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N 42 B 251 C 3 E Oct 22, 2018 F Oct 22, 2018
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Northern Harrier

The Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus) also known as the Hen Harrier is a bird of prey. It breeds throughout the northern parts of the northern hemisphere in Canada and the northernmost USA, and in northern Eurasia. This species is polytypic, with two subspecies. Marsh Hawk is a historical name for the American form.

It migrates to more southerly areas in winter. Eurasian birds move to southern Europe and southern temperate Asia, and American breeders to the southernmost USA, Mexico, and Central America. In the mildest regions, such as France, Great Britain, and the southern US, Northern Harrier may be present all year, but the higher ground is largely deserted in winter.

Harriers have an owl-like face. The concave facial disk and relatively large off-set ears enable the bird to use triangulation of sound to help locate prey such as mice, voles, juvenile rabbits, frogs, pheasant chick, and other birds in dense vegetation. The female Harrier is larger than the male; hence, the female takes larger prey than the male.

For more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hen_harrier

Tags:   Birding Birds Birds of Prey Birdwatching Garden State Gateway National Recreation Area Hen Harrier Jersey Shore Marsh Hawk Monmouth County New Jersey Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4G ED VR Nikon D5 Northern Harrier Raptors Sandy Hook US United States Wildlife Wildlife Photography © 2018 RGL Photography

N 45 B 533 C 10 E Oct 22, 2018 F Oct 22, 2018
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Northern Harrier

The Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus) also known as the Hen Harrier is a bird of prey. It breeds throughout the northern parts of the northern hemisphere in Canada and the northernmost USA, and in northern Eurasia. This species is polytypic, with two subspecies. Marsh Hawk is a historical name for the American form.

It migrates to more southerly areas in winter. Eurasian birds move to southern Europe and southern temperate Asia, and American breeders to the southernmost USA, Mexico, and Central America. In the mildest regions, such as France, Great Britain, and the southern US, Northern Harrier may be present all year, but the higher ground is largely deserted in winter.

Harriers have an owl-like face. The concave facial disk and relatively large off-set ears enable the bird to use triangulation of sound to help locate prey such as mice, voles, juvenile rabbits, frogs, pheasant chick, and other birds in dense vegetation. The female Harrier is larger than the male; hence, the female takes larger prey than the male.

For more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hen_harrier

Tags:   Birding Birds Birds of Prey Birdwatching Garden State Gateway National Recreation Area Hen Harrier Jersey Shore Marsh Hawk Monmouth County New Jersey Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4G ED VR Nikon D5 Northern Harrier Raptors Sandy Hook US United States Wildlife Wildlife Photography © 2018 RGL Photography

N 50 B 558 C 16 E Oct 22, 2018 F Oct 22, 2018
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Northern Harrier

The Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus) also known as the Hen Harrier is a bird of prey. It breeds throughout the northern parts of the northern hemisphere in Canada and the northernmost USA, and in northern Eurasia. This species is polytypic, with two subspecies. Marsh Hawk is a historical name for the American form.

It migrates to more southerly areas in winter. Eurasian birds move to southern Europe and southern temperate Asia, and American breeders to the southernmost USA, Mexico, and Central America. In the mildest regions, such as France, Great Britain, and the southern US, Northern Harrier may be present all year, but the higher ground is largely deserted in winter.

Harriers have an owl-like face. The concave facial disk and relatively large off-set ears enable the bird to use triangulation of sound to help locate prey such as mice, voles, juvenile rabbits, frogs, pheasant chick, and other birds in dense vegetation. The female Harrier is larger than the male; hence, the female takes larger prey than the male.

For more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hen_harrier

Tags:   Birding Birds Birds of Prey Birdwatching Garden State Gateway National Recreation Area Hen Harrier Jersey Shore Marsh Hawk Monmouth County New Jersey Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4G ED VR Nikon D5 Northern Harrier Raptors Sandy Hook US United States Wildlife Wildlife Photography © 2018 RGL Photography

N 47 B 675 C 29 E Oct 11, 2018 F Oct 20, 2018
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NEW JERSEY 2017 BALD EAGLE PROJECT REPORT

ANOTHER PRODUCTIVE YEAR FOR NJ’S EAGLES
by Larissa Smith, CWF Wildlife Biologist

The Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ in partnership with the NJ Endangered and Nongame Species Program has released the 2017 NJ Bald Eagle Project Report. In 2017, 178 eagle nests were monitored during the nesting season. Of these nests 153 were active (with eggs) and 25 were territorial or housekeeping pairs. One hundred and ninety young were fledged.

