Fluidr
about   tools   help   Y   Q   a         b   n   l
User / Bill Bowman
Bill Bowman / 1,202 items

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

A bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) ram patrols the rocky slopes of Fall River Canyon in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). Once one of the more common large herbivores in the southern Rockies, bighorns are now far less abundant (though not endangered, except for some subspecies). Hunting of bighorns by humans in North America dates back several millennia (as indicated by rock art and bone fragments), but increased tremendously in the late 1800’s with commercial hunting for horns and meat. The bighorn population in RMNP is probably mostly a residual native group that hung on while other nearby populations went extinct, though reintroductions of bighorns have occurred just to the east of the park. While the numbers of bighorn sheep in RMNP have stabilized, they are still are threatened by habitat degradation and transmission of diseases from domestic grazers (sheep, cows) and introduced mountain goats.

The profuse orange lichens suggest this is a popular spot for animals to perch (chill)- xanthophyllous (pigment giving the orange color) lichens usually indicate urine deposits.

Tags:   bighorn sheep ram Ovis canadensis Rocky Mountain National Park Colorado

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

The dawn blue hour at Red Rock Lake, with the Indian Peaks wilderness in the background. Red Rock Lake was formed by a chunk of ice from the retreating Pleistocene glacier sometime around 12,000 years ago (aka kettle lake).

In the 4+ decades I've been visiting this small lake, it has been getting progressively more shallow, and the water lilies (Nuphar polysepala) fill more of the lake surface each summer. The trout stocked many years ago have disappeared, probably because the lake freezes to the bottom in the winter now. This natural progression happens in most shallow-ish lakes, but seems to have been fairly rapid here.

Tags:   Red Rock Lake Indian Peaks blue hour southern Rocky Mountains long exposure dawn

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

Wouldn't be a summer in the high country without a few pics of Shooting Stars (Dodecatheon pulchellum). These beauties grow from the plains of Colorado (5000' / 1500 m) to above treeline (12,000' / 3700 m)

Tags:   Dodecatheon pulchellum Shooting stars Niwot Ridge University of Colorado Mountain Research Station

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

The view of the Atigun River Gorge looking south into the core of the Brooks Range, seen from the front of a helicopter flying over the north ridge. The serrated ridge across the valley (~ 5000’/ 1500m) is composed up of the Fortress Mountain formation, a mix of marine and non-marine sediments, including, siltstones, conglomerates, and carbon rich strata with carbonized plant debris (logs/ coal) of Cretaceous age. Marine fossils (molluscs) occur in the lighter colored sediments. The influence of water in the drainage channels on vegetation is clear from the darker green stripes leading to the Atigun River. The higher peaks (all un-named) in the back are around 7000’ / 2100 m, some of which have remnant glaciers clinging to their slopes. At this latitude (68.5˚ N) the sun doesn’t set during the summer- this was taken around 9 pm, with the sun still fairly high in the WNW.

Tags:   Atigun River Gorge Atigun River Brooks Range Alaska Fortress Mountain Formation Arctic

  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • MAP
  • O
  • L
  • M

A muskox (umingmak, bearded one in the Inuit language), with a cloud of hungry blood sucking insects surrounding it like an aura of bad luck. The naturalist with us (from the U of AK Toolik Field Station) thought this was probably a male who had lost his top spot in a social group, and was destined to wander the tundra alone until he rejoins his herd later.

Thanks to Tom Blandford for his wonderful postings of these bovines over the years that have peeked my interest in them.

Tags:   Muskox Ovibos moschatus Umingmak mosquitoes biting flies Alaska tundra willow Toolik Field Station


0.4%