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User / Clement Tang * / Sets / Small Birds
Clement Tang / 163 items

N 132 B 1.7K C 197 E Mar 11, 2022 F Jun 2, 2022
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Australia’s most widespread swallow, the Welcome Swallow can be seen fluttering, swooping and gliding in search of flying insects in almost any habitat, between city buildings, over farmland paddocks, in deserts, wetlands, forests and grasslands and every habitat in between. Sometimes they even occur at sea — the name ‘Welcome’ swallow comes from sailors who knew that the sight of a swallow meant that land was not far away. Swallows build their mud nests in many different situations, though most noticeably beneath bridges and on the walls of buildings. (Birdlife Victoria)

Tags:   Welcome Swallow Hirundo neoxena Hirundinidae avian bird watcher Autumn afternoon high tone high ISO closetonature close-up Macro photography Telephoto lens Cranbourne Gardens Victoria Australia geo tagged small bird Nature National Geographic Concordians resting Travel narrow depth of field Royal Botanic Gardens

N 104 B 2.4K C 171 E Mar 11, 2022 F Apr 7, 2022
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This image is included in a gallery 'INTERPHOTO * TOP FLICKR 2022' curated by Gianfranco Marzetti.

The Brown Thornbill is a small bird, but is one of the medium-sized and more common of the thornbills. It has olive-brown to grey upperparts, with a warm reddish-brown forehead scalloped with paler markings. The rump has a reddish-brown patch, the tail is grey-brown with a black band and a pale tip, and the underparts are off-white, streaked blackish on the chin, throat and chest. The eye is dark red. The sexes are similar and young birds are only slightly different to adults, with a duller eye.

The Brown Thornbill is found only in eastern and south-eastern Australia, including Tasmania.

The Brown Thornbill feeds mainly on insects, but may sometimes eat seeds, nectar or fruit. They feed, mainly in pairs, at all levels from the ground up, but mostly in understorey shrubs and low trees. Will feed in mixed flocks with other thornbills out of breeding season.

The Brown Thornbill may lack the flamboyance of a rosella or the melodious song of a butcherbird, but for many people in eastern and south-eastern Australia, they are a familiar and friendly face in the garden or the bush alike. With a cheeky demeanour, bold attitude and frenetic buzzing calls, these diminutive birds have the ability to brighten the day of anyone nearby. (Birdlife Australia)

Brown thornbill (Acanthiza pusilla) sometimes mimics the hawk warning call of a variety of birds to scare off predators threatening its nest. (Professor Robert Magrath of ANU)

Tags:   Brown Thornbill Acanthiza pusilla bird watcher avian oak tree nuts pine tree needles blurred backgroun Autumn afternoon Macro photography close-up Telephoto lens Travel Cranbourne Botanic Gardens daydreaming feeding narrow depth of field Nature National Geographic closetonature Concordians geo tagged brown bokeh Wildlife pine nuts portrait format Casuarina equisetifolia pine she oak seeds whistling pine tree she-oak songbird Victoria Australia in gallery

N 114 B 2.2K C 187 E Mar 11, 2022 F Mar 28, 2022
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The red-browed finch (Neochmia temporalis) is an estrildid finch that inhabits the east coast of Australia. This species has also been introduced to French Polynesia. It is commonly found in temperate forest and dry savannah habitats. It may also be found in dry forest and mangrove habitats in tropical region.

The species is distinguished by the bright red stripe above the eye, and bright red rump. The rest of the body is grey, with olive wing coverts and collar. Juveniles do not have red brow marks, and lack olive colouration on the collar and wing coverts. The adults are 11–12 cm long. (Wikipedia)

Red-browed Finches may also be called Red-browed Firetails. Both sexes are similar in appearance. This was my first encounter of this species.

Tags:   Red-browed Finch bird watcher Royal Botanic Gardens Cranbourne Neochmia temporalis wildlife nature closetonature Concordians National Geographic travel autumn afternoon pine nuts pine needles geo tagged soft light backlit macro photography close-up narrow depth of field estrildid first encounter blurry background Red-browed Firetail green bokeh gum nuts avian allocasuarina littoralis Black She-Oak

N 344 B 12.0K C 243 E Mar 11, 2022 F Mar 12, 2022
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This image is included in 2 galleries :- 1) "Birds I Hope to See One Day" curated by Sue Milks and 2) "Birds." by Irina Miroshnikova .

The Brown Thornbill is a small bird, but is one of the medium-sized and more common of the thornbills. It has olive-brown to grey upperparts, with a warm reddish-brown forehead scalloped with paler markings. The rump has a reddish-brown patch, the tail is grey-brown with a black band and a pale tip, and the underparts are off-white, streaked blackish on the chin, throat and chest. The eye is dark red. The sexes are similar and young birds are only slightly different to adults, with a duller eye.

The Brown Thornbill is found only in eastern and south-eastern Australia, including Tasmania.

The Brown Thornbill feeds mainly on insects, but may sometimes eat seeds, nectar or fruit. They feed, mainly in pairs, at all levels from the ground up, but mostly in understorey shrubs and low trees. Will feed in mixed flocks with other thornbills out of breeding season.

The Brown Thornbill may lack the flamboyance of a rosella or the melodious song of a butcherbird, but for many people in eastern and south-eastern Australia, they are a familiar and friendly face in the garden or the bush alike. With a cheeky demeanour, bold attitude and frenetic buzzing calls, these diminutive birds have the ability to brighten the day of anyone nearby. (Birdlife Australia)

Brown thornbill (Acanthiza pusilla) sometimes mimics the hawk warning call of a variety of birds to scare off predators threatening its nest. (Professor Robert Magrath of ANU)

Previously mis-identified as Golden Whistler.

(Explored: Mar 14, 2022 #128)

Tags:   bird watcher Cranbourne Gardens Wildlife Nature closetonature close-up Concordians pine tree pine needles brown background shadows shades Victoria Australia Macro photography Telephoto lens Royal Botanic Gardens Cranbourne small bird avian adult songbird geo tagged in explore explored Brown Thornbill Acanthiza pusilla Acanthizidae whistling pine tree Casuarina equisetifolia pine tree seeds

N 129 B 2.4K C 238 E Nov 5, 2012 F Dec 6, 2021
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Tags:   Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach bird watcher Nam Sang Wai Road Hong Kong Travel Wildlife Nature closetonature Concordians National Geographic geo tagged green bokeh green background overcast Macro photography close-up Telephoto lens Autumn afternoon avian Yuen Long 南生圍 元朗 香港 棕背佰勞 山背河 Shan Pui River


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