In 2017 the number of active nests was three more than in 2016, but the number young fledged decreased by 27 from a record high of 216 fledged in 2016. The productivity rate this season of 1.25 young/active nest is still above the required range of 0.0 to 1.1 for population maintenance. Productivity could be lower this season for many reasons including weather, predation and disturbance to the nesting area. In 2017 nest monitors reported several instances of “intruder” eagles at nests which did disrupt the nesting attempts of several pairs. One of these “eagle dramas” unfolded at the Duke Farms eagle cam watched by millions of people. An intruder female attempted to replace the current female. This harassment interrupted the pairs bonding and copulation and no eggs were laid.

This year’s report includes a section on Resightings of banded eagles. Resightings of NJ (green) banded eagles have increased over the years, as well as eagles seen in NJ that were banded in other states. These resightings are important, as they help us to understand eagle movements during the years between fledging and settling into a territory, as well as adult birds at a nest site.

For more info: www.conservewildlifenj.org/blog/2017/12/06/new-jersey-201...

New Jersey Bald Eagle Project Report | 2017 may be downloaded here: www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/ensp/pdf/eglrpt17.pdf

Tags:   Wildlife Photography Wildlife United States US Symbol of America Raptors Nikon D5 Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4G ED VR New Jersey Monmouth County Jersey Shore Haliaeetus leucocephalus God Bless America Garden State Freedom Fledgling Eagle Birdwatching Birds of Prey Birds Birding Bald Eagle Asbury Park American Bald Eagle © 2018 RGL Photography

N 33 B 849 C 10 E Oct 18, 2018 F Oct 19, 2018
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10/18/2018 - Braveheart’s Big Day - It was touch and go for awhile, but after 8 weeks of intensive medical treatment and rehab at The Raptor Trust of NJ, Braveheart was banded early this morning in preparation for his release. Many thanks to the good folks at The Raptor Trust, NJDEP Endangered & Nongame Species Program, Conserve Wildlife Foundation NJ, and Jon Palombi for all their hard work. Braveheart was released this morning in Monmouth County. Go Braveheart!!!

NEW JERSEY 2017 BALD EAGLE PROJECT REPORT

ANOTHER PRODUCTIVE YEAR FOR NJ’S EAGLES
by Larissa Smith, CWF Wildlife Biologist

The Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ in partnership with the NJ Endangered and Nongame Species Program has released the 2017 NJ Bald Eagle Project Report. In 2017, 178 eagle nests were monitored during the nesting season. Of these nests 153 were active (with eggs) and 25 were territorial or housekeeping pairs. One hundred and ninety young were fledged.

In 2017 the number of active nests was three more than in 2016, but the number young fledged decreased by 27 from a record high of 216 fledged in 2016. The productivity rate this season of 1.25 young/active nest is still above the required range of 0.0 to 1.1 for population maintenance. Productivity could be lower this season for many reasons including weather, predation and disturbance to the nesting area. In 2017 nest monitors reported several instances of “intruder” eagles at nests which did disrupt the nesting attempts of several pairs. One of these “eagle dramas” unfolded at the Duke Farms eagle cam watched by millions of people. An intruder female attempted to replace the current female. This harassment interrupted the pairs bonding and copulation and no eggs were laid.

This year’s report includes a section on Resightings of banded eagles. Resightings of NJ (green) banded eagles have increased over the years, as well as eagles seen in NJ that were banded in other states. These resightings are important, as they help us to understand eagle movements during the years between fledging and settling into a territory, as well as adult birds at a nest site.

For more info: www.conservewildlifenj.org/blog/2017/12/06/new-jersey-201...

New Jersey Bald Eagle Project Report | 2017 may be downloaded here: www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/ensp/pdf/eglrpt17.pdf

Tags:   American Bald Eagle Bald Eagle Birding Birds Birds of Prey Birdwatching Braveheart Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ Eagle Fledgling Freedom Garden State God Bless America Haliaeetus leucocephalus Jersey Shore Juvenile Monmouth County NJDEP Endangered and Nongame Species Program's (ENSP) New Jersey Nikon AF-S 600mm f/4G ED VR Nikon D5 Raptor Trust NJ Raptors Symbol of America US United States Wildlife Wildlife Photography © 2018 RGL Photography


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