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User / andyrousephotography / Sets / The odd lighthouse and other things
Andy Rouse / 23 items

N 108 B 6.1K C 31 E Jun 21, 2020 F Jun 26, 2020
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Lune estuary, Fleetwood, Lancashire

Plover Scar Lighthouse, also known as the Abbey Lighthouse, is an active 19th century lighthouse sited at the entrance of the Lune estuary, near Cockersand Abbey in Lancashire, England. The lighthouse is maintained by the Lancaster Port Commission. It is registered under the international Admiralty number A4876 and has the NGA identifier of 114-5144.

The lighthouse consists of an 8-metre-high (26 ft) white conical stone tower, with a black lantern and twin galleries, built on a rock ledge that is uncovered at low tide. With a focal height of 6m above sea level, the light can be seen for six nautical miles. Its light characteristic is made up of a flash of white light every two seconds.

History
The lighthouse was built in 1847, as the lower light of a pair of leading lights, and is therefore also called the front or Low Light. The rear or High Light, known as Cockersand Lighthouse, once stood next to the Abbey Lighthouse cottage on Slack Lane. It was a square wooden tower supported by angled wooden struts. The leading lights helped ships navigate into the Lune estuary, to reach Glasson Dock and then onwards via the Lancaster Canal to the port of Lancaster, with Plover Scar marking the rocky outcrop at the edge of the deep-water channel into the estuary. Both lighthouses were equipped with a pair of paraffin lamps mounted in parabolic reflectors, each displaying fixed light seawards. In the early 1950s electric lamps replaced the oil lanterns; at the same time the wooden High Light was replaced by a metal framework tower. By the end of the decade the lights were fully automated; the High Light was deactivated sometime after 1985 but Plover Scar remains active.

Keepers
Former keepers' cottage at the site of the demolished Cockersand light
Prior to automation the lighthouse keepers and their families lived in the lighthouse cottage next to the Cockersand lighthouse. Originally the accommodation was incorporated into the base of the lighthouse structure, but was later replaced by the cottage that still stands today. The keepers maintained both lighthouses, walking across to Plover Scar at low tide. The Raby family kept the lights for nearly a century, until 1945 when it was taken over by the Parkinson family. Mrs Parkinson was filmed maintaining the lights in 1948 by the British Pathé news organisation.

2016 collision damage
In March 2016, the lighthouse was badly damaged when it was struck by a passing commercial vessel, which was navigating its way at night to Glasson Docks. The collision dislodged the upper part of the tower, and although the light continued to operate, substantial reconstruction of the tower was deemed necessary. The subsequent repairs which started in September 2016 meant the stone tower had to be partially dismantled, with the lantern removed for renovation. Over 200 stone blocks from the dismantled tower were taken to a work site on the beach and numbered so that they could be reused when the light was rebuilt. The works also revealed that an extra outer layer of stones had been built around the tower, which had been added in 1856 to create an outer walkway. Although the works were delayed by various factors, they were finally completed in May 2017.

I think it looks more like a chess piece bishop!

Tags:   Plover Scar lighthouse Lune estuary Lancashire sunset backlit tidal beach

N 96 B 4.8K C 20 E Jun 21, 2020 F Jun 22, 2020
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Fleetwood, River Wyre, Lancashire

My first proper outing since Skye in February with Muddy Boots UK to a couple of locations I’ve never been to. The evening didn’t start too well with a late packing of my gear. Usually, everything is in its place but I couldn't find my cable-release. I wrecked the house trying to find it only to leave the mess to Mrs R to clear up!

I didn’t fair better with the navigation either... looked up the wrong area! Luckily, Muddy knew where we were heading. Anyway, enough of my calamities. we got there.

These wrecks are very accessible with a well-trodden path right up to them but the surrounding mud is very slippy and attempts to pull your wellies off with every step... so be warned!

Conditions were too bright at the time of our visit hence the mono conversion, but this would make a great location for sunrise or with a stormy backdrop. The boats in the graveyard are mostly all Fleetwood Trawlers left over from the Cod Wars of the 1970’s when the ships owners were paid to scrap them by the government.

Tags:   Fleetwood trawlers boats wrecks graveyard River Wyre mono black & white B&W

N 130 B 6.2K C 21 E Jun 30, 2018 F Jul 15, 2018
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Perch Rock Lighthouse, New Brighton, Wirral

An outing with Eddie (mid World Cup) to meet-up with Mark and Graham at New Brighton to photograph what else... but that lighthouse. I think we're just waiting on you now Mr Dixon.

PS... anyone know the footy result?

Tags:   Perch Rock New Brighton Wirral lighthouse beach sand sea low tide sunset cloudless blue orange yellow red Lee filters 0.6 ND medium

N 77 B 5.2K C 21 E Jun 9, 2018 F Jun 11, 2018
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Llanddwyn Island, Anglesey, North Wales

Tŵr Bach (little tower) and Tŵr Mawr (big tower) are the two towers / lighthouses on the south-east and south-west tips of Ynys Llanddwyn. Tŵr Bach has been there a little longer than Tŵr Mawr, though there seems to be no precise record of when either tower was built.

It’s also quite hard to find the truth about why the towers were built, but it seems Tŵr Bach was originally built as a landmark and day beacon (an unlit lighthouse). However, it was built in the wrong place – it couldn’t easily be seen by ships approaching from the west. Therefore, Tŵr Mawr was built to replace it.
Tŵr Mawr is on a higher, more westerly promontory and definitely more visible from most directions. As its name suggests it is bigger than Tŵr Bach, standing nearly 11m tall. The first navigational beacon was put in Tŵr Mawr in 1845 and it became a working lighthouse on 1st January 1846.

For nearly 130 years Tŵr Mawr continued as a lighthouse, while Tŵr Bach lay dormant at its side. But in 1975 when Tŵr Mawr ceased operation, Tŵr Bach became the site for the installation of a new, modern navigation beacon. So now, Tŵr Bach is the working tower, while Tŵr Mawr is a striking and iconic landmark for Ynys Llanddwyn.

Tags:   Llanddwyn Island Anglesey North Wales lighthouses beacons Tŵr Bach Tŵr Mawr towers stone white-washed sunshine clouds

N 125 B 5.5K C 28 E Jun 9, 2018 F Jun 12, 2018
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Llanddwyn Island, Anglesey, North Wales

Although a nice day out in Anglesey, it was never going to be great photography, but the camera gear duly came, just in case. I hoped I could pull something out of the bag here as we'd (Eddie Coulson and I) missed this viewpoint on our first visit way back in February - the glorious Sunday before the beast from the east came a calling.

Out of a dozen frames only this one hinted at any light movement between the clouds but colour just didn't cut it in post-processing so I've gone for the mono conversion using Nik Silver Efex Pro 2 (I note this is now available again for Photoshop CC via DxO and a subscription fee).

I like the woman sat at the bottom of the steps reading... just like Mrs R, sat on the beach near the disused boathouse, reading her Kindle. No one to carry my tripod anymore... I'm sure it was in our vows!

Tags:   Llanddwyn Island Anglesey North Wales lighthouses beacons Tŵr Bach Tŵr Mawr towers stone white-washed sunshine clouds tripod-carrier Kindle conversion black and white b&w


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