. My favourite kind of day! Just wish my daughter could come with me on a long trip or two, but people are still not supposed to travel together in the same vehicle, because you can't keep 6 or more feet away from each other, even if one person sits in the back. I prefer to know that I continue to abide by the restrictions - means consideration towards other people.

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

Posting these five photos just before and just after midnight, in case I actually manage to get up earlier than usual tomorrow, to go for a drive.

13 July 2020: our temperature this morning is 14C (windchill 13C). Sunrise is at 5:37 am and sunset is at 9:45 pm. The Severe Thunderstorm Watch has been lifted.

On 9 July 2020, it turned out to be such a great day, with some much-appreciated sightings. I must have spent about 10 hours driving and almost every inch of my body ached like crazy at the end of it. Total distance driven was 458 km, leaving home at 8:15 am and arriving back home 12 and a half hours later, at 8:45 pm. Now, each summer, I try and do two or three longer (for me) drives, to make sure I don't lose the courage to do this. I think it took me about 6 and a half hours to get to my destination, as I kept seeing things to stop and photograph. Each time I stopped, I held my breath in case the car didn't start, but, thankfully, all went well.

Weather-wise, it was a beautiful, sunny day and not unbearably hot. Unlike when I did this drive in August 2018, there was no smoke from any wildfires, thank goodness.

I didn't see as many Hawks this time, unlike last year, but I was thrilled to see a Ferruginous Hawk and a Swainson's Hawk, with a second Swainson's closer to home. No Golden Eagle this time.

Five Common Nighthawks also helped make my day. For several years, I had longed to see one of these unusual birds up close and, finally in 2017, I managed to find four of them. In 2018, I was able to find just one and in 2019 I found two. A few years ago, I had seen them in flight or high up in a tree several times, but never close. These birds are 9½ inches from the tip of bill to the tip of tail. Very strange looking birds, and always such a thrill to see one.

My actual destination on 9 July 2020 was the Alberta Birds of Prey Centre, near Lethbridge. I know some people feel that photographing birds that are not out in the wild is cheating. I kind of agree, though I think it's fine as long as someone says where a photo was taken - wild or in captivity..

This Centre is a wonderful place that rehabilitates and releases (whenever possible) various birds of prey - hawks, owls, Bald Eagles, Turkey Vultures, and Golden Eagles. Some of these birds act as Wildlife Ambassadors, too, including educating the public away from the Centre. Sometimes, a bird is used as a foster parent, too. This year, great precautions were being taken in order to keep staff and visitors safe, so hand sanitizer and masks were available. There were only a few people when I was there and I only needed to wear the mask inside the gift store and when I held a tiny Burrowing Owl. Poor little thing, it sat on my gloved arm and stared at me. Maybe it wondered why it could only see my eyes and not the rest of my face. Because it had taken me so long to drive south, I didn't have too much time at the Centre, but long enough to photograph the Eagles and Owls.

I love the changing scenery as one drives south, and my drive was timed perfectly to catch the golden Canola fields. In 2019, maybe half way, I pulled over to take a few photos of an old barn and there was a truck just pulling away. I thought the guy might have been taking photos, too. We got talking and one of the things we both said was that we had never seen a blue field of Flax. Later in my drive, guess what I found : ) Looked beautiful, with blue on one side of the road and a field of yellow Canola on the opposite side. This year, I found Flax in a couple of places.

This was definitely a rewarding - and exhausting - day, full of sightings of all kinds. My favourite kind of day! Just wish my daughter could come with me on a long trip or two, but people are still not supposed to travel together in the same vehicle, because you can't keep 6 or more feet away from each other, even if one person sits in the back. I prefer to know that I continue to abide by the restrictions - means consideration towards other people.

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

Posting these five photos just before and just after midnight, in case I actually manage to get up earlier than usual tomorrow, to go for a drive.

13 July 2020: our temperature this morning is 14C (windchill 13C). Sunrise is at 5:37 am and sunset is at 9:45 pm. The Severe Thunderstorm Watch has been lifted.

On 9 July 2020, it turned out to be such a great day, with some much-appreciated sightings. I must have spent about 10 hours driving and almost every inch of my body ached like crazy at the end of it. Total distance driven was 458 km, leaving home at 8:15 am and arriving back home 12 and a half hours later, at 8:45 pm. Now, each summer, I try and do two or three longer (for me) drives, to make sure I don't lose the courage to do this. I think it took me about 6 and a half hours to get to my destination, as I kept seeing things to stop and photograph. Each time I stopped, I held my breath in case the car didn't start, but, thankfully, all went well.

Weather-wise, it was a beautiful, sunny day and not unbearably hot. Unlike when I did this drive in August 2018, there was no smoke from any wildfires, thank goodness.

