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User / Clement Tang * / Sets / Great Ocean Road
Clement Tang / 59 items

N 76 B 575 C 43 E Apr 4, 2015 F Jun 17, 2022
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This image is included in a gallery "INTERPHOTO * THE SEA / IL MARE" curated by Gianfranco Marzetti.

The Great Ocean Road is an Australian National Heritage listed 243 kilometres stretch of road along the south-eastern coast of Australia between the Victorian cities of Torquay and Allansford.

The Arch is 6 km west of Port Campbell, Victoria. The Arch looked beautiful in the morning Autumnal light. It was a fine day, but the on-shore waves were strong.

Tags:   The Arch Port Campbell Victoria Australia Autumn Morning HDR Oil painting filter CPL filter turquoise water seascape water scape Landscape Scenics,not justlandscapes! Sidelit blue sky blue sea white waves white clouds gum tree Geological feature geo tagged Nature National Geographic closetonature Concordians Travel limestone sea arch misty Grande Mare Group shadows seaside plants Great Ocean Road heritage listed horizon wide angle lens in gallery

N 142 B 7.2K C 407 E Apr 4, 2015 F Apr 25, 2015
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This image is included in 2 galleries :- 1) "cloudy skies" curated by haiku_rose, 2) "Sea and Mountain2" by Marinyu Anyu and 3) "72/ MASTERWORKS 05" by PACO WEAVING.

A stone's throw before reaching the 12 Apostles is a sightseeing stopoff called Gibson Steps. Reaching the beach surface via 86 steps, two huge limestone stacks, referred to as Gog and Magog by locals, are towering into the sky at an arm's length. Surveying these stacks at such a close distance, visitors are easily "dwarfed" if not enthralled.

Gog and Magog are names that appear in the Old Testament and in numerous subsequent works, including the Book of Revelation and the Qur'an, sometimes indicating individuals and sometimes lands and peoples. Sometimes, but not always, they are connected with the "end times", and the passages from the Book of Ezekiel and Book of Revelation in particular have attracted attention for this reason.

According to Alison Dods of Parks Victoria, Australia, the larger one on the left is Gog the male and the smaller on the right is MaGog and is the female.

Tags:   12 apostles Great Ocean Road Port Campbell travel Autumn backlit landscape seascape waterscape Victoria Australia concordians wildlife nature GrandeMareGroup closetonature National Geographic weathering erosion waves on green sea water NGC sea ocean sky shore outdoor Gog and Magog limestone stacks beach HDR in gallery Scenics,notjustlandscapes!

N 142 B 3.5K C 173 E Nov 22, 2016 F May 30, 2021
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This image is included a gallery ""LANDSCAPE VOL 18" curated by Jean-paul Vancoppenolle

This was taken on a Spring afternoon. Eva and Tom are slightly backlit. The sea is choppy and clouds are angry looking.

Previously known as Island Archway, they are about 160 metres from Loch Ard Gorge. The arch collapsed in June 2009 and the two remaining rock pillars have since been officially named Tom and Eva after the two survivors of the Loch Ard shipwreck.

Australian's European history has numerous stories of shipwrecks, and one of the worst tragedies was that of the Loch Ard, wrecked on Mutton Bird Island reefs in 1878, just off the Shipwreck Coast in Victoria, Australia.

