Fluidr
about   tools   help   Y   Q   a         b   n   l
User / Clement Tang * / Sets / New Zealand experience
Clement Tang / 47 items

N 89 B 604 C 58 E Jan 5, 2017 F Jun 15, 2022
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

This image is included in a gallery "INTERPHOTO * TOP FLICKR 2022" curated by Gianfranco Marzetti.

A New Zealand icon, the tui is loved for its singing voice and unique plumage. At first glance the bird appears completely black except for a small tuft of white feathers at its neck and a small white wing patch, causing it to resemble a parson in clerical attire. On closer inspection it can be seen that tui have brown feathers on the back and flanks, a multi-coloured iridescent sheen that varies with the angle from which the light strikes them, and a dusting of small, white-shafted feathers on the back and sides of the neck that produce a lacy collar. The name tui is from the Māori name tūī and is the species formal common name. It is only found in New Zealand.

This bird came to feed on the nectar of the New Zealand flax outside the Apartment we were staying in Franz Josef, South Island. The morning light was beautiful. The yellow-orange powder on its forehead was the pollen from the red flax flower.

Tags:   Tui bird watcher Franz Josef New Zealand South Island lacy collar New Zeland Icon geo tagged Nature National Geographic narrow depth of field Telephoto lens Macro photography close-up closetonature Concordians Summer morning New Zealand flax Parson bird yellow pollen Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae avian red flax flower floral on the move feeding travel iridescent sheen plumage yellow-orange pollen in gallery

N 86 B 1.3K C 131 E Jan 10, 2017 F Jun 10, 2022
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

This image is included in a gallery "Exposición Siabala III. Austellung" curated by Luis Siabala Valer.

This was taken at the Rose Garden at the New Zealand Gardens, which is part of Botanic Gardens in Christchurch.

The Christchurch Botanic Gardens, located in the central city of Christchurch, New Zealand, were founded in 1863 when an English oak was planted to commemorate the solemnisation of the marriage of Prince Albert and Princess Alexandra of Denmark.

Tags:   yellow rose orange rose pink rose garden roses Christchurch Botanic Gardens South Island New Zealand floral flower Summer morning geo tagged Oil painting filter Macro photography close-up narrow depth of field Nature National Geographic closetonature Concordians Travel New Zealand Gardens impressionistic in gallery Rose Garden

N 266 B 9.9K C 149 E Jan 10, 2017 F Jun 9, 2022
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Diminish And Ascend is a welded aluminum stairway sculpture by David McCracken.

New Zealand artist David McCracken designed the sculpture to be constructed from welded aluminum. The dimensions of the structure are 12 metres (39 ft) x 1.45 metres (4.8 ft) x 3.8 metres (12 ft). It is installed in Christchurch Botanic Gardens in Kiosk Lake. It is a stairway sculpture which is meant to be an optical illusion. The illusion is achieved due to wider steps at the bottom of the sculpture which gradually decrease in size with each step until they come to a vanishing point at the top. The steps at the top are just a few centimeters wide. When viewed from certain angles it appears to be an endless stairway.

In 2013, the sculpture was first displayed in Bondi Beach, Australia, at the Sculpture by the Sea event. It was then moved to Waiheke Island in New Zealand. In 2016 it was moved to the Christchurch Botanic Gardens in New Zealand. The cost of the sculpture was NZ$192,000. The cost of the sculpture was funded with a grant from the Friends of the Botanic Gardens, and sponsorship from Christchurch City Council Art in Public Spaces Fund.

Of interest to note : the NZ$700 per month cost of maintenance for the sculpture (mainly to remove bird droppings) is covered by the Christchurch City Council.

(Explored : Jun 9, 2022 #118)

Tags:   Diminish And Ascend David McCracken Christchurch South Island New Zealand Travel Summer morning Art Installation large artwork Kiosk Lake Christchurch Botanic Gardens National Geographic geo tagged water scape Grande Mare Group Scenics,not justlandscapes! Landscape HDR Sidelit water reflection silhouette gum tree blue sky still water Concordians welded aluminum stairway sculpture in explore explored

N 125 B 2.1K C 211 E Jan 3, 2017 F May 14, 2022
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

This was taken on a cold, drizzly summer afternoon. The light was lacklustre and the tides were not conducive to facilitate any Blowhole activities. Looking beyond the horizon is Tasman Sea.

The Pancake Rocks are a heavily eroded limestone area where the sea bursts through several vertical blowholes during high tides. Together with the 'pancake'-layering of the limestone (created by immense pressure on alternating hard and soft layers of marine creatures and plant sediments), these form the main attraction of the area. The base of the limestone was laid down and formed between 25 million and 35 million years ago.

Stylobedding is the name given to the process which formed the pancake layering. The current theory on how this happens is that following the limestone being buried up to kilometre below the seabed, it comes under pressure dissolution and the thinner layers of mud between the limestone are dissolved more quickly than the limestone, when exposed. This leaves the effect of the Pancake Rock layers.

Punakaiki is a small community on the West Coast of the South Island of New Zealand, between Westport and Greymouth. The community lies on the edge of the Paparoa National Park. The Pancake Rocks are a very popular tourist destination at Dolomite Point south of the main village.

Tags:   Pancake Rocks West Coast South Island New Zealand Geological feature geo tagged Travel HDR wide angle lens Oil painting filter Nature National Geographic closetonature Concordians Scenics,not justlandscapes! Landscape seascape water scape limestone stacks bad weather drizzling Summer afternoon inclement weather Grande Mare Group Stylobedding Dolomite Point Punakaiki Blowholes Tasman Sea

N 131 B 2.2K C 192 E Jan 2, 2017 F Apr 26, 2022
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

This image is included in 3 galleries :- 1) "Favourite Landscapes" curated by MK Hardy, 2) "INTERPHOTO * TOP FLICKR 2022" by Gianfranco Marzetti and 3) "Best Of 4" by
William White.

The Fifeshire / Arrow Rock is an iconic landmark of Nelson waterfront off State Highway 6, South Island, Newzealand. The rock is illuminated after dark and before sunrise.
Nelson is a city on the eastern shores of Tasman Bay, and is the economic and cultural centre of the Nelson Region. Nelson is the oldest city in the South Island and the second-oldest settled city in New Zealand, It was established in 1841 and was proclaimed a city by royal charter in 1858.

This was taken after sunset. Clouds were thick and the sky was intensely deep blue before turning completely dark. Arrow Rock was lit by flood light from the shore.

Tags:   The Fifeshire / Arrow Rock Nelson South Island New Zealand Nature National Geographic closetonature wide angle lens long exposure HDR flood light illumination Travel Grande Mare Group Tasman Bay Scenics,not justlandscapes! Landscape seascape Geological feature geo tagged Concordians dark blue sky water reflection water scape minimalistic abstraction night scene in gallery


10.6%