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Brandon Zehm / 45 items

N 3 B 12 C 0 E Jun 25, 2018 F Jun 25, 2018
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In descriptions of Yellow Loosestrife there's often been confusion about the color of Lysimachia punctata. That difficulty goes back on Pliny the Elder's Latin Natural History, which was almost a bible to naturalists down through the ages; and it was popular no doubt as well because you didn't have to go back to the Greek of many of the authorities he quotes.
But sometimes Pliny gets his translation from Greek to Latin wrong as in this case. What Dioscorides wrote in Greek about the color of our plant was 'flame-colored (πυρ́ῥόν) or golden-yellow' which Pliny rendered in a single word as 'purple'. So later botanists who tried to identify the plant named in ancient texts - without of course having the real things to hand - were led astray. We can be grateful to John Bostock and J.H. Riley, great classical scholars of the nineteenth centuries, for having put this right in their translation of Pliny into English!
The English 'Loosestrife', by the way, is an incorrect translation of a Greek proper name - the king whom Pliny names - and goes back only to 1548.
And I do like Dioscorides' word 'flame-colored' for this Lysimachia. Look at a flame and you'll see how it fits.
Flame-thrower is being visited for its pollen by a Halictid Bee.


Tags:   Lysimachia punctata Halictid Bee Dioscorides Pliny the Elder Greek Latin John Bostock J.H. Riley Yellow Loosestrife yellow Halictid Bee Hortus Botanicus, Amsterdam, The Netherlands botanists purple

N 53 B 1.4K C 2 E Dec 24, 2016 F Jun 25, 2018
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N 38 B 649 C 5 E Jun 24, 2018 F Jun 24, 2018
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Anse Source d`Argent - La Digue Island - Seychelles 2017

Picture taken with:

Nikon DSLR D750

Tamron 17-35mm F2.8-4.0 & CL Polarizer
Lightroom 6.14

Panorama (2 Frames)

www.facebook.com/pages/e-t-d-j-t-pictures/101827806533288

© 2017 by e t d j t™ pictures / P.Jaussi

N 70 B 3.2K C 3 E Oct 19, 2016 F Jun 24, 2018
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N 41 B 425 C 16 E Jun 24, 2018 F Jun 24, 2018
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In the glum weather, I spent an hour or so watching our small Wild Bee - perhaps a Halictus of some kind - avidly gathering blue pollen from a clump of Sweet William. Other family members were foraging on flowers with yellow pollen. They all seemed choosy for a specific pollen, at least while I was looking, even if other-colored flowers were less than 30 cm away. So those various pollens weren't mixed. I wonder what the reason can be, or perhaps it's just a coincidence.

Tags:   Dianthus barbatus Sweet William Wild Bee Halictus sp. pollen blue pollen Hortus Botanicus, Amsterdam, The Netherlands insect bee


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