Fluidr
about   tools   help   Y   Q   a         b   n   l
User / RGL_Photography
53 items

N 38 B 2.4K C 16 E Dec 18, 2018 F Dec 18, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

Snowy Owl

The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large, white owl of the typical owl family. Snowy Owls are native to Arctic regions in North America and Eurasia. Younger Snowy Owls start with darker plumage, which turns lighter as they get older. Males are almost all white, while females have more flecks of gray plumage.

For more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowy_owl

Tags:   Beach Owl Birding BIrds Birds of Prey Birdwatching Bubo scandiacus Jersey Shore Long Beach Island Mother Nature Nature New Jersey Nikon AF-S 600mm F4G ED VR Nikon D5 Ocean County Ornithology Owls Only Raptors Raptors Snowy Owl Snowy's US United States Wildlife Wildlife Photography © 2018 RGL Photography

N 26 B 1.4K C 4 E Dec 1, 2018 F Dec 1, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

Merlin

The Merlin (Falco columbarius) is a small species of Falcon from the Northern Hemisphere, with numerous subspecies throughout North America and Eurasia. A bird of prey once known colloquially as a Pigeon Hawk in North America, the Merlin breeds in the northern Holarctic; some migrate to subtropical and northern tropical regions in winter. Males typically have wingspans of 21–23 inches, with females being slightly larger. They are swift fliers and skilled hunters who specialize in preying on small birds in the size range of sparrows to quail. The Merlin has for centuries been well regarded as a Falconry Bird. In recent decades Merlin populations in North America have been significantly increasing, with some Merlin’s becoming so well adapted to city life that they forgo migration.

For more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merlin_(bird)

Tags:   Birds Birds of Prey Birdwatching Falco columbarius Falcon Garden State Gateway National Recreation Area Jersey Shore Merlin Monmouth County Mother Nature Nikon AF-S 600mm F4G ED VR Nikon D5 Ornithology Pigeon Hawk Raptors Sandy Hook United States US Wildlife Wildlife Photography © 2018 RGL Photography

N 55 B 2.0K C 19 E Nov 5, 2018 F Nov 5, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

Red Fox

The Red Fox, Vulpes vulpes, is the largest of the true foxes and the most abundant wild member of the Carnivora, being present across the entire Northern Hemisphere from the Arctic Circle to North Africa, North America and Eurasia. It is listed as least concern by the IUCN. Its range has increased alongside human expansion, having been introduced to Australia, where it is considered harmful to native mammals and bird populations. Due to its presence in Australia, it is included among the list of the "world's 100 worst invasive species".

For more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_fox

Tags:   Carnivora Fox Red Fox Garden State Jersey Shore Fox Kit Kit Monmouth County Nature Mother Nature Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4G ED VR Nikon D500 United States US Vulpes vulpes Wild Kingdom Wildlife Wildlife Photography © 2018 RGL Photography

N 44 B 2.3K C 13 E Nov 1, 2018 F Nov 1, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

NEW JERSEY 2017 BALD EAGLE PROJECT REPORT

ANOTHER PRODUCTIVE YEAR FOR NJ’S EAGLES
by Larissa Smith, CWF Wildlife Biologist

The Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ in partnership with the NJ Endangered and Nongame Species Program has released the 2017 NJ Bald Eagle Project Report. In 2017, 178 eagle nests were monitored during the nesting season. Of these nests 153 were active (with eggs) and 25 were territorial or housekeeping pairs. One hundred and ninety young were fledged.

In 2017 the number of active nests was three more than in 2016, but the number young fledged decreased by 27 from a record high of 216 fledged in 2016. The productivity rate this season of 1.25 young/active nest is still above the required range of 0.0 to 1.1 for population maintenance. Productivity could be lower this season for many reasons including weather, predation and disturbance to the nesting area. In 2017 nest monitors reported several instances of “intruder” eagles at nests which did disrupt the nesting attempts of several pairs. One of these “eagle dramas” unfolded at the Duke Farms eagle cam watched by millions of people. An intruder female attempted to replace the current female. This harassment interrupted the pairs bonding and copulation and no eggs were laid.

This year’s report includes a section on Resightings of banded eagles. Resightings of NJ (green) banded eagles have increased over the years, as well as eagles seen in NJ that were banded in other states. These resightings are important, as they help us to understand eagle movements during the years between fledging and settling into a territory, as well as adult birds at a nest site.

For more info: www.conservewildlifenj.org/blog/2017/12/06/new-jersey-201...

New Jersey Bald Eagle Project Report | 2017 may be downloaded here: www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/ensp/pdf/eglrpt17.pdf

Tags:   American Bald Eagle Bald Eagle Birding Birds Birds of Prey Birdwatching Eagle Juvenile Bald Eagle Freedom Garden State God Bless America Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ Haliaeetus leucocephalus Jersey Shore 'Monmouth County NJDEP Endangered and Nongame Species Program's (ENSP) New Jersey Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4G ED VR Nikon D5 Raptors Symbol of America US United States Wildlife Wildlife Photography © 2018 RGL Photography

N 18 B 1.9K C 13 E Oct 13, 2018 F Oct 13, 2018
  • DESCRIPTION
  • COMMENT
  • O
  • L
  • M

NEW JERSEY 2017 BALD EAGLE PROJECT REPORT

ANOTHER PRODUCTIVE YEAR FOR NJ’S EAGLES
by Larissa Smith, CWF Wildlife Biologist

The Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ in partnership with the NJ Endangered and Nongame Species Program has released the 2017 NJ Bald Eagle Project Report. In 2017, 178 eagle nests were monitored during the nesting season. Of these nests 153 were active (with eggs) and 25 were territorial or housekeeping pairs. One hundred and ninety young were fledged.

In 2017 the number of active nests was three more than in 2016, but the number young fledged decreased by 27 from a record high of 216 fledged in 2016. The productivity rate this season of 1.25 young/active nest is still above the required range of 0.0 to 1.1 for population maintenance. Productivity could be lower this season for many reasons including weather, predation and disturbance to the nesting area. In 2017 nest monitors reported several instances of “intruder” eagles at nests which did disrupt the nesting attempts of several pairs. One of these “eagle dramas” unfolded at the Duke Farms eagle cam watched by millions of people. An intruder female attempted to replace the current female. This harassment interrupted the pairs bonding and copulation and no eggs were laid.

This year’s report includes a section on Resightings of banded eagles. Resightings of NJ (green) banded eagles have increased over the years, as well as eagles seen in NJ that were banded in other states. These resightings are important, as they help us to understand eagle movements during the years between fledging and settling into a territory, as well as adult birds at a nest site.

For more info: www.conservewildlifenj.org/blog/2017/12/06/new-jersey-201...

New Jersey Bald Eagle Project Report | 2017 may be downloaded here: www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/ensp/pdf/eglrpt17.pdf

Tags:   American Bald Eagle Asbury Park Bald Eagle Birding Birds Birds of Prey Birdwatching Eagle Freedom Garden State God Bless America Haliaeetus leucocephalus Jersey Shore County New Jersey Monmouth County Nikon D5 Raptors Symbol of America US United Sates Wildlife Wildlife Photography Juvenile Bald Eagle Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4G ED VR © 2018 RGL Photography


9.4%