The Loch Ard was an iron-hulled three masted clipper ship, whose name came from a lake just west of the village of Aberfoyle in Scotland. It was on a non-stop voyage from London to Melbourne with passengers that included members of the Carmichael family. Three months out from London, after days of fog and haze, Captain Gibb had trouble calculating his position for the critical pass into Bass Strait's western entrance (a 90 km passage between the coast and King Island). On the 1st June, 1878, the captain tried to take evasive action when he saw how close they were to the cliffs. This was to no avail when the ship struck the reefs of Mutton Bird Island, just off the coast.The mast and rigging smashed, some of it onto the deck and trapping some people, others were washed overboard, then the ship began to roll. It took only fifteen minutes for the Loch Ard to sink. Of the 54 passengers and crew, there were only two survivors, Tom Pearce, a member of the crew and 18 year old Eva Carmichael, who was travelling with her family. Tom, clinging to a overturned lifeboat, was washed into a deep gorge, that now bears the name the Loch Ard Gorge. Eva, who could not swim, managed to cling to some wreckage from the ship, which drifted through huge twin cliffs into a small bay of the gorge. She was very exhausted, and Tom saw her in the waves and despite being exhausted himself, swam out to rescue her, and after an hour long struggle managed to bring her safely back to land. Tom took Eva to a cave at the end of the gorge, then climbed the cliffs to get help, not seeing the steps that were already cut into the cliff face. He ran into a party from nearby Glenample Station who returned with him to rescue Eva. After their recovery they never saw each other again, as Eva returned to Ireland and later married. Tom eventually became a ship's captain.

(Sourced from Internet)

Tags:   Eva and Tom Spring afternoon HDR Great Ocean Road Grande Mare Group backlit blue sky blue sea white waves choppy sea Landscape Scenics,not justlandscapes! Geological feature Oil painting filter CPL filter Victoria Australia Nature National Geographic limestone stacks waterscape Travel closetonature Concordians geo tagged Island Archway sea cliff coastal flora blue green sea Tom and Eva Port Campbell seascape Simply Superb in gallery

N 147 B 2.7K C 212 E Apr 4, 2015 F May 20, 2021
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This image is included in 3 galleries 1) "Landscapes" curated by Scott Kennedy, 2) "Amazing Coasts" by KAIAZ75 and 3) "Sea" by cristian salvadori.

Port Campbell National Park is world famous for its extraordinary collection of wave-sculpted rock formations and the Twelve Apostles. The rock stack is called the "Razorback". The sharp edges and bumps along its back are caused by wind-blown spray, which hardens small areas of rock. The softer rock around these erodes away, leaving an uneven surface. Wave energy channelled along the side of the stack carves the deep smooth grooves just above sea level. With one wave every 14 seconds, there is a lot of erosion over a year, a century, or a thousand years.

The Razorback once extended much further out to sea. The force of the waves gradually eroded and undercut the base of the stack. Vertical cracks in the stack were widened by rainwater, forming a line of weakness. Huge blocks of rock then collapsed into the sea, leaving the rock shelf we can see today. Info according to Parks Victoria.

Tags:   Razorback Great Ocean Road Grande Mare Group Nature National Geographic closetonature Concordians Victoria Australia Autumn Morning Sidelit HDR green water white clouds blue sky white waves Travel Geological feature geo tagged Landscape waterscape Scenics,not justlandscapes! rock formation erosion wave-sculpted rock formations wide angle lens in gallery CPL filter Port Campbell National Park seascape

N 115 B 4.1K C 364 E Apr 3, 2015 F Apr 8, 2015
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Port Campbell National Park is world famous for its extraordinary collection of wave-sculpted rock formations and the Twelve Apostles. The rock stack is called the "Razorback". The sharp edges and bumps along its back are caused by wind-blown spray, which hardens small areas of rock. The softer rock around these erodes away, leaving an uneven surface. Wave energy channelled along the side of the stack carves the deep smooth grooves just above sea level. With one wave every 14 seconds, there is a lot of erosion over a year, a century, or a thousand years. The Razorback once extended much further out to sea. The force of the waves gradually eroded and undercut the base of the stack. Vertical cracks in the stack were widened by rainwater, forming a line of weakness. Huge blocks of rock then collapsed into the sea, leaving the rock shelf we can see today. Info according to Parks Victoria.

This image is included in a gallery "TERRA VOLLS.3" curated by terziluciano.

Tags:   Port Campbell National Park Razorback limestone stack autumn evening Victoria Australia travel Nature rock stack National Geographic concordians GrandeMareGroup landscape waterscape wave-sculpted rock formation clouds seascape weathering HDR in gallery Scenics,notjustlandscapes! CPL filter


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