I didn't see as many Hawks this time, unlike last year, but I was thrilled to see a Ferruginous Hawk and a Swainson's Hawk, with a second Swainson's closer to home. No Golden Eagle this time.

Five Common Nighthawks also helped make my day. For several years, I had longed to see one of these unusual birds up close and, finally in 2017, I managed to find four of them. In 2018, I was able to find just one and in 2019 I found two. A few years ago, I had seen them in flight or high up in a tree several times, but never close. These birds are 9½ inches from the tip of bill to the tip of tail. Very strange looking birds, and always such a thrill to see one.

My actual destination on 9 July 2020 was the Alberta Birds of Prey Centre, near Lethbridge. I know some people feel that photographing birds that are not out in the wild is cheating. I kind of agree, though I think it's fine as long as someone says where a photo was taken - wild or in captivity..

This Centre is a wonderful place that rehabilitates and releases (whenever possible) various birds of prey - hawks, owls, Bald Eagles, Turkey Vultures, and Golden Eagles. Some of these birds act as Wildlife Ambassadors, too, including educating the public away from the Centre. Sometimes, a bird is used as a foster parent, too. This year, great precautions were being taken in order to keep staff and visitors safe, so hand sanitizer and masks were available. There were only a few people when I was there and I only needed to wear the mask inside the gift store and when I held a tiny Burrowing Owl. Poor little thing, it sat on my gloved arm and stared at me. Maybe it wondered why it could only see my eyes and not the rest of my face. Because it had taken me so long to drive south, I didn't have too much time at the Centre, but long enough to photograph the Eagles and Owls.

I love the changing scenery as one drives south, and my drive was timed perfectly to catch the golden Canola fields. In 2019, maybe half way, I pulled over to take a few photos of an old barn and there was a truck just pulling away. I thought the guy might have been taking photos, too. We got talking and one of the things we both said was that we had never seen a blue field of Flax. Later in my drive, guess what I found : ) Looked beautiful, with blue on one side of the road and a field of yellow Canola on the opposite side. This year, I found Flax in a couple of places.

This was definitely a rewarding - and exhausting - day, full of sightings of all kinds. My favourite kind of day! Just wish my daughter could come with me on a long trip or two, but people are still not supposed to travel together in the same vehicle, because you can't keep 6 or more feet away from each other, even if one person sits in the back. I prefer to know that I continue to abide by the restrictions - means consideration towards other people.

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

Posting these five photos just before and just after midnight, in case I actually manage to get up earlier than usual tomorrow, to go for a drive.

13 July 2020: our temperature this morning is 14C (windchill 13C). Sunrise is at 5:37 am and sunset is at 9:45 pm. The Severe Thunderstorm Watch has been lifted.

On 9 July 2020, it turned out to be such a great day, with some much-appreciated sightings. I must have spent about 10 hours driving and almost every inch of my body ached like crazy at the end of it. Total distance driven was 458 km, leaving home at 8:15 am and arriving back home 12 and a half hours later, at 8:45 pm. Now, each summer, I try and do two or three longer (for me) drives, to make sure I don't lose the courage to do this. I think it took me about 6 and a half hours to get to my destination, as I kept seeing things to stop and photograph. Each time I stopped, I held my breath in case the car didn't start, but, thankfully, all went well.

Weather-wise, it was a beautiful, sunny day and not unbearably hot. Unlike when I did this drive in August 2018, there was no smoke from any wildfires, thank goodness.

I didn't see as many Hawks this time, unlike last year, but I was thrilled to see a Ferruginous Hawk and a Swainson's Hawk, with a second Swainson's closer to home. No Golden Eagle this time.

Five Common Nighthawks also helped make my day. For several years, I had longed to see one of these unusual birds up close and, finally in 2017, I managed to find four of them. In 2018, I was able to find just one and in 2019 I found two. A few years ago, I had seen them in flight or high up in a tree several times, but never close. These birds are 9½ inches from the tip of bill to the tip of tail. Very strange looking birds, and always such a thrill to see one.

My actual destination on 9 July 2020 was the Alberta Birds of Prey Centre, near Lethbridge. I know some people feel that photographing birds that are not out in the wild is cheating. I kind of agree, though I think it's fine as long as someone says where a photo was taken - wild or in captivity..

