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Places / United Kingdom / England / East Sussex / Newhaven
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Just deleted several hundred shots of this bird to finish with just ten. So my last one to post - may be it will return this year as an adult???

Tags:   Red-backed Shrike - Juvenile Lanius collurio Tide Mills Sussex

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Taken 10/01/17; along with Marine and Harbour, this is one of three stations in Newhaven. Newhaven with its cross channel sea traffic was a target for railway developers and the town was reached in 1847 by a branch off of the Brighton to Eastbourne line at Southerham Junction.
It was probably significant in Newhaven's development that the town was connected to the railway earlier than was for the case for nearby Shoreham. However, the heyday of the railway has passed; there is no longer a West Quay Branch for Terriers to shunt, the port no longer sees significant Cross-Channel passenger or freight traffic to Dieppe, the line beyond Newhaven has been singled, Marine station has been unused since 2006 and I doubt the aggregate trains still work to the North Quay. On the plus side, as Pondhopper1 has pointed out on my previous upload, the new Incinerator at Newhaven has seen a renaissance of freight traffic.

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Taken 10/01/17; Newhaven Town Box is looking slightly sorry for itself. However, I have found the following interesting history on the internet:

"The signalbox at Newhaven Town station is a wooden signalbox designed by Saxby and Farmer who were Victorian signalling contractors. The box was opened in 1879 and controlled the railway traffic by means of Track points, signals and locking mechanisms (for safety) using a 24 lever frame (called a "Rocker Frame" which was designed by the same company.
Over the next 30 years, because of growing needs for industry sidings and other infrustructure, the building was physically extended by a quarter to enable more levers to be installed. By 1917 there were 41 levers in the frame, all of which were in use, and there was also a wheel for controlling the original wooden crossing gates. Both world wars had a significant influence on the signalboxes workings. Much rationalising and simplification occured over the next 40 years, which steadily resulted in a few spare levers. In 1953 the box aquired a replacement lever frame from Three Bridges signalbox, it is called a Westinghouse A2 frame and is the current frame in use today. The building needed a few big changes to support this frame, a brick extension to the rear was put on and this is where most of the frame sits. This is partly to improve the Signalmans view out the front windows although it also meant space for an indoor toilet room was available rather than an outside privy.
Over the next 50 years or so, with the decline of railfreight through the port, the closure of the Engine sheds and the West quay branchline to the Breakwater, when combined with moving of freight haulage from rail to road all resulted in a steady decline in the use of the industrial sidings and other infrustructure which consequently became redundant. As a result the number of working levers in the signalbox was significantly reduced. Another notable change was the replacement in 1964, of the old crossing gates by the current barrier arrangement. The old wheel became redundant and the barriers are now controlled by a simple electrical panel. Over the years, because of all these changes even the entrance door has had 3 different positions, and the widening of the road finally forced it to the north end where entry is gained these days.
Today there are only 6 working levers, the remainder being 3 redundant levers and 31 white spare levers. The primary role of the signalbox in this day and age is to work the level crossing barriers and ensure that it is clear and safe for trains to pass over. It also works in conjuction with Lewes and Newhaven Harbour Signalboxes. Lewes signalbox controls and routes the trains from the main line at Southerham Junction onto the Branch towards Southease, Newhaven Town Box controls the passage of trains between Southease and the Harbour Station, and the Harbour signalbox takes care of the Harbour and Marine stations as well as the single line to Seaford.
It is hoped that the new incinerator (unpopular as it is) will generate the need for some sidings for transport of waste by rail. It is also likley that the crossover points to the south of the station together with its shunting signals could be re instated for use by the engines running round the hopper wagons carrying the refuse, which would generate the need for more levers to reinstated into working use. An external repaint is also on the cards but only time will tell whether any of this will happen."

www.ournewhaven.org.uk/page_id__2174_path__0p2p107p4p.aspx

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Taken 10/01/17 at New Road Roundabout, Newhaven; During the ASLEF Drivers Strike there were only limited replacement bus services. These three snaps show the Seaford to Lewes service.

Tags:   Regency Coaches Lewes


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