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Mark Heatherington / 6 items

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Cascade Mountains - Jackson County - Oregon - USA

Habitat : Forests
Food : Insects
Nesting : Ground
Behavior : Foliage Gleaner
Conservation : Low Concern

"A small, sprightly songbird of second-growth forests, the Nashville Warbler breeds in both north-central North America and an isolated portion of the mountainous Pacific Northwest. It nests on the ground and feeds almost exclusively on insects." - Cornell University Lab of Ornithology

Tags:   Nashville Warbler Oreothlypis ruficapilla Female Immature Cascade Mountains Jackson County Oregon USA Mark Heatherington

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Adult female

Emigrant Lake - Jackson County - Oregon - USA

Habitat : Forests
Food : Insects
Nesting : Tree
Behavior : Foliage Gleaner
Conservation : Low Concern

"The Black-throated Gray Warbler is a striking yet monochrome warbler that wears only a tiny spot of yellow just above and in front of the eye. Its black throat and gray back give it its name, but its bold black-and-white striped face is equally eye catching. The Black-throated Gray Warbler frequents pine and mixed pine-oak forests west of the Rocky Mountains and spends the winters farther south to Mexico. It sings a buzzy song of zeedle zeedle zeedle zeet-chee." - Cornell University Lab of Ornithology

Tags:   Black-throated gray warbler Dendroica nigrescens female warbler Emigrant Lake Rogue Valley Jackson County Oregon USA Mark Heatherington

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My guess is an immature Myrtle (any corrections are welcome)

Habitat : Forests
Food : Inscects
Nesting : Tree
Behavior : Foliage Gleaner
Conservation : Low Concern

"Yellow-rumped Warblers are perhaps the most versatile foragers of all warblers. They're the warbler you're most likely to see fluttering out from a tree to catch a flying insect, and they're also quick to switch over to eating berries in fall. Other places Yellow-rumped Warblers have been spotted foraging include picking at insects on washed-up seaweed at the beach, skimming insects from the surface of rivers and the ocean, picking them out of spiderwebs, and grabbing them off piles of manure." - Cornell University Lab of Ornithology

Tags:   Yellow-rumped Warbler Setophaga coronata Emigrant Lake Rogue Valley Jackson County Oregon USA Warbler Mark Heatherington

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Emigrant Lake - Jackson County - Oregon - USA

Habitat : Forests
Food : Inscects
Nesting : Tree
Behavior : Foliage Gleaner
Conservation : Low Concern

"Yellow-rumped Warblers are perhaps the most versatile foragers of all warblers. They're the warbler you're most likely to see fluttering out from a tree to catch a flying insect, and they're also quick to switch over to eating berries in fall. Other places Yellow-rumped Warblers have been spotted foraging include picking at insects on washed-up seaweed at the beach, skimming insects from the surface of rivers and the ocean, picking them out of spiderwebs, and grabbing them off piles of manure." - Cornell University Lab of Ornithology

4002

Tags:   Yellow-rumped Warbler Setophaga coronata Male Audubon's Warbler Bird Wildlife Nature Emigrant Lake Jackson County Oregon USA Mark Heatherington

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For the last few months I've been studying how to up my photography game at the prestigious University of YouTube (actually I found many very helpful videos). The two most common suggestions I was not following were using a tripod and camo. Last month I shelled out the big bucks for a real tripod. Night and day difference from my $30 Walmart special. I must admit that I always thought camo was a bit hyped. How could dressing like a shrub magically make you disappear. I finally gave in and decided to "camo out." More bucks spent at LL Bean and Amazon. I got head to toe camo including a balaclava. I also got camo burlap to cover my tripod, chair and camera bag. To test the camo I went to a meadow in the Cascades that is known for many types of shy Warblers. I've never been able to get closer than 30 meters before they would fly off. I set up about 30 minutes before sunrise feeling a bit silly. The silly feeling went away shortly when this Warbler landed in the tree above my head, flew down and landed in the shrub I had set up on. It really seemed to not see me. Even after the clicking began, It looked around but could not locate the source of the noise. I'm sold on camo.

Tags:   9715 Wilson's Warbler Cardellina pusilla Warbler Bird Nature Wildlife Cascade Mountains Jackson County Oregon USA Mark Heatherington


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