This Centre is a wonderful place that rehabilitates and releases (whenever possible) various birds of prey - hawks, owls, Bald Eagles, Turkey Vultures, and Golden Eagles. Some of these birds act as Wildlife Ambassadors, too, including educating the public away from the Centre. Sometimes, a bird is used as a foster parent, too. This year, great precautions were being taken in order to keep staff and visitors safe, so hand sanitizer and masks were available. There were only a few people when I was there and I only needed to wear the mask inside the gift store and when I held a tiny Burrowing Owl. Poor little thing, it sat on my gloved arm and stared at me. Maybe it wondered why it could only see my eyes and not the rest of my face. Because it had taken me so long to drive south, I didn't have too much time at the Centre, but long enough to photograph the Eagles and Owls.

I love the changing scenery as one drives south, and my drive was timed perfectly to catch the golden Canola fields. In 2019, maybe half way, I pulled over to take a few photos of an old barn and there was a truck just pulling away. I thought the guy might have been taking photos, too. We got talking and one of the things we both said was that we had never seen a blue field of Flax. Later in my drive, guess what I found : ) Looked beautiful, with blue on one side of the road and a field of yellow Canola on the opposite side. This year, I found Flax in a couple of places.

This was definitely a rewarding - and exhausting - day, full of sightings of all kinds. My favourite kind of day! Just wish my daughter could come with me on a long trip or two, but people are still not supposed to travel together in the same vehicle, because you can't keep 6 or more feet away from each other, even if one person sits in the back. I prefer to know that I continue to abide by the restrictions - means consideration towards other people.

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

Posting these five photos just before and just after midnight, in case I actually manage to get up earlier than usual tomorrow, to go for a drive.

13 July 2020: our temperature this morning is 14C (windchill 13C). Sunrise is at 5:37 am and sunset is at 9:45 pm. The Severe Thunderstorm Watch has been lifted.

On 9 July 2020, it turned out to be such a great day, with some much-appreciated sightings. I must have spent about 10 hours driving and almost every inch of my body ached like crazy at the end of it. Total distance driven was 458 km, leaving home at 8:15 am and arriving back home 12 and a half hours later, at 8:45 pm. Now, each summer, I try and do two or three longer (for me) drives, to make sure I don't lose the courage to do this. I think it took me about 6 and a half hours to get to my destination, as I kept seeing things to stop and photograph. Each time I stopped, I held my breath in case the car didn't start, but, thankfully, all went well.

Weather-wise, it was a beautiful, sunny day and not unbearably hot. Unlike when I did this drive in August 2018, there was no smoke from any wildfires, thank goodness.

I didn't see as many Hawks this time, unlike last year, but I was thrilled to see a Ferruginous Hawk and a Swainson's Hawk, with a second Swainson's closer to home. No Golden Eagle this time.

Five Common Nighthawks also helped make my day. For several years, I had longed to see one of these unusual birds up close and, finally in 2017, I managed to find four of them. In 2018, I was able to find just one and in 2019 I found two. A few years ago, I had seen them in flight or high up in a tree several times, but never close. These birds are 9½ inches from the tip of bill to the tip of tail. Very strange looking birds, and always such a thrill to see one.

My actual destination on 9 July 2020 was the Alberta Birds of Prey Centre, near Lethbridge. I know some people feel that photographing birds that are not out in the wild is cheating. I kind of agree, though I think it's fine as long as someone says where a photo was taken - wild or in captivity..

This Centre is a wonderful place that rehabilitates and releases (whenever possible) various birds of prey - hawks, owls, Bald Eagles, Turkey Vultures, and Golden Eagles. Some of these birds act as Wildlife Ambassadors, too, including educating the public away from the Centre. Sometimes, a bird is used as a foster parent, too. This year, great precautions were being taken in order to keep staff and visitors safe, so hand sanitizer and masks were available. There were only a few people when I was there and I only needed to wear the mask inside the gift store and when I held a tiny Burrowing Owl. Poor little thing, it sat on my gloved arm and stared at me. Maybe it wondered why it could only see my eyes and not the rest of my face. Because it had taken me so long to drive south, I didn't have too much time at the Centre, but long enough to photograph the Eagles and Owls.

I love the changing scenery as one drives south, and my drive was timed perfectly to catch the golden Canola fields. In 2019, maybe half way, I pulled over to take a few photos of an old barn and there was a truck just pulling away. I thought the guy might have been taking photos, too. We got talking and one of the things we both said was that we had never seen a blue field of Flax. Later in my drive, guess what I found : ) Looked beautiful, with blue on one side of the road and a field of yellow Canola on the opposite side. This year, I found Flax in a couple of places.

This was definitely a rewarding - and exhausting - day, full of sightings of all kinds. My favourite kind of day! Just wish my daughter could come with me on a long trip or two, but people are still not supposed to travel together in the same vehicle, because you can't keep 6 or more feet away from each other, even if one person sits in the back. I prefer to know that I continue to abide by the restrictions - means consideration towards other